11

If you're not using any aftermarket audio hardware, and just recording from the line-in on the computer, you already have the bare minimum to record two channels at once. That line-in is likely stereo, i.e., a left channel and a right channel. Or, more appropriately for your purposes, a 2-channel input. Microphones are all mono (save a few specialty ...


6

Several points are to be considered : PC output vs dedicated Audio Interface output A PC will output consumer line level. A dedicated interface will output either consumer line level or professional line level, or both. The quality of a dedicated interface will probably be better than the default sound chipset of a consumer PC. The difference might not be ...


5

Can you be more specific about the specific features you need? The quick answer is the Apogee One and Duet. They are more expensive than a used MOTU 828 mk2, but have a stellar reputation. There are also plenty of high quality single channel USB interfaces designed for plugging into a single microphone. The Blue Icicle comes to mind immediately, but you ...


5

"Power" isn't really the issue. Certainly, most interfaces can offer enough wattage to cause ear damage, theoretically. However, the actual power is not determined by the HP-output alone, but by the headphones' own impedance as well: if it's substantially larger than the output impedance, then P = U2 / Z where U is the (RMS) output voltage of the ...


4

Your options are either a dual mono to stereo adapter like JoshP mentions, using an area mic that could pick up you and your friend at the same time, or if you want the best possible quality, get a cheap USB Audio Interface (~$100 or so) and a couple of lapel mics or even just simple mics like SM58s (~$100 each or less if you go used). It's a bit more of an ...


4

The S/PDIF I/O on the Saffire Pro 24 is stereo. The Optical is an 8-track ADAT input. The use case for using the S/PDIF I/O would be for using a digital stereo source or destination. You could use put an outboard digital effects processor in that loop, or say, get audio from a separate digital recorder into your computer, or bounce a stereo mix out to a ...


3

The primary reason is for people working in music production who prefer to mix on consoles instead of "in the box."


3

The problem with running multiple audio interfaces simultaneously is that the drivers typically won't work. Even if they do, audio applications often are designed to work with a single interface at a time. If you are running OS X, you can aggregate audio interfaces together to appear as a single large interface. The problem with aggregation, either using OS ...


3

Behringer UCG102 is one of the cheapest guitar interfaces for PC/MAC. It costs a little over £20 but not that much. However I'd advise against buying the cheapest interface. If you can't afford anything better at the moment, than I suggest to save some money and then buy the better interface. Otherwise after playing for couple of weeks it may turn out that ...


3

It is worth using an audio interface if you want to maximize sound quality, however you can also get by just fine with your built in sound card for a while if you want to save for a better interface. The #1 difference between a professional audio interface and a built in consumer sound card is the quality of the DAC or Digital to Analog Converter. ...


3

It's generally expected that you do a little bit of research before asking questions here and that you only ask one question. In this case the manual for this device answers the question quite clearly. The Amp Out provides a 1/4 inch mono output of guitar processed with amp modeling and effects and optimized for connecting to the input of a guitar ...


3

Correct - a separate amplifier is not needed to record keyboard. Just about any decent quality 2 channel interface will do. For example look at the Lexicon Alpha Studio (about $60) - on the front you have an instrument input suitable for guitar and bass, on the rear you have stereo (L and R) line in, ideal for keyboard. Moreover there is a mic input too (...


3

I've managed to get consistent results now! ~7ms with 128 samples, ~4ms with 64 samples @ 44100 Hz. I had Audio Out connected into Audio Mic Input port. Now it is connected from Audio Out into Audio Stereo Input. (i'm not sure why that made the difference, or if the measurements are reliable) Update: Out of curiosity, to make sure that CEntrace tool is ...


3

I had the same problem with my Mbox 3 pro, and concluded that there's a conflict between drivers when you use your interface for both windows and your DAW. Install the original drivers, try disabling your sound card as the default audio device in Windows (just let the Windows sound card as your default one) and use it only with your DAW.


3

I'm not sure who sold you that XLR to 1/4" cable, but it flat out isn't right. XLR is a balanced signal, which means it has 3 different conductors. The 1/4" connector it is adapting to only is a Tip/Sleeve connector which only provides 2. Additionally, the levels between a microphone and a guitar are completely different and not really compatible. With ...


2

There is no benefit to connecting your audio interface to your computer via S/PDIF if you can already make a good Firewire connection. Some additional detail: The big problem with S/PDIF is that it lacks any form of flow control. That means that the sender sends bits out, and the receiver receives them. There is no way for the receiver to request a ...


2

First, make sure the head of your "new" 424 is in good shape. Tape heads can go out of alignment, which will significantly reduce the quality of the signal you are able to get our of your tape. Next, even if you can get your system to recognize a pair of 2-channel recorders (easier on OS X with its Aggregate Devices than on Windows), they still won't be ...


2

Give ASIO4ALL a shot. There's a good chance you can use it to run both your interfaces with the same audio driver, to use the outs of your internal and ins of your external in any of your software. http://www.asio4all.com/


2

Go with the audio interface. The "mixer" borders on useless. It is basically just a cheap interface with some near useless features worked in to it. You are paying for unused features rather than an audio interface that includes a clean pre-amp and quality ADC. You want an audio interface for your purposes. The reason to go with a mixer would be if you ...


2

Depends on the interface. Normally something like this would be handled by a sync cable and a clock generator that establishes a common clock across devices. This is only available on higher end interfaces though. Using an external clock and sync cables is the only way I know of for reliable shared timecode on multiple distinct devices. Your other option ...


2

I've made this For about $6 total. It's a simple impedance matcher that allows you to use your own sound card. If you feel like tinkering, you can't really get cheaper than this. The quality is okay-ish, and could certainly be improved by fiddling with the capacitance a bit and adding more shielding. For anything more serious, I'm using a modelling unit; ...


2

Old question, I know. Use an USB isolator like this: Less than 10 dollars on aliexpress. What it does: Isolate ground (lift ground) on the USB connection with isolated DC/DC converter to eliminate ground loop/noise.


2

I would keep the source (keyboard) loud, turning recorded strip in the DAW mixer down. It gives you flexibility during the mixing/mastering stages. If you record low signal in, it would take you a lot of gain staging later on to boost the signal up if needed. Besides noise to signal ratio would be to big. Recording loud signal however gives you far better ...


2

I'm only guessing the amp out is meant to go to a guitar amp, so it's probably mono and has a level and impedance more like an electric guitar would have. Line 6 got started with guitar effects, so this almost certainly is there to allow you to use your computer and this interface as a virtual effects pedal board. The optical out is an output from the ...


2

Imagine a professional mix engineer who has just started playing guitar asking you "How can I play guitar as well as Tom Morello or Pat Metheny?" You would probably see at least 5 - 10 years of practice in their future to be able to play guitar at a professional level, if not much more (20 years?). You are in the reverse position. Creating a professional ...


2

Focusrite support have confirmed to me that this hardware does not support outputting to 2x2 channels using normal WDM audio drivers - this means no 4-channel output for YouTube, for example. Any application which can use the ASIO drivers can have complete control over all four channels, for example, a DAW. However, you can use a software which acts as a ...


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