Hot answers tagged

14

While I haven't heard the second season of the show, I agree with Gary on this. As a re-recording mixer, I have heard plenty of my shows degrade once on air. One of the biggest things we are faced with now is the use of expanders by the networks. In a misguided attempt to compete with the volume levels of commercials, broadcasters are resorting to ...


12

In the first place, not all brands use these designations in the same way. Generally, an xbus mixer has x busses to sum signal. The simplest is a two bus mixer. Stereo. A left bus and a right bus. You determine what signal goes to which bus with a pan pot. A 4 bus mixer likely isn't counting the stereo main out, and is referring, instead, to the sub-...


11

A PRE Fader aux is sent out BEFORE the volume fader (and usually the mute)... so any volume changes made on the fader are not reflected in the send. When monitoring, this means you can have a different mix going to the Monitors then the Mains... for example VO talent might want a guide track in the headphones to help with timing, but you don't want to hear ...


7

This is often caused by accidentally sending a FX Return channel back into the Bus that is feeding the same FX processor that return is coming from, creating a loop. Select your FX Return channels and view the HOME screen, which shows you all of the 16 Bus sends for that channel on the right. Make sure that for each FX return, there is no send level to its ...


6

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


6

It was bound to happen before long: - Not easy to achieve technically and I can't vouch for its quality but I know two guys who have facebook "liked" this product and one of them does live gigs. The trick is to efficiently take a slice of the 5V offered from the USB and efficiently convert it to a higher voltage that is more practical for audio mixing such ...


5

+1 to Sonsey's explanation of Pre and Post-fade sends. However, I'd add that you don't ALWAYS send monitor mixes prefade, either. I have a large vocal ensemble that I mix regularly, whose monitors sends I almost always send POST-fader. Why? Because I want them to hear in their monitors the same mix that the house is hearing, so that they can more ...


5

If you're going to do your channel switching in software, I would start looking into external hardware interfaces instead of "sound cards". The first step up is hardware interfaces that connect with USB2 or FW400, but beyond that you're actually using a PCI slot just to get the raw throughput to a DIFFERENT piece of hardware that actually handles the I/O. ...


5

This is an extremely basic live board that isn't really designed for recording. What are you doing with monitors and headphones? Do they actually have independent feeds? If not, I would suggest simply using the headphone output on your EMU and feed in in to a headphone distribution amplifier to send the output to multiple outputs. You are getting noise ...


5

There certainly are plain summing mixers available – mainly for modular studio setups, where you have the channel strips seperately; that's a pretty high-grade application so they tend to be rather expensive per-feature. One device with exactly the configuration you're asking for is the Speck Electronics X-Sum. Of course, these devices don't have mic preamps,...


5

A compressor would be an ideal use for an insert. An insert is both the input and the output. They use a TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) connector. The tip, for instance, will be the send, and the ring would be the return. The mixer usually labels the insert so you know which is input and which is output. You'd use a 'Y' cable. The bottom of the 'Y' is TRS. ...


5

How are you using the external sound card/audio interface with the iPad(s)? A better answer will require a more detailed explanation of our setup, including model numbers or at least what kind of connectors each component provides. The simple answer is if you can plug source A into speaker B and it works well enough for you without a mixer, then no you don'...


5

This is in a DJ context, so I'm presuming you're talking about a DJ-style mixer with a crossfader, rather than a more traditional line mixer. You've got at least two audio sources (at least one laptop, at least one iPad), so if you want to play them at the same time, you'll need some kind of mixer. However, if you plan to play only one device at a time (...


5

I'd say you really need a balanced line converter. Google will find dozens. Keep the unbalanced connection as short as possible & run the rest balanced. Simply connecting mini-jack to XLR does not balance the signal, it just runs one wire 'empty', making the potential for interference even higher Once balanced, you can run the cables for far ...


5

I am somewhat reluctant to answer the question, due to the fact that I cannot find any further info (such as manuals) for that Leem LMM-6S mixer. I did found a Leem HM-624 which looks at least somewhat similar, but that didn't allow me to download the manual either. Without further information, wiring diagrams, and details on the actual PA system, the only ...


5

At first I was reluctant to answer this question, as I believe in order to do this properly, will cost more than the value of said sub-woofer. However as nobody else has commented, I will give you an answer on how you can do this. There are two problems we need to overcome: The mixer has no further outputs to connect the subwoofer. The subwoofer has ...


4

Using some rather expensive and specialized hardware, such as a Dolby surround encoder. If your stereo system has a discrete 5.1 analog input that would be easier to get set up either by manual cable-swapping or via a mixer that allows for multiple discrete submixes. This may introduce some latency, however. Alternately, if your computer has multiple ...


4

Well, they do call it 'phantom' power (-: A typical condenser mic presents almost zero load to the power supply, so the voltage doesn't drain away quickly when the power is switched off. Typical, and nothing to be concerned about.


4

The point of the connector is to make it more secure. The plastic clip isn't very strong on a standard network jack and that isn't good for live production environments that aren't permanent installs. You can use a normal cable just fine as long as the plastic clip can actually latch in place. If it doesn't actually latch in place, you can just put an end ...


4

This is because the 5/6 jack is a stereo jack designed for a 3 pin 1/4" connector. If you are feeding it a mono feed, it is going to have issues. When you pull it out part way, you remove the sleeve contact point and make it go back to being a single mono connection. If you want to use it as two mono channels that are stereo linked, you will need to get a ...


4

Yes you can! Each block of 8 can be sourced regardless of the label. You could map the 17-24 section to any of the AES blocks (meaning 17-24 could be mapped to AES50 A1-8).


4

I have recently run across this exact issue and have found the answer so thought I'd share. PC microphones are a type of "electret" microphone which is essentially a specific type of unbalanced condenser microphone which requires a +5v potential applied across the middle pin, also called "Plug-in power." Pin 1 is ground, pin 2 is +5v and pin 3 is the "hot" ...


3

According to the Amazon link you provided for the Decibel Meter, the inputs are line level. This means that you will need to hook up the meter directly to the Mixer as in your first and second diagrams. If you hook up the meter between the amp and the speakers bad things are likely to happen. Since the mixer only has unbalanced output, hooking the decibel ...


3

Note that the Zoom H4n can record 24 bit samples. If you set your input level so that the loudest sound peaks at half your available headroom, your recording will effectively use 23 bits. That's still plenty of bits left if you plan to downsample to 16bits for your finished product. Unless you are looking for the coloration of a specific limiter or preamp, ...


3

If you have enough time in advance you could pick up a cable tester that has a tone generator in it for about $20. Here's one. Pull it into the studio, run it through your mixer, and mark the point at which its output = -20 dbfs. It'll probably be close to unity gain. Then when you're out in the field you can just plug the tester into the mixer, set the ...


3

If you look at the information on the web page you linked to, this is by design: Channels one and two have independent gain trims, while channels three and four are configured as a stereo pair at the level and pan controls. and The MultiMix 4 USB mixer has four input channels, all of which can accept a 1/4" line input. You can can plug XLR ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible