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8

Film Soundtracks are made up of 3 components: Dialogue Sound Effects Music Each of these three components can be broken down into two distinct types: Production Post-Production These types define when the sound was generated. This can either be during the "Production" phase of a film shoot, or during the "Post-Production" phase, after the principal and ...


5

shorts and a t shirt, to minimize clothing noise when doing a foot pass. clothing moves can be added separately. pants swishing noise can build up when doing multiple passes of feet.


5

A lot of Foley artists use sweat pants, soft clothes that don't make sound when rubbing together. Also take off any jewely, belts, etc.


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For the sound of dog I actually normally just use a kind of heavy-duty gloves I've epoxy-glued paper-clips on. I was gonna try other things as well when it was still just gaffed on, like pieces of horn and different types of wood, but truth be told I found this configuration to be absolutely spot-on for what I needed instantly! For the sense of weight, I've ...


4

"It depends" <- everyone's favorite answer On the films that have M&E deliverable requirements for foreign markets, basically everything's got to be covered by either cut FX or foley. It's often good practice to make sure everything is covered. That being said...depends on time. If the production is great for somebody struggling with a doorknob, ...


4

No one sound is going to do this, to get this right your effect is going to need to be a composite of several different layers. Your celery idea might form part of one layer, but is never going to do the whole job. I'd be thinking: Low ground rumble (sub) Dirt/soil movements Roots snapping Wood tearing/splintering/creaking Branches scraping Foliage ...


4

To get rid of harshness at recording try the following: Record with a distance. Rarely do we hear a paper get torn from a distance of 20-30 cm. More so 50cm+++ Go off axis. This will get rid of directional and thus high frequency material a bit. Try DeEssers or Multiband Compressors to get rid of peaks in the 4000 and 8000 Hz region Use dynamic mics instead ...


4

Well they are harsh sounds... First make sure that what you do as step number one is to control the source, change material (paper/board type, different pen or chalk etc) until you get a sound you really like. Authenticity is rarely important, fake it! Second, mic choice can go a long way, try a dynamic mic. Stay away from regular dialog/boom mics, use ...


4

It depends. If I know for sure there are no way anyone would see me, and I'm in my own studio - tee and boxers. In extreme cases also a thick Palestinian scarf (textured with skulls and crossbones for that extra audio push!) covering my mouth and nose to further reduce the risk of accidental breaths or such. But mostly I use a tee washed with a lot of ...


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Usually the smaller more intimate sounds will provide the detail, so you'll have those larger, slower, heavier wave sounds as the body and you can provide movement and texture and detail with smaller splashes, sprays etc mixed in.


4

You have some options. You can obviously burn a piece of paper, although that might pose a hazard if not contained. It's fairly simple to reproduce a sound like it, but not exactly like. I would take some cellophane stretch wrap and twist/fold it around, but you could also use aluminum foil or some other thin material. I think the foil would sound too ...


3

While everyone has provided some great answers so far regarding the recording of these harsh sounds, no one has mentioned another critical answer: Performance. If you're scribbling with the fury of a 5 year-old with a new set of crayons you're going to get some harshness, regardless of how you mic it.


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


3

I'd say it will depend very much on the position of the camera (how close it was to the subject), and then you'll have other factors such as how reflective the room is and where the rest of the crew was standing in relation to the camera and subject. Was the camera recording using only the onboard microphone? There are a lot of questions that can lead you in ...


3

"i'm afraid i could confuse a low amplitude region with an empty one" Hiya, if you delete the "Audio Files" folder after spotting all offline clips will be greyed out. The recordings have a colour, so you will easily be able to tell what's a spot clip and what's a recording.


3

Foley indeed, but adding a few real pigeon/crow wings flapping away in there works quite well too, it adds that quick whooshy air sound between the flaps. The thing to do would be quite obvious : If you're in a city, find a not too exposed park on a sunday morning (quiet background), bring some bread, feed the birds. And then run in the middle with your ...


3

Gloves, soft cover books (not pocket size) and umbrella work pretty well. Umbrella is good for bigger single flaps and if you edit umbrella recording a bit you can create wingflap loops of bigger birds like eagle and such. Also a classic approach for bats and dragons. Try some bigger soft cover books. For example the sound design book of Ric Viers works ...


3

Great ideas so far. Have a pair of real wings but also a real feather duster is great as well as leather or suede gloves (soft leather) I also use these for dog ears flapping. If the wings are really big, I take a thin shirt, put it on and pull it out with the mic underneath it and with the feather duster beat it against the shirt. works well. Good luck


3

To be honest any mic can do Foley, I've seen Foley done with an sm57 which is historically an instrument mic. Foley has much more to do with technique than what mic you are using, 80% of Foley is the art and creativity. I have done Foley with an SE1 mic which cost less than £100. As such in an emergency as long as your Foley technique is good, everything is ...


3

Well, when I think of a "charging" sound, I instantly think of something increasing. Level, pitch, both maybe. I would have a sustained sound, slowly increasing in pitch, maybe an exponentially increasing rise speed, with some distortion to start off, which attenuates as the charge reaches it's limit. I would have another sound increasing in level as the ...


3

Never actually tried it, but my first thought was just fingernails* on actual tree bark. Maybe the stuff you can get from florists - I quickly Googled 'florist supplies tree bark' & got a bunch of hits, cheap & easy to source. It's going to be perhaps more resonant than a chunk of actual tree, but it might just be easier to get some mic levels. EQ ...


2

This is a nice one... http://deauditievedienst.tumblr.com/post/42278000168/foley-trick-how-to-record-the-sound-of-screeching It's from Arnoud Traa, a Sound Designer/Recordist from Amsterdam.


2

Sometimes s**t happens but you should use this as an opportunity and not a defeat and try to restore as much audio as possible from whatever sources you can recover. You want to be remembered as the guy who, even though he lost the recording, went above and beyond to restore it from a lousy source and made it work, not the guy who wasted everyone's time. ...


2

I've recently been forced into using a clip of DSLR camera audio in a short doc, and it actually ended up sounding passable. Key was the fact that the camera was very close to the subject, so I got good signal/noise and signal/verb ratio. The technical challenge was overcoming the crappy mic and autogain. I ended up dipping out quite a bit of the ...


2

This is a really general answer and you may get better ideas by chatting with someone in person but: I think this is a really classical example of balancing time, effort and economics (how much are you asking for, how much are the others asking for). It's really just something that you need to balance, so that it feels good for you and others that are ...


2

It depends... Is it a swift or quick action or does it allow a lot of detail? Is the soil dry or wet? Can you think of a character or emotion for the trees? Have you tried some dirt sounds from your library or did you record some? Divide the sound into at least 3 layers/concepts: low (wood resonances), mid (mud), high(celery) (freq) or mass, force, strain,...


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Foley, is the way to go here. I've caught wing flaps (of crows actually), but the ambient sound was too great for them to be a focal point of the mix. Try flapping a pair of gloves (leather, fleece, whatever best matches mood/picture). I've also heard of successes performing wing flaps with a feather duster. I'd think paper is too crinkly, although a pillow ...


2

This is definitely a situation for some iceberg lettuce to get that organic stressing and ripping sound. Arnoud and Bit Depth have some great advice as well.


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If you're looking to learn about foley this is the book... http://www.amazon.ca/The-Foley-Grail-Performing-Animation/dp/0240811259


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