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10

Hey, You should check out Diego Stocco´s stuff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhQntkY1Ank He has alot of videos online,showcasing his methods....very inspiring!


8

I once tried (very nervously) putting my zoom H2 in a plastic tupperware box and holding it in a bath of water. You can get a pretty convincing underwater ambience, and also if you run the taps at the same time and place the box in various positions around the bath - even under the taps - you can get some good watery rumbles. Word of warning; check the box ...


8

Film Soundtracks are made up of 3 components: Dialogue Sound Effects Music Each of these three components can be broken down into two distinct types: Production Post-Production These types define when the sound was generated. This can either be during the "Production" phase of a film shoot, or during the "Post-Production" phase, after the principal and ...


7

I found by quickly running the back of the fingers together (or more so the fleshy middle joint section below the nail) in a fast up/down movement made for a pretty cool insect flight sound when pitched up and octave. Perform a few 'pass bys' at the microphone for added variety!


7

The first thing I do when I'm beginning a film is to WATCH it. (Better yet, I READ the script BEFORE I start to design anything). You only get one first impression. I take in the look and feel of it, the attitude and mood, and try to recognize any overarching themes or ideas the director is trying to convey. Only then do I start listening to sounds or ...


6

I used a box of fruity pebbles and a wood plank to make a scifi grain sound for a logo design last week. good times! I think I'm going to do a mentos-diet coke record session sometime in the future as well.


5

Disclaimer: its been a while... Grass itself does not really make a strong sound unless it's dried up grass. So unless you have close ups of feet walking in grass spend less time to recreate the grassy part of the sound. The green grass sound is mostly about a good NON resonant soil sound, with a little grassiness on top. Old school was using old quarter ...


5

I know: using a violin bow ain't something new, but when I bowed the ironing board of my flatmate some real nice sounds came out of it: http://soundcloud.com/michaelmanzke/gestrichenes-b-gelbrett and one thing I still want to build and record is the "jam jar jet" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARjqjRb52vA


5

Watermelon - dig through it with your hands raw chicken in marinade - awesome 'slimy guts' sounds raw egg - for some more slimy goodness hand soap - for the same macaroni and cheese - for some smush bread soaked in water - gives a nice fibrous squishy sound bell peppers - rip them apart if you need some nice crunch Grab your apron and get messy ...


5

It depends on the sound I'm trying to create ;). Pragmatically, it also depends upon the availability of a quiet, reflection-free outdoor spot vs. a foley studio — both of which can be hard to find (or afford). A project that calls for a more stylized foley track might best be served by a foley studio with an enormous assortment of props, shoes, pits, cloth,...


5

small skinny rope with a lightly weighted object tied (VERY SECURELY) to the end - record two layers - one of big looping swooshes for the initial flight out the window - maybe a 10 foot extension of the rope, then shorten the rope to 2 feet or so and go much much faster in a circle for the uncoiling. xlr cable could also work.


5

The two things that come immediately to mind are that you should look at photography and sketches of 19th century London, and you should listen to any audio material you can find from cities that are at about that level of technological development. Photography and sketches will help you determine what noise-creating objects you need to simulate. It is safe ...


5

shorts and a t shirt, to minimize clothing noise when doing a foot pass. clothing moves can be added separately. pants swishing noise can build up when doing multiple passes of feet.


5

A lot of Foley artists use sweat pants, soft clothes that don't make sound when rubbing together. Also take off any jewely, belts, etc.


5

For the sound of dog I actually normally just use a kind of heavy-duty gloves I've epoxy-glued paper-clips on. I was gonna try other things as well when it was still just gaffed on, like pieces of horn and different types of wood, but truth be told I found this configuration to be absolutely spot-on for what I needed instantly! For the sense of weight, I've ...


4

To offer an alternative viewpoint on what @Matt Glenn has said, I challenge you to use EQ, spatialization and compression/limiting INCORRECTLY in post processing - many times you need to push the envelope (or completely destroy it) in order to achieve the sound you are hearing in your head. Liberal use of distortion plugs, overlimiting and other red LED-...


4

It would help to know what kinds of bangs you are recording. Are these intended to be big metal clangs? Low-frequency impacts? Car crashes? What recording device are you using? Are you hearing the clipping or just seeing it on the meters? In most cases, the key ingredients to a powerful and believable impact recording are multiple perspectives (layers), ...


4

As I side note (quasi-related), if it's of any help, I've found that having some distance between the mic and the source for things like buttons and switches help - it seems that the proximity effect causes it to sound unnatural and hard to 'undo' in Post, but even so much as 1-2 feet of added distance helps it have a natural sound by letting the sounds it ...


4

A ribbon is going to give you a "warmer" more "smeared" sound on metal stuff than a condenser will usually give you. If that's what you're going for, then give it a shot. I tend to prefer "faster" mics that work well on transient material when I'm recording metal. My Sennheiser mkh800's are my favorite metal mics. I have recorded gun foley, which is very ...


4

Sounds like a fun challenge! Flour is soft, not coarse like sugar. Maybe very soft, pillowy sounds would be good to add: Impacts into pillows, cloth hits, maybe even foley of things being dropped into talcum powder or flour itself (guaranteed to be messier than any liquid, though). Maybe even experiment with snow foley?


4

Business Cards? Post-It Notes? Credit/plastic cards? These are just some ideas, but it also depends upon the action required. Break away from the literal sound playing cards make and think of textures and frequency variances. All the above props offer different tonality, brittleness, frequency characteristics. It's the juxtaposing of various carefully-...


4

depends on what the moves are. if they're of shuffling, dealing, etc you may want to bring someone in that's had a lot of experience doing those things. card moves can sound dramatically different in the hands of a pro vs in the hands of an amateur.


4

As for the horse, you can watch a top artist doing it here. The dryer, why not record a real dryer drum. Just open one up and spin by hand. I've done this before. Sweeten it with the metal box idea. Usually the simplest idea is the best. Laser beam...you should probably do something that no one suggests...that way it's original :) Old school method would ...


4

For Foley Usually LDCs (large diaphragm condensors) since of prime importance, they retain a lower noise floor. U87s are often used for this, sometimes with an MKH 416 or KM81/82 as a room mic. Octava makes a good LDC I've used, although I cannot recall the model number - it's cylinder-looking one. AT2035 would more in the bargain range. For FX, it can ...


4

"It depends" <- everyone's favorite answer On the films that have M&E deliverable requirements for foreign markets, basically everything's got to be covered by either cut FX or foley. It's often good practice to make sure everything is covered. That being said...depends on time. If the production is great for somebody struggling with a doorknob, ...


4

No one sound is going to do this, to get this right your effect is going to need to be a composite of several different layers. Your celery idea might form part of one layer, but is never going to do the whole job. I'd be thinking: Low ground rumble (sub) Dirt/soil movements Roots snapping Wood tearing/splintering/creaking Branches scraping Foliage ...


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