5

Honestly, my answer to this question, in which you infer that you plan to rely primarily on audio, is "do it any other way than you are planning". Here's why; I work for an alarm monitoring company. In our line of work, where every signal from an alarm panel could be snot-nosed employees playing around or a matter of life and death, it's video, not audio, ...


4

Personally, I would be very careful making a decision based on these graphs. At least have an extensive listening test to find out how what you think the graph says translates into what you hear. Your ears don't have a flat frequency response, and it's notoriously difficult to measure the frequency response of headphones in an absolute way that transfers ...


4

The root issue is one of physics, mixing should always and only be done on monitors. Low frequencies = larger waveform = more distance/time/space required for the frequency to develop audibly (read: montitors in a room). Air between your ears and the cones are what's necessary to properly evaluate mix decisions. No real way around that, even with some ...


4

I doubt this is really an error – as this interface is USB-powered, the designers probably spec'd the headphone output with rather low maximum voltage, so as to avoid supply problems; I know at least the old Tascam US-x2y series suffered from that problem. For consumer headphones, which are targeted at low-voltage battery-supplied devices and hence ...


3

Perhaps Source-connect would help. http://source-elements.com/


3

Wireless is the way to go. Try feeding the boom op what's coming out of the mains via a Comtek feed. Have your boom op transmit via a Lectro setup. That way the boom up is fully unrestrained by cable tethers. I boom op'd on a feature a long time ago and the mixer preferring working this way - it was fantastic, freedom for both the mixer and boom op to be ...


3

What are you generating your metronome with? You can feed the metronome generator into an empty channel on the mixer. Turn the fader all the way down to -infinity for that channel and use the aux send (pre fader) to send the metronome signal to the Q that you are using to amplify the headphone signal. That way the signal is sent to the aux before it reaches ...


3

You have a few options, 1) you can buy a 1/8 or 1/4 inch headphone jack and short the L R connections together since (in an unbalanced situation (most regular headphones)) they share a common ground. Keep in mind you will be driving twice the load from the same source which will effect the output. 2) You can buy a headphone amplifier that has a mono ...


3

It depends on how decent the gear is where you are playing. If they have cheap stuff, it might be a problem, but from the medium end on up, they should either be able to use channel line inputs that go after the pre-amp on their board or they should be able to bring it back in along an insert signal path with the output from the insert discarded. That said,...


3

It is possible in some sense, and I believe there is software around that is designed specifically for this, but there are also reasons why this might not be the best approach. Obviously the character of your speakers affects the sound dramatically, but so to does the room. Measuring the response accurately enough to implement the EQ effectively would really ...


2

I'm a boom and i absolutely hate comteks!! Terrible terrible sound....I've been using the sennheiser EK 2000 and like it much better! Longer range and much better sound. If we don't have a wireless transmitter for the boom mic, i prefer using a duplex cable, and have the monitoring trough the cable as well.


2

I would consider the most important "rule" of monitor placement to be the geometry. That is... You should have an equilateral triangle made up of the two monitors and the listening position. You should consider the tweeters to be the points from which you measure, as the higher frequencies are the most directional. As an example, for my home theater, I ...


2

I'm more of a live audio guy than recording and tend to use in-ears for my monitoring, but my understanding of the idea behind isolation pads is to absorb the vibration of the speaker and/or the surface and prevent it from impacting the sound produced by the driver. Something like a computer monitor stand is going to be more worried about providing a hard, ...


2

Beyer Dynamic DT 770 Pro 32 ohm ? also worth exploring: Sony 7510 24 ohm Re "working it out": Read this and this. At same sensitivity ("The sensitivity rating is usually for 1 milliwatt power input to the phones and a corresponding sound pressure level (SPL) output (usually 102 to 106 dB SPL output for moderate to high sensitivity rated phones)." source):...


2

You need to use the Aux sends in a pre-fader configuration. As you inferred, with pre-fader levels being used for Aux sends, you can leave the volume of a channel turned down in the mains, but still can route it to the two aux sends. If you don't use the pre-button on Aux 2 on that board however, it will operate as post-fader which would mean no signal ...


2

Ill answer your concerns in order 1) This depends on what you have but most if not all the mixers I have ever encountered have both line an mic level inputs. Some of the new digital stuff has a single socket can be set to what you need (usually XLR style). You should not have an issue here unless they have some very strange console. Chances are if they ...


2

Whatever you do, you'll definitely need some kind of headphone amp(s) to properly drive the headsets' low impedance. With such amplification, the aux sends should be just fine, they shouldn't feature more clipping than the master output. Of course, the aux sends will only me mono; IMHO that should always be ok for monitoring (or in fact better: I once ...


2

Yes, according to the manual, page 20, the FX output on the mixer is before the internal effects processing, so you may use that output as an AUX too. You could perhaps free up the other AUX send by using the 2TRK Out option for recording instead. Also, if you don't mind the mix being mono, there is a pretty neat trick: use L for the P.A. and R for the ...


2

Those outputs are actually mono. When combined they provide the desired stereo effect You can use the cable to connect the L or R output to the speaker, yet need to be careful when using panning on the channel buses as this will effect volume in this situation


2

If you only have one speaker, you will only be able to output mono sound. Stereo sound requires two speakers. By convention, you should use the left 1/4 in. output to run to your speaker and ensure that the PAN knobs are all moved to the left (since you aren't using the right output). It is also worth noting that unless your speaker is powered, you will ...


2

I managed to solve it! There seems to be very little information available online on how to do this, which is odd because I'd expect it's quite common amongst YouTubers. Here is exactly what I did. Download and Install FL Studio, ensuring ASIO4ALL is installed as part of the installation as usual. Download and install Voicemeeter Banana - http://vb-audio....


2

Systems such as SMAART and other Real Time Analyser based approaches can be used to level a system against EQ variation at a particular output level, however the problem is that the variations in a speaker can often be somewhat dynamic. The exact behavior of a speaker is going to be a combination of how accurately it's voice coil is able to control the ...


1

"Should I get some studio monitors to plug into the TRS outputs with actual TRS cables?" Yes.


1

Sony MDR-7506/V6's have served me, and many others, well for many years in this configuration.


1

What are you comparing this low output on the headphone amplifier to? I realize that you say these K240's work fine on your laptop, but are you monitoring the same ProTools output on your laptop that you're trying to run through the MBox Mini? Have you eliminated everything else as the issue? Do you use the 1/4" monitor outputs on the back of the MBox Mini? ...


1

I did some reading, and I see several complaints that the headphone output on the Mbox mini is very weak. Depending on the version, 60mW or 20 mW into 32 Ohm. The Presonus Firebox, by comparison, can go ridiculously loud, and has 150 mW into 60 Ohm. An iPhone has 30 mW per channel. Getting low impedance versions of headphones is one way to get louder output,...


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