11

It's just how bit rate is defined. It's "bits of data per second". So if you compress something, even losslessly, it's at a lower bitrate. The association between "low bitrate" and "low quality" comes from lossy codecs like MP3, which let you trade off quality for file size. Lossless codecs like FLAC instead let you trade off CPU time (at least during ...


8

Threshold is the point set for when the compressor actually starts compressing once the volume of the program or track reaches above that level. Note that it's a static volume, so if you have a voice or instrument that is all over the place due to levels, you might want to do a pre-leveling with a fader/volume automation to even it out so it's always hitting ...


8

It's important to remember that a compressor does not make a sound louder, it reduces dynamic range. By bringing down the peak values, you give yourself more headroom to bring up the overall signal level (so the quieter parts can be louder). It is that "make up gain" which makes a sound louder, not the act of compression. The choice between using ...


8

FLAC compression levels are (only) a trade of between encoding time and file size. The decoding time is pretty much independent of compression rate. In the following I will refer to the compression levels 0, ..., 8 as FLAC-0, ..., FLAC-8. In short: I recommend FLAC-4! The Easy Solutions Obviously: If I don't care about encoding time and since space is ...


7

There are two questions here that I think should be addressed separately: Question 1: "is this a bad method of practice?" As I understand it, the reason it's considered "better" to compress individual tracks and not the master bus is because you have a finer degree of control, especially in today's digital world where you could instance a compressor on ...


6

I use MPEG Streamclip from Squared 5. It's free, and it transcodes just about everything out there.


6

Ah, the old question: How do I make the vocals heard over a band with a tiny PA? It's not always easy. Compression won't help you; it may actually make things worse by making feedback more likely. It sounds like you're using underpowered PAs, and if you want the vocals to be loud enough you'll need the band to play more quietly. But the band has to want to ...


6

The only ubiquitous one is mp3. AAC is great on Apple products, but only mp3 works on everything. When storing voice audio you can go for a very low quality, and potentially use mono if you don't require stereo. This will give you very high compression - approaching that of speex. From the Wikipedia comparison page Bit Rate: mp3 8 to 320 kbit/s speex ...


5

A compressor would be an ideal use for an insert. An insert is both the input and the output. They use a TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) connector. The tip, for instance, will be the send, and the ring would be the return. The mixer usually labels the insert so you know which is input and which is output. You'd use a 'Y' cable. The bottom of the 'Y' is TRS. ...


5

Take a look at this (I made a quick snapshot of it as the fist kick came in. To the left is guitar and bass unadulterated, in the middle is the kick and to the right is no kick but reduced guitar and bass until the next kick comes along: - I don't think it's side-chaining, I think it's regular compression with a long sustain i.e. the kick comes in and gets ...


5

No. Once lossy formats are encoded, any data not saved within the file is lost. You could convert a lossy MP3 to a WAV or an M4A file but the quality of the WAV or M4A would be exactly the same as the original MP3.


5

Here, is there any common low-end level that every song should has? No or Does it just set by ear? Yes. In fact, it should be set by ear, not by eyes. Don't bother with what the spectrum analyzer tells you, it is dumb and doesn't know or say very much. You have to listen for the right sounds. or Does it depend on the music genres? Definitely. Hip-...


4

GENERALLY (because as you well know, every project is different), the difference is that I tend to use more compression on TV, because a) I have to hit a LKFS spec and b) I usually have far less time to ride levels so multiple compressors can go a long way. In film I usually start with very minimal processing on the bus... just a peak limiter and then add ...


4

In theory there is no difference. In practice, using parallel compression gives you more control over how the sound is processed going in and coming out. For example,you could process just the low end of a drum loop to add more power to the the kick. Also, since it uses bussing you could send the output of multiple tracks to a single parallel compressor and ...


4

Neil Fein wrote a great post about what you can do, but another thing to consider is to make sure you talk with the sound guy about how you want it to sound. If there is a dedicated engineer there and it is a smaller venue, chances are good that they aren't very good and may be used to the "living room experience" ie, crank the bass and the guitars and ...


4

On mixing drums down, The top pro: Once your drum mix is right you don't need to worry about individual levels - it is just done The main con: A particular song might require pulling out some tones from a particular drum to give some headroom to another instrument, but your only alternative is to use an equaliser We tend to mix down prior to a live gig, ...


4

It's common and good practice to mix the drums to a group track, in pretty much any situation; that group track might well have a compressor (possibly even multiband) on it, but I still wouldn't call this mastering. Unless you're limited by CPU performance, it's not useful to bounce that group track to a fixed file; just leave the group track as it is so you ...


4

Since FLAC by definition is lossless compression there shouldn't be any data loss unless there is an error during encoding. In my experience, when you compress a WAV file to FLAC it reduces the size by about 1/3. (The FLAC web site claims even better compression, and as @Mulvya pointed out in the comments, this is due to the content of the recording). The ...


4

It kinda matters what order you put them in but everyone has a different order that they like and then sometimes you adjust for issues. Most Channel strips let you change the order of at least some of the modules. I tend to default to EQ/DYN/De-es/multiband but everyone is different. Sometimes you might need 2 of certain processes, 1 to fix an issue, ...


4

What you are asking is impossible to determine from a spectrogram. Spectrograms indicate frequencies present, not the quality of the audio. There may be loss of fine detail in one that would barely show up on a spectrogram at all or there could be noise and artifacts introduced that would make the spectrogram look more full. Spectrograms do not ...


3

Normalization is the process of both making the loudest peak 0 dB and making all the tracks the same volume. Compression means that you lower the peaks to get a more consistant volume so you can make it louder to get the highest peak at 0 dB. Well, you can't really go over 0 dB. At infinity dB the speaker is in the middle. At 0 dB the speaker is at the far ...


3

As with many things, it's a tradeoff. On the one hand, doing everything in post offers the most flexibility - you can compress and gate after the fact, and if you don't like the result you can change the settings around and try again without having to re-record. You can also cherry-pick individual regions to process differently if you like. On the other ...


3

The problem is that Google Play Music does not currently have support for Podcasts. Due to this, it is going to be next to impossible for you to get a file down to the necessary size without breaking it into sections and publishing them as an album. Even at the 320kbps quality that Google Play produces for end user consumption from the FLAC files, you ...


3

i used no compression. just a slow attack on the ADSR :-)


3

Using an EQ for mastering should be a corrective process; so you need to know what you are trying to correct in the sound. Don't just use EQ or dynamics because that's what you think mastering is. If the sound is working, then leave it alone. If it isn't working, then you need to figure out what is wrong and what tool you need to use to fix it. If your ...


3

I'd recommend having a look here: http://www.barryrudolph.com/mix/comp.html Covers all the basics well


3

From what I've read -- days ago, when I was creating my first impulse responses -- you can't technically get a compressor IR to work. Sure, you can get it's coloring, but it will never actually compress -- that's just the science of convolution.


3

When you encode a WAV file to an MP3, some information is irretrievably lost. When you decode the MP3 back to a WAV file, the decoder recreates something close to the original waveform, but not exact due to the lost information. When you re-encode the WAV file back to MP3 once again information is lost. The second MP3 file is of lesser quality than the ...


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