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34

In The Old Days... Prior to the invention of electronic calculators, multiplying and dividing long numbers was rather painful. But that's something engineers (including audio ones) had to do quite often. Logarithms were invented in the 17th century to simplify calculations. We know these fundamental rules of logarithms: log(X * Y) = log(X) + log(Y) ...


12

First, I think we should probably address the concept of volume. The level of a signal has nothing to do with volume. You don't have volume until it is actually put through speakers and you are a hearing it a certain distance from those speakers. Instead you have a "level". The level is a measure of signal strength and it isn't subjective, but rather ...


11

What is 0 dB in digital audio? 0dB does actually represent the largest signal that a digital system can produce. Once a signal is in the digital domain it takes on a life of its own and 0dB remains full-scale. If you took a digital audio file (maybe from a CD or wav file) and loaded it onto another machine, the new machine would see the same binary numbers ...


6

In simplest terms, the gain is used to adjust the strength (i.e. voltage level) of the signal, whether that be within the electrical components of the mixing board, within the software DAW, signal sent to magnetic tape, etc. Volume, on the other hand, is used to adjust the loudness of the signal as you perceive it, whether that is through speakers, or ...


5

The difference between clip gain and volume automation is basically INPUT volume and OUTPUT volume. Clip gain is the input volume. This data is read and taken into account before insert effects, sends, volume automation, eft. Here are two examples : if you crank up the clip gain you could potentially clip your audio. If it Wasn't clipping while you were ...


5

Since the dB is a ratio as you say, "0 dB" just means "no change". In the context of digital sampling, I'd consider 'full scale' to be the reference point -- i.e. 255 in an 8-bit system -- making anything less a negative dB value. But unless it's specified, (as in dBa, dBm etc) it's just speculation and open to interpretation. There may be a DWS standard or ...


5

I'd say your basic tenet is sound, in so much as if it's too loud it will feed back - however, if there is a clearly-identifiable frequency at which the feedback occurs [assuming by that time you have no option of moving mic or speakers etc], then the next step would be to cut that frequency, allowing you to retain the overall apparent volume. Another thing ...


4

Most Condensor Microphones have a "pad" switch (usually -15 or -20 db). That will decrease your input volume, allowing for you to turn your gain up and have greater ability to fine-tune. Also, most mixers have a "pad" switch or button as well, and this will do the same thing. However, I have never encountered a condenser microphone producing such a ...


4

If I understand correctly, you are currently using your mixer's gain knob very close to it's minimum gain position, and you'd prefer to be in a middle position. This means that the output level of your microphones is close to the max input level of your mixer's inputs. Possible workaround (depending on your specific equipment) : There might be an ...


4

It is the amount of change. 0dB is full signal, negative dBs are a reduction in signal (down to -infinity which is fully off) and +dB are when a signal has a gain applied. 0dB is also sometimes called Unity. This is consistent across digital mixing and analog mixing where anything below 0dB is reductive (the source signal is reduced) and anything above ...


4

The gain pot does itself (more or less) exactly the same thing as a volume pot, with one important difference: it's located at the very front-end of the circuitry. So it does not only control the output level, but more so the level the signal will have in the circuit. This may not seem necessary as most amplifier circuits are (more or less) designed to work ...


4

You've probably already figured this out, but in case you haven't… We are working on a project now where the picture department has used a lot clip gain. We needed to get out of that mode and into more standard volume graphing. Then we discovered under Edit>Automation the Coalesce clip gain to volume automation command (not in front of PT right now, so that ...


3

Hmmm....there's potential. I don't know about in a daisy-chain configuration, but maybe it would work in a [source > distributed network > summed signal] configuration. I will confess to having no direct experience with what I'm about to descrie; it's only something I've read about. Because of the random quality of Brownian Noise, a signal that gets split, ...


3

First of all, isn't it the mixers job to "level" the dialog? Second, you can just convert clip gain to volume automation, and then copy all of the volume auto into the Trim plugin. Third, you could wait for the update of Pro Tools that will fix this issue, but who knows when that will come out…


3

It sounds like your problem is that you are delivering to someone who isn't capable of running PT10 currently, yet they are tasking you with using a function of PT10 specifically to do your dialog edit. Is that correct? With the current bug in PT10 regarding rendering clip gain your options are to do what you are doing or: A: Lose the handles and "...


3

Pro Tools 10.3 (just released) should have solved this bug. not installed yet, so I just report the fix from the read me: Plug-Ins and Processing Audio sync issues when rendering clip gain on clips with crossfades have been resolved. (PTSW-170425) As others already wrote, I usually convert all the clip gain to Volume automation (watch out for 12 db gain ...


3

If the dailies across the board are like that, yes, I'll drop trims on all the tracks as necessary to get them to a -18 to -12 level (so as to leave my volume automation at unity). It's a sort of "re-calibration" of the dialogue track of sorts so the faders aren't having to sit way up at +12. Although I would be very suspicious of those dailies if they ...


3

Yeah, that happens eventually. I've been working with SM57s in live and studio setups for 15 years. In particular the ones used in live setups, which are used both indoor and outdoor, wears faster. I experience reduced gain, loss of low end and "dynamics". This is due to the membrane and edge hardening and dirt/corrosion in the coil hole. There is not much ...


3

0dBFS 1kHz sine defines a peak value. Alignment of audio levels is usually done at an RMS level of -18dBFS or -20dBFS depending on the standard you are applying. The line level alignment level that the amplifier will use depends entirely on the manufacturer. For the sake of argument, let us consider that the alignment level is -18dBFS. -18 dBFS = 0 dBu = ...


2

Everyone has a different approach, and you'll probably hear a few of them from other folks on this site. The one common thing you'll hear, is that there is no rule that applies in every situation. What gear are you using? What's your sound source? Where is the mic positioned? How will the sound be used once you get it back into the studio? What type of sound ...


2

Going to next level… Sound pressure level (SPL), in dB, uses the threshold of human hearing as the reference level (denominator): A fluctuating pressure of 2x10^-5 Pascals. I’d have to dig for the citation, but that reference was determined by averaging the response of healthy individuals (ears) back in the 1930’s(???). So, 0 dB is the threshold of human ...


2

tl;dr: digital has no headroom. 0dB is the max. this is the European kind. USA digital is 2dB hotter. give it a bit of time, it will start to make sense. from here


2

I've no experience with this type of gear, but functionality depends on the use-case. This device (and there are several others available with similar function) is mostly useful on ribbon and dynamic mics. But in most cases, as a sound designer or sound engineer, those types of mics are used on loud objects (drums, guns, explosions, cars). If you want to ...


2

You are talking about perceived loudness. This is quite unlike peak level. What you can do is measure the perceived loudness for all your songs and then adjust the gain accordingly. The best way currently available to measure perceived loudness is using the R128 standard. I hope you're on a Mac, because then you can use this free commandline tool: https://...


2

Many people confuse two similar controls: GAIN control adjusts the amount of amplification in the first stage of the microphone preamp. It is used to "normalize" the amount of signal coming from various kinds of microphones. Some mics are very sensitive and need lower gain, and some are less sensitive and need higher gain. Gain controls typically do NOT go ...


1

The basic tenet is sound, the difference is experience. Feedback occurs when a particularly frequency of a sound is loud enough out of a sound source (such as a monitor) that it is picked up by a microphone that is feeding that sound source. This results in a loop that increases that frequency and turns it in to a constant tone. To prevent this, we must ...


1

Lots of lengthy answers here when all that is needed is a simple answer. The 0dB that you refer to is actually 0dBFS which stands for dB with reference to "Full Scale". 0dBFS is the highest peak digital sample level. Anything below this is normal signal, therefore shown as a negative number. -20dBFS is 20dB Below Full Scale.


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