5

You don't connect a microphone directly to an amplifier, you would normally connect it to a sound board to be able to adjust the eq and volume prior to going to an amp. The sound board includes a component called a pre-amp which boosts the signal from the level coming off the microphone to the level needed for the amplifier. A mic signal is at a level ...


4

The gain pot does itself (more or less) exactly the same thing as a volume pot, with one important difference: it's located at the very front-end of the circuitry. So it does not only control the output level, but more so the level the signal will have in the circuit. This may not seem necessary as most amplifier circuits are (more or less) designed to work ...


4

If you want to do more percussive in your acoustic guitar, I remember that Fishman has developed their onboard-preamp, which I use. It's a preamp that combine undersaddle piezo with built-in mic beneath the preamp. Named "Classica Blend" or "Presys Blend". Or if you prefer microphone, you can use Eric Clapton style. While playing acoustic guitar with both ...


4

Indeed it's easy to generate very loud noises with a speaker system whose power is only a fraction of what's actually used in PA or HiFi systems. What's not so easy is to get any sound you want to that level, without severely distorting it. Perhaps most relevantly for music: bass frequencies need way more power to be perceived as loud as a 1 kHz signal. And ...


4

Those are powered speakers, at least they appear to be from a quick glance at the eBay page. Therefore, they have their own amplifier; you should be able to connect them directly to your microphone receiver. BTW, some terminology: the jack/plug that you are calling 1/2" is known as a 1/8" or 3.5 mm plug (the diameter, not the length, is used to ...


3

It is impossible to tell without the input impedance of the speakers, but generally speaking the answer to your question is yes - you can damage either the speakers or the amp. Say your speakers are each 8 ohms. If you connect 3 in series, you'll be presenting 24 ohms to the amp (8 + 8 + 8). This means the speakers will easily 'suck' the power off the amp, ...


3

I usually find that SM57s accentuate distortion/tinniness when the mic is pointed at the center of the speaker cone. My preferred placement is 45 degrees off-axis, aimed between the outer edge of the cone and the outer edge of the speaker. Tends to give a fuller reflection of the "sound in the room"... I'm not sure that this would totally mitigate your ...


3

I've always found a contact cleaner, such as plastic-safe DeoxIT, works wonders for these types of connections. I normally spritz some on the plug itself, then work the plug in and out of the port a few times, spritz again, remove excess, plug in and go.


3

While your plan to spend most on the microphone may actually be a good idea (you'll be able to use that microphone also at venues with a proper PA), this is not benefitial for your portable mini-amp setup. Pretty much all professional microphones (even some models for 30$) have a reasonably linear response if compared to any speaker available for 200$, so no ...


3

Your best bet is to get an SM58 for a microphone, it's the standard workhorse vocals mic, very durable and can easily be obtained for under the $200 price point. You're likely a bit off on the mixer and amp category though. The little tiny toy amps you are talking about are not really designed for amplification. If you are in a small venue, running at ...


3

Integrated circuit power amplifiers reach a point of negligible incremental return quite low on the cost curve. From a reputable source you are not going to see a measurable improvement beyond $20. It's an extremely mature technology, about the oldest and most active of any electronic technology. Correlating the quality of a headphone amp with price is ...


3

Welcome Sound Design Stack Exchange. I'm not sure this is really the right forum for your question and you may get better responses elsewhere. Nonetheless it sounds to me like a fault with the amps drive circuitry and there is unlikely to be a quick fix: It might be as simple as a dry joint, but equally it maybe as complex as a thermal condition. Anyway, ...


3

I bumped into this years ago when, as a kid, I though hey, the more speakers the better!! So I connected 3 or four sets of speakers in parallel to the little system. It would often 'click' off like you describe. It boiled down the the ohm ratings of the amplifier and speakers being entirely mismatched. Also, check to be sure there isn't a short in the ...


3

Probably, yes. "Headphone power" depends basically on two things, output voltage and headphone impedance (I discussed it in some detail here). Many devices don't bother providing a very great voltage, but for dedicated headphone amps it's pretty much expected that they can make any off-the-shelf headphones loud enough for all typical use cases. Still, if ...


3

It's generally expected that you do a little bit of research before asking questions here and that you only ask one question. In this case the manual for this device answers the question quite clearly. The Amp Out provides a 1/4 inch mono output of guitar processed with amp modeling and effects and optimized for connecting to the input of a guitar ...


3

You are correct in assuming that the speakers can only withstand the peak power for very short periods of time. The VP2520 is a 4 Ω speaker. Looking at the technical specs of the amp, it seems the continous power per channel for a 4 Ω load is only 500 W (rms). The peak power is 750 W per channel. In other words, the VP2520 appears to be a perfect match for ...


3

"Music" power is a rating that has its closest analogs in "RMS" power or "continuous" power handling. That means it is a long-term rating based on the speaker's capability to dissipate heat that is the byproduct of the conversion of electrical power to acoustic power. This rating means that you should be able to feed this speaker up to about 120 Watts of a ...


2

Well, to be perfectly fair, you get what you pay for with these things. I think $20 is not a reasonable expectation for a headphone amp at all. Headphone amps are definitely in the professional sound market, and as such, they command both a certain build quality and price range. For any decent headphone amp I would expect to pay at least $100-200 minimum, ...


2

First off, notice another label on the back of the amp: "Jacks paralleled". This means that both of the output jacks carry the same signal; there are two of them for the sole purpose of allowing you to plug in two cabinets without needing a splitter, or having a "daisy-chain" jack on the cabinets. This is a single-channel amp, as most guitar amplifiers are; ...


2

A microphone is definitely the best solution, sound-wise. And indeed almost certainly cheaper than anything built-in, if it is supposed to sound anywhere as decent. You don't necessarily need a large-diaphragm mic, though it should be a condenser. Small-diaphragm ones are available for as little as 50$ these days; you may want to spend a little more (e.g AKG ...


2

Some of that chart isn't very good in my opinion. 85dB isn't that loud. A typical concert will be at 106dB to 110dB or sometimes louder and the power requirement doubles every 6dB or so because it is an exponential scale. Additionally, sound falls off very rapidly as well. You might be able to produce an 85dB sound with one watt of power at the cone of ...


2

That looks like a piezo-electric transducer, which wouldn't need a battery. Most types of pickup don't use batteries, as far as I can remember. I can't say why you're not getting any output, though.


2

The best shape for high frequencies (and some high mid) is the horn. But a horn can actually take many shapes. For example, its walls can be parallel like a didgeridoo. In fact, most, if not all, wind instruments are effectively differently tuned versions of the horn. The reason the exponential horn is often used in loudspeakers (and this is an ...


2

Internal soundcards may give you accurate A/D conversion but get let down by compromises in the audio chip. There can be noise from the surrounding electronics, and the chip itself is optimised, often, to handle a partially amplified domestic capsule mic plugged straight in - so it's neither a proper high-level line-in nor a low noise mic-in. Going ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible