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6

Unison - Detune Simultaneous voices singing approximately the same pitch, but slightly detuned from one another. Inspired by the sonic artifact produced when a choir sings a note in unison without being in perfect tune with each other, this characteristic can be replicated by duplicating a single audio recording and moving the pitch randomly up and down ...


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The generic term for split / separated tracks is "stems". If you google "vocal stems" you'll find free ones for random songs, not hits but usable. Vocal stems for popular songs are usually available (at a price) from the label or artist.


4

Two thoughts... 1) The song is currently in the wrong key for the sound you are aiming for, vocally. The only fix for that would really be to re-record it in a more suitable key. 2) There are plugins available that can adjust the formant** of a sound without changing the pitch. Probably the best tool available for that is Melodyne [imho] which can adjust ...


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The best way I can think of removing the vocals is splitting the stereo track into its respective left and right mono channels. After that, invert the phase of one of the mono channels and you will get the vocals cancelled out. The downside to this is that there is a high possibility that it might change how the stereo track originally sounded like. Another ...


4

This sounds like a live setup so I'd say the SM58 is an excellent choice of microphone for the purpose. I'm more concerned about the amplifier. A bit of research tells me this is an acoustic guitar amp which can also take a vocal microphone and although I haven't heard this model that setup is hardly ideal. Might be OK for practicing but if you're playing ...


4

Things Tubes, straws, pipes and hoses Cups Put things in mouth (e.q. water or sweets... don't choke!) Pillows Balloons (scream all you can while pressing a balloon to the mouth) Combs and paper, foil etc. Moving Fans Vibrator on throat Tubes into water Springs (toy spring mics, Thunder Drums etc) Head Shake / Rotate (poor mans leslie/tremolo) Hands ...


3

The John Grant song samples linked from the comment are a mixture of chorus, short delays, and reverb. I don't see the connection between the effects I mainly hear and your "soft consonants" observation. My best guess is you should research compression and/or vocal doubling (and pop filters if you need one) to achieve the sound you want.


3

Sorry to say, there is no perfect way of doing this. The link you provided uses the same technique I was going to describe but this requires that you have the original and an exact instrumental copy. Even that technique is not perfect and will still have some background noise. One piece of AWESOME software that does this with techniques that are far beyond ...


3

Answering the portions of your question related to quality and the why of things, speaking is much more mono-tonal than singing. We use a much smaller set of frequencies and thus are used to picking out more nuances when speaking. The EQ needs to be much more cleanly shaped and enunciation needs to be more pronounced in relation to tone because we key more ...


3

First of all, there are no absolutes. Recording is an art form (albeit one with technical considerations), and there are no rules with art. Your only guidelines are "does this sound good" and "do I like it?". Aside from that, you're free to experiment. Experimenting, however, does have its pitfalls. By placing anything in the signal chain which will alter ...


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If you are using lavalier mics [tiny headset or tie-mics that look no bigger than a knot in the wire] then you should not set them directly in front of the mouth, but at the side, or even in the hair, if you really want them hidden. Hidden in clothing is also an option, though you can get a lot of movement noise that way. Example images [stolen from Google, ...


3

To add to James' answer… I would personally never use a delay to fake the number of voices, I would always just keep adding tracks til I had enough. Secondly, I always pan all BVs away from centre [spread from 10% to 100% width], leaving a hole for the lead vox if there is one, or just a space in the centre if there isn't. So long as it's not too big a ...


3

If the vocals are in different languages then no, there is nothing that can be done to cancel them out automatically. If the different lyrics have gaps in different places then you could manually select these gaps using a DAW and drop them into a "master" version.


2

Zoom way in on the waveform and cut at the "zero crossing," where the waveform crosses from the positive part of the wave to the negative through the horizontal line that runs through the middle of the display. Not to be too zen about it, but you want the waveform to pass through the edit point as if nothing happened. Then, as stavrosound said, add a very ...


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Crossfade it. That's the only way to prevent snaps. Occams Razor ;)


2

Use volume automation rather than cuts. That way you can pull the annoying noises to the background without creating audible gaps. If you cut, then the remaining ends ought to be faded to "0" by using fade-ins/fade-outs, otherwise they'll pop.


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I recommend doing it the same way a dialogue editor would - manually edit them out, small crossfades in between. Then try a noise supression tool after the fact as icing on the cake. It's a great way to learn how to edit in practice. Take dialogue for instance. anyone editing voice must learn the intricacies of inflection, rhythm, and cadence - and ...


2

If you really needed to get rid of them I would try Izotope RX3 spectral repair. It can be extremely time consuming especially if your inexperienced with it. The tough thing about dish sounds is they are in the same frequency range as the parts of the voices that you want to preserve. It can save lots of time and money to get a good recording in off the ...


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I don't think there is a gizmo to fix this besides: proper use of cedar, izotope or an eq/hipass filter combined with good old pencil in Pro tools. The point is that the energy from the plosive makes the capsule 'tremble', creating a distortion in lower mid band of the p. So it's not easy to fix.. The only real gizmo to fix this is.... precaution/a good ...


2

There are tons of apps for this. From wikipedia: AthTek Free Voice Changer, Skype Voice Changer, AV Voice Changer Software Diamond 7.0, MorphVOX of Screaming Bee INC, Fake Voice Or maybe try Avox Mutator.


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Assuming the recording and levels are good in the first place. I will almost always roll off lows and shelf the highs, even if its just a little. Human voices don't really have much below 120hz or above 12khz so get rid of it. Next I work low to high on the frequency band. It usually looks something like this: A lot of voices often have a specific ...


2

This implies that your track is in mono. Centre channel extraction gets the difference of the L and R tracks - making the assumption that the difference broadly equates to a middle channel, which is usually where the vocals are. If your song is old, it may have been recorded in mono, which means there is no difference between L and R channels (or almost no ...


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You could go into Audacity and use Noise Removal. Select a section of chatter, preferably with no talking by the professor (between his breaths, maybe)? With your selection active, go through the effect tab until you find Noise Removal. Select it and click 'get noise profile'. Now, select all of your audio, go to Noise Removal again and click OK. It may ...


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They purchased it from the artist, or possibly the record company. There is no other clean or effective option. Sound, and particularly voices are complex and once you mix sounds together, they can't be separated cleanly. It's kind of like if you mix water from one cup with water in another cup, you can't get the water back in the cups they came from. If ...


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No it isn't; neither is it possible in wavelab or any other piece of software I've come across. Maybe someone out there knows differently? What you are asking about is the ability of software to detect (sometimes) very subtle changes in pitch. Vocal pitch changes are not uncommon even for the most perfect of singer and it is the human brain that ultimately ...


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If you love the sound that you're getting, you're doing it right. What matters, is that you know your intended purpose for that vocal. Will you need the flexibility on the back end or do you already know the sound you're looking for? Compression and EQ before Tape was, and still is, a common signal chain in certain musical situations when you already ...


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Looked up your mic! Good news is that the pickup pattern is very narrow so you should get a lot out of just making sure it doesn't point towards the speakers - then again, in tiny spaces like this, the sound reflects so much that that's clearly not enough. The frequency response for your mic is also available online - it appears to have a rather large ...


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