13

A webcam mic is going to be nowhere near good enough to record infrasound. Most mics, good or bad, aim to capture sound between 20Hz & 20KHz [the approximate absolute limits of human hearing]. The cynic in me would say that roughly, the higher the price, the closer to achieving that they may get. Then there are specialist mics - made by some very ...


8

Have done a few scenes like this before. Not sure what you mean by broken though, is that a state other than flickering? Most scenes like this seem to be variations of flickering. It's definitely worth recording some as the 'plink' sound you get from them all is different, as is the buzz and and hum. For the long tubes you can use some worn out starters to ...


7

Deep and resonant with less sharpness sounds like you want to put the mic underneath the piano pointing up at the sound board. You'll probably want to move it around down there and experiment with how it sounds in different places pointed towards different parts of the sound board. I'd start off pointed toward the bridge in the middle of the board, ...


6

There are two main elements to this answer- 1) Room- This is VERY important. I recorded an actor screaming (should've brought my earplugs!) in a wardrobe room. The room was small but not too small and the hanging clothes worked pretty well for difusion. We checked out a few different rooms and found this one to be the best. Not too dead and not too ...


6

I wouldn't record using FX unless I was very sure about the end result I wanted and how it would sit in the mix, just to leave my options open since you can't go back and remove the FX. On the other hand, if the FX are an integral part of the performance then it might be a good idea to record after the FX. Sometimes the performer might hit a 'sweet spot'that'...


6

Those are DIN connectors. DIN line-level signals expect a different impedance than is usual for RCA or XLR connections. IIRC you can put a resistor in series to convert to RCA. I'm not sure what signal level and impedance DIN microphones use. I'll see what I can dig up. It looks like this is a dictation microphone. One of the connectors allows you to ...


5

Actually you can do soundproofing without damaging the house. Using acoustic panels (expensive but provides the best result) works, however some well placed blankets using string and 3M adhesive hooks in a carpeted room can vastly change the sound of the recording because of reduced reverberation. Picking a recording time that has the least amount of noise ...


5

I can see two reasons why you'd use a gate while recording instead of in editing : 1. You're broadcasting live. 2. You're using outboard equipment. A gate should, generally, be first in your audio chain but in your case you might want to put it after your noise reduction. You never want to put it after the compressor! If you do it in editing you have ...


5

If you want to save some money and do it yourself you might try suspending a membrane of some sort, like a piece of paper or plastic, and attaching an accelerometer to it. A quick search found the MMA8453Q made by Freescale Semiconductor. It costs a dollar, takes 10bit samples, and samples at a rate of up to 800Hz. The max sensitivity mode is 2g which ...


5

I would go with 2-4 goosenecked clip microphones positioned in top and bottom of each sound source, something like this: The important thing here is that the mics stay at a fixed position, so you will not get varying levels as you play and move around, as with a mic on a stand. The DPA 4099 series would be a good choice. They actually made an accordion ...


4

As for the horse, you can watch a top artist doing it here. The dryer, why not record a real dryer drum. Just open one up and spin by hand. I've done this before. Sweeten it with the metal box idea. Usually the simplest idea is the best. Laser beam...you should probably do something that no one suggests...that way it's original :) Old school method would ...


4

I did a lot of night shooting in Downtown Los Angeles for a photo project a while back. I was concerned someone might jump me for my camera gear, so I brought someone along to watch my back as I shot. If you are concerned about your safety, bring a friend along.


4

I have recorded here in switzerland about -20 C or more. I can recommend you this: Recording in low temperatures are not such a problem, the difficult parts are putting the gear out in the cold air an back. Going into the cold: -You need to acclimate your gear before using. If you come out of a car (+25 C) into a winterday (-25 C) you have a difference from ...


4

Honestly, I just use whatever I have - even if all I have is mono. Never let the equipment get in the way of a good roomtone (or for that matter, ambience). I certainly agree with @Guido that high quality gear is best suited for roomtone to obtain the most robust S/N, but beyond that, I'm pretty loose about this type of recording. Roomtone is one of those ...


4

I do a lot of trail running alone in the mountains. I'm usually not more than 5 miles away from my car. Sometimes there are other people hiking/biking around, other times I find myself prety alone. Every bit of advice I've ever seen says that hiking alone is pretty dumb, and they're pretty much all correct. My feeling is that if you are going off ...


4

What an exciting journey! My two cents worth: Regarding the safety of your data, be sure to upload to the cloud (Dropbox or the like) whenever you have internet. Bring WAY more memory cards than you think you will need, then double that. As long as you can get it to the cloud and know someone back home has copied it locally AND backed it up preferably ...


4

Ok, so for backpacking and biking, here are the component parts: recorder: SD 702 - quality sound, durable build, simple operation. Its the heavier and bulkier of the viable options, but it won't ever fail you. SD mixpre + Sony PCM M10 - still quality sound, lighter and more compact, but also a little fiddlier since you're dealing with two devices that ...


4

A bit of feedback for those interested - I didn't actually get as much time to put into this as I'd of liked, but did get a couple of interesting recordings: Both of these were recorded in areas of quite powerful water movement, my idea of recording ambient sound from more tranquil pools didn't ...


4

Two thoughts... 1) The song is currently in the wrong key for the sound you are aiming for, vocally. The only fix for that would really be to re-record it in a more suitable key. 2) There are plugins available that can adjust the formant** of a sound without changing the pitch. Probably the best tool available for that is Melodyne [imho] which can adjust ...


4

Balancing! All your lines should be balanced. What this does it splits the signal in two and flips one half of it. Then the side that is flipped is flipped back at the end, and added to the first one, therefore cancelling the noise induced in the cable out. You need a DI box, especially since your cables are long and then something to unbalance the signal at ...


4

Even if you could record it properly, without significant background noise (e.g. in an anechoic chamber), you'd likely not be satisfied with the results. The actual recorded sound of rubbing a thread will sound quite different from what one would expect it to sound like. People won't recognize it. The foley department in any movie studio is filled with ...


3

The frame lines will be crucial, so good communication with DoP. How about hanging some blankets off-camera? You can go wild treating the space, but how much of that will be practical? p.s. can you treat the floor?


3

closest answer is the sound collector's club. Its not free, but its very cheap - and its super high quality, so well worth the price of admission.


3

This is a very music recording orientated question, so you might fare better asking on Gearslutz. I'll offer my thoughts anyway. Your equipment set up sounds excellent, BUT I think you'll find it very hard work to get a 50s/60s sound with such modern mics, mic technique (you mention M/S), mic pres, and instruments and amps. Your whole production seems ...


3

Before you make all of these decisions about the signal chain, think about what made 50s-60s rocknroll and pop music sound the way it did—it's so much more than just the mics and preamps. Do some reading about the sessions themselves, the equipment available, and the limitations that studios and bands faced in terms of gear and time. The musical groups ...


3

key things: large, super dead, super low noise floor recording space good quality shotgun and lav shotgun far enough away to match positioning on production good performance (louder than they think they need to speak, give them good context, headphone mix affects performance, sync needs to be dead-on)


3

First of all, there are no absolutes. Recording is an art form (albeit one with technical considerations), and there are no rules with art. Your only guidelines are "does this sound good" and "do I like it?". Aside from that, you're free to experiment. Experimenting, however, does have its pitfalls. By placing anything in the signal chain which will alter ...


3

If you're on a Mac or UNIX box, you might be able to do something useful with a UNIX-domain socket and dtach - basically you'd have your recording "server" save to the socket in .wav format, and then have dtach connect to the socket and multiplex the output into multiple encoders (cat, lame, flac, etc.). It would look something like this: dtach -A fifo-...


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