13

Snagged from Beyer-Dynamics website: The impedance is determined by the voice coil (dynamic headphones), which is a winded copper wire (coated to avoid a short-circuit). This copper wire is available in nearly every length, but not in every gauge (thickness) and a thicker wire has less resistance than a thin wire ("less fits through"). The ...


10

The best course I can recommend is to use the best tools and resources you have available. Headphones are not ideal, but they're better than bad speakers, and probably better than even good speakers in a bad listening environment. A lot depends on what you're mixing and what the target environment will be. Mixing music or voice that will mainly be consumed ...


5

The point is to have the necessary frequency response or usual power output requirements well within the nominal spec for the product, thus minimising distortion or other unwanted non-linearity. With microphones the point is also to provide extended frequency response to recordists who plan on manipulating the sounds later. With audio software plugins ...


5

Does more impedance mean less volume ? As to impedance, take a look at Bill Griddle's answer: https://video.stackexchange.com/questions/650/what-is-the-effect-of-impedance-on-headphone-sound-quality In essence: yes, higher impedance = lower volume. But higher volume is not necessarily better quality. Most professional headphones has a high impedance. Are ...


5

While I think that the question isn't really the exact cup of tea for this stack exchange, I will try to on the other answer. Assumption is that the noise in the cafe makes it difficult for you to work because of two factors: It has human conversation It has random but reasonably loud noises. Both these factors cause your brain to take notice of the ...


5

If you are using decent in-ears, then the genre really shouldn't matter. A decent set of in-ears will drop the noise level by about 20 to 30db and at that point any music played at a comfortable level should drown out the noise entirely (even if you are on a jet it should come close to drowning it out). If you are using ear-buds rather than in-ears I would ...


5

how far away? is your macbook air connected to speakers? Your file has a "loudness" (RMS level) -> player volume (gain) -> system volume (gain) -> audio interface voltage specs (gain/level) -> amp (gain) -> speakers (sensitivity). So it's impractical to try and "compute" it with that many variables. Grab an SPL meter. There are SPL meter smartphone apps ...


5

Most people have difficulty hearing 18 kHz, except at very loud levels. Quite possibly, even with perfectly flat transmission, you'd have trouble hearing that frequency while the voice level remains bearable. Now, partly because the very high-end is hard to hear, hifi speakers tend to boost them quite a bit so as to sound particularly "crisp" – not ...


5

"Power" isn't really the issue. Certainly, most interfaces can offer enough wattage to cause ear damage, theoretically. However, the actual power is not determined by the HP-output alone, but by the headphones' own impedance as well: if it's substantially larger than the output impedance, then P = U2 / Z where U is the (RMS) output voltage of the ...


4

The root issue is one of physics, mixing should always and only be done on monitors. Low frequencies = larger waveform = more distance/time/space required for the frequency to develop audibly (read: montitors in a room). Air between your ears and the cones are what's necessary to properly evaluate mix decisions. No real way around that, even with some ...


4

Personally, I would be very careful making a decision based on these graphs. At least have an extensive listening test to find out how what you think the graph says translates into what you hear. Your ears don't have a flat frequency response, and it's notoriously difficult to measure the frequency response of headphones in an absolute way that transfers ...


4

It is a good idea to avail yourself to as many different listening environments as possible. As others have mentioned, higher quality monitors and higher quality listening environments will allow for more precise control. However, unless your end user will be listening in that same high quality environment, some of that precision will be lost to the ...


4

An amplifier works by multiplying the voltage of your audio source(CD, TV, etc...). When this voltage is applied to a load, such as a pair of headphones, then a current runs though the pair of headphones in relation to V=IZ where Z is the impedance. An ideal amp would maintain the exact same voltage regardless if the load is connected or not. However ...


4

Ears are not a very good tool for sound measurement. I would spend a couple of bucks on a sound analyzer app for your phone - I have SignalSpy on the iPhone - and set it to spectrum analysis. Hold the microphone near your headphones and "listen" to the sound. You should see a nice spike in the spectrum: something like this Sound was generated with ...


4

Uh oh, don't do that... the stereophonic inversion police aren't up for any fun... Truth is, many headphones are designed almost symmetrical, so if you turn them around and flip the stereo channels you get exactly the same experience. Flipping the channels is easy enough if you're working with a mixing console. In consumer devices there's seldom such an ...


3

Sennheiser HD650's Ultimate Ears In-Ear Reference Monitors What you should totally wear on the street.


3

While I agree with Jim, to use the best tools you can, I always recommend headphones, if for no other reason to isolate what you're recording from the background noise. You have no idea how many times I've not heard the applicance running in the background until I had my headphones on. Alternately, you may hear a lawnmower outside, but only upon wearing ...


3

According to a review by Ken Rockwell on the DT 880, the only real difference between the 32, 250 and 600 ohm versions was how loud you are able to play them. http://kenrockwell.com/audio/beyer/dt-880.htm He even plugged in the 600 ohm version to an iPod and said it got plenty loud but it was practically at max volume.There is no reason to think that the ...


3

You need some software that implements Binaural Synthesis. The first such application I found on Google was "Amphiotic Synthesis", however I have not tried it for myself.


3

Have a look on stage audio sales sites for 'wireless monitors' - there is a huge range. The cost may be a little high, but generally the bandwidth on these devices is very good.


3

This is a common complaint people have with Grados, due to the on-ear (as opposed to over-ear) design. You can try flexing the headband out a bit to loosen its grip on your head, you can try replacing the earpads with a different material, or you can simply get used to it over time. Alternatively, you can switch to over-ear headphones such as similar ...


3

It is true that the sensitivity of our ears varies based on frequency and that high pressure sound can be more damaging without being noticed, but if you are not listening too loud it shouldn't be a problem. You just need to be really careful that it isn't actually too loud. It is possible to damage your hearing without feeling any pain when you are using ...


3

I dont think this is particularly a Sound Design question in the first place, but I would point out that there can be considerable differences between any two different equalisers (hardware or software) in the first place, so the notion that settings for 'an' EQ might be studied, rather than the more consistently measureable frequency content of music, seems ...


3

I don't think you will find any research in to what EQ settings will make a difference. There may be certain frequency groups that help, but EQs just apply adjustments to what is already there though and countless other things have more of an impact. Pacing of the music, how busy the music is, how complete the "wall of sound is", tempo, style, volume, etc ...


3

You have a few options, 1) you can buy a 1/8 or 1/4 inch headphone jack and short the L R connections together since (in an unbalanced situation (most regular headphones)) they share a common ground. Keep in mind you will be driving twice the load from the same source which will effect the output. 2) You can buy a headphone amplifier that has a mono ...


3

Radio Shack sells male and female audio connectors in a variety of sizes/formats, including the 3.5 mm type. Take care with your soldering to minimize the effect on sound quality.


3

Probably, yes. "Headphone power" depends basically on two things, output voltage and headphone impedance (I discussed it in some detail here). Many devices don't bother providing a very great voltage, but for dedicated headphone amps it's pretty much expected that they can make any off-the-shelf headphones loud enough for all typical use cases. Still, if ...


3

There are some characteristics for low and high impedance headphones - but these are not to be taken as universal truths (you'll find excellent sounding low impedance headphones and horrible sounding high impedance headphones and visa versa). However let us generalize a few characteristics: High Impedance (above 100 ohms) Typically has more windings in ...


3

Working on headphones for a 5.1 mix is not a good idea. Nevertheless, what you might be looking for is a 5.1 to binaural renderer. An example of such a product can be found here : http://smyth-research.com/technology.html What I would suggest is doing most of the job (editing, premixing stems, filtering, etc.) on a stereo monitoring system (therefore ...


3

There's no inherent risk in prolonged use of headphones provided the volume is kept at reasonable levels (at least according to my otorhinolaryngologist). Aural isolation is not a problem, on the contrary, the protection from environmental noise provides a rest to the ears that can be beneficial. Another thing is the tiredness caused by intensive ...


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