5

Warning: this is perhaps not the answer you are looking for :) You have already got enough gear. What you really need is time, patience, perseverance. Experiment with what you already have, whatever it is that you own, use your imagination and creativity. A typical style of music was not only 'invented' because of the sound or purpose of the gear; it was ...


5

If you are on a budget you might want to give the Blue Microphones Yeti a try. It has switchable pick up patterns on it one of with it polar which will pick up 360 degrees around the mic. It's USB so it should be able to interface with Skype with no problem at all.


4

As for the horse, you can watch a top artist doing it here. The dryer, why not record a real dryer drum. Just open one up and spin by hand. I've done this before. Sweeten it with the metal box idea. Usually the simplest idea is the best. Laser beam...you should probably do something that no one suggests...that way it's original :) Old school method would ...


4

The only thing that really stands out to me about your setup is the lack of FX. You can safely disregard any effects built in to your mixer. There are a ton of great rack units out there from the '90s that can be found for peanuts on eBay and your local version of Craigslist. Start with Alesis - take a look at the Wedge, QuadraVerb, MidiVerb and Ineko/Akira....


3

You're not going to find anything worth using that you can buy for that budget. My suggestion would be to find a local shop that rents gear out and talk to them about what you'll be shooting and how. They'll be able to give you advice on what to use and how, and you'll likely get better equipment for the money you'll be spending. Granted, you won't own the ...


3

This is a really old question now but I thought I would add to the list. Rene Coronado (Dallas), Dustin Camilleri (Chicago) and myself (Toronto) have just released a new podcast that is all about sound design and audio post. Its called Tonebenders. If you want to take a listen to the first episode you can go to www.tonebenders.net and download it or grab ...


3

The first thing is, don't make it totally gone at any point. Listen to the audio of medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy; the sound never really leaves the soundtrack completely. Fade it down and up, but not completely out. Second, use viewpoint changes in the camera editing to adjust the level of the sound; take the opportunities when the camera moves ...


3

I second Mike Rinehart's suggestion of the Blue Yeti. Although I haven't used one personally, it is one of the most popular budget mics on the market. Its switchable pickup pattern means you can set it to capture sound from all directions equally. Interestingly, it actually has three condenser capsules, which allows it to be used in a wide range of ...


3

Built-in laptop speakers are largely useless. A cheap headphone already has a much better chance at reproducing lower frequencies. Its stereo representation is rather different from that of a pair of loudspeakers, so the latter certainly worthwhile getting. Previously high-end vintage headphones and active speakers tend to be sold for prices that are ...


2

If you want to synt the laser: If it is a shooting laser: Get a mettalic, somewhat dissonant soundsource with fm or wavetable synth. Use a pitch envelope the get the piuuu. Then use a filter lp/bp with another decaying envelope. experiemnt with resoanze till you get a pleasant piuuu. Try to layer it with some textures out of Omnisphere or whatever if it ...


2

Hey JM, The horse is a classic! If you've not seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail then I highly recommend it. For many reasons, but the constant gag of using coconut shells as horse hooves is brilliant. And for us foley folk, practical. Like Justin says the dryer seems like a no brainer, record a real one and perhaps layer it with the ideas you've ...


2

VirtualDJ also does all this, and comes in a free addition as well. From the website: Designed for home DJs, VirtualDJ Home includes nearly all the features of VirtualDJ Pro, with only a few limitations. If you don't own or don't plan to use any additional DJ hardware (mixer, turntable, DJ controller or video projector), then VirtualDJ Home will ...


2

I think I was reasonably lucky when I bought my Mackie HR624 speakers - I just trawled the net and these seemed to be recommended the most (for my budget back in 2009 of about £500 a pair). Now I know what to look for because what follows was the first (and most important) lesson I learnt when I plugged them in: - So, I plugged them in and went straight ...


2

Quality of recorded audio (in the digital realm) is measured by captured frequencies (sample rate) and dynamic accuracy (Bit Depth). Once recorded, changing those wont improve the signal, only increase the file size. If your noise floor is too loud when compared to your voice then you need to reduce the noise. There are expensive programs that do this quite ...


2

There's a database of elephant sounds at http://www.elephantvoices.org/ and you could try The Elephant Listening Project: http://www.birds.cornell.edu/BRP/elephant/


2

Two resources to try: Ann Krober at Sound Mountain. She oversees a vast library of sounds that may or may not include playful elephants. The Macaulay Library. From their site: The Macaulay Library is the world's largest and oldest scientific archive of biodiversity audio and video recordings. Our mission is to collect and preserve recordings of each ...


2

You should check out Sonic Visualiser. It's free, has image export built in and is generally designed for this sort of thing.


2

Many manufacturers make microphones specifically for conferencing that have purpose-designed coverage patterns and low profiles. An example is a Shure MX396, which can be obtained with several polar patterns, and speaking from experience, works quite well.


2

From what I can tell your sources sound just fine! You should definitely not record "hotter", i.e. with more gain. And the mixes are in general balanced - I'd be a little harder with compressors here and there. You should not raise the volume on each track in Cubase either, as that will just lead to channel or bus clipping. That "professional sound" you ...


2

No "standards" that I'm aware of, but what I've seen most often in film post-production is: Production Dialog ADR Group FX Design BG Foley Music


2

Most USB devices use the standard USB audio device driver, as they all conform to the USB Audio standard. Behringer has a cohort of haters out there that spend all their time not making music and just bagging hardware vendors they don't like. Behringer actually make some pretty good and affordable gear. RME is also definitely worth a look - their devices are ...


1

All you need is: Computer (PC or Mac is ok.) Multi-channel recording and editing software (Audacity, Reaper, Cubase, Garageband, Logic...etc.) External USB sound card with 48V phantom power (Firewire is extinct. Don't buy anything with Firewire.) (Be sure that it has 48V phantom power. There are fake marketing products with useless 15V phantom power.) ...


1

heres is the solution! thats what i wanted. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sound-report-writer/id492004803?mt=8


1

I don't know if this is what you really looking for, but Sound Devices made app for I-phone "CL WIFI" in witch you can make sound report, and manage your metadata. But like I said it's for Sound Devices


1

One of the most important thing with all the new loudness recommendations is fader/volume automation. Also while mixing, have a very light Master Buss Compressor on right from the Start! Then I go like this: Compress your dialogue if needed. If the dialogue is too Dynamic, its hard to Level anything correctly. I would use 3-9 dB on normal dialogue and 6-...


1

I think these guys have provided some great answers, but one answer I'm not seeing is to morph the sound. The idea being, the beeping monitor sound changes to something else over a period of time. Slowly morph the sound using filters, distortion, oscillators or other sound fx. You could also morph the sound into another sound, and since a heartbeat is ...


1

Try adding a Low-Pass filter to the beeping sound and automating it. The more high frequency is cut out, it will sound as if it's fading out.


1

Keith gave you some great tips already. In particular, the idea of change is a key psychoacoustic cue to pay attention to something. The more regular and static a particular sound is, and the longer it remains that way, the more likely we are to ignore it. Get it to the point where we are ignoring it, and any little change draws your attention back to it. ...


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