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3

First of all, there are no absolutes. Recording is an art form (albeit one with technical considerations), and there are no rules with art. Your only guidelines are "does this sound good" and "do I like it?". Aside from that, you're free to experiment. Experimenting, however, does have its pitfalls. By placing anything in the signal chain which will alter ...


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Just get a basic Behringer USB preamp interface that supports Phantom power. Then there's a direct connection from the microphone through the preamp into the computer. Job done. Impedance isn't a problem for you. Just get the interface, plug it in and then manage the preamp gain on the interface.


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If you love the sound that you're getting, you're doing it right. What matters, is that you know your intended purpose for that vocal. Will you need the flexibility on the back end or do you already know the sound you're looking for? Compression and EQ before Tape was, and still is, a common signal chain in certain musical situations when you already ...


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Generally, compression is used in the recording chain to avoid unwanted peaks. I always run vocals through a compressor as the human voice has an incredibly wide range of dynamics and is very susceptible to sudden peaks. It is generally not used in the same way as it is in the editing stage e.g. to level out the dynamics. As for EQ, usually this should be ...


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It all depends on the quality of sound you're trying to achieve. I would not recommend using compressor while recording unless you're confident that you would not want to change eventually.


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Jay is right. Furthermore I'd think it should be possible to have to Avalon in a re-recording chain. This would allow you to add the 'colour' of the Avalon and the EQ to the recorded signal. There's a great post on how to do this on ProtoolsExpert, however this is a members only video: http://www.pro-tools-expert.com/home-page/2014/3/2/how-to-record-virtual-...


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This is a very difficult question to answer. It comes down to "how loud is loud enough" which is the same is "how long is a piece of string" So let me try answer in a generic way. Sound Pressure Level Often people mix terms like "power or watts" with "loudness" of a system. And generally speaking a system with more "watts" would be louder than a system ...


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As a theatre technician for a multitude of shows that involve everything from bands to 60 people musicals, you have a few options. You can go with a mixer as mentioned above or you can use something a little more high tech like a Pre-Sonus / Studio Live sound board that'll do it all including your in-ear monitors with iPad control, each band member can have ...


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You just need a mixer (before the headphone amp) to control what and how much goes into your in-ears. In live situations this is a very simple task for a monitor engineer but if there isn't one, the FOH engineer could send you a mix of what you need (clicks, guitar and vocals) if he has a spare auxiliary out and a spare line on his multi.


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That combination should work. Make sure the Avid has phantom power on & is set for MIC (not "LINE") input. If that doesn't fix it, swap out the cables to make sure one of them isn't bad.


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The H5 has an option to have the DB cut down from the line out out to the Camera, you can find this in the manual or on the Zoom YouTube channel for the H5


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It's not a good idea, because the levels on both the line output and the headphone output are much too high for the camera mic input. If you were to turn the volume down on the headphone output, you'd probably end up with a lot of noise on the camera recording. What you really need here is a line-mic attenuator cable. This is a cable (or adapter) that ...


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Im adding to this, except the room / ambient noise that stuff may produce (cars passing , cpu fans etc) i think you are refering to digital hashing noise, what you said as electronics noise lowering the windows volume will not fix this, this is a largely known issue and there are some ways to only try beating it. Some people never beat it and it has to do ...


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...and turn down the microphone gain to reduce background noise... That's patently counterproductive. The gain on a solid-state mic preamp should always be set as high as possible without clipping; that's the whole point of the preamp. In particular, the lower you set the gain, the higher the effective noise level will be, because any boost later on will ...


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