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frequencies above what microphone allows Microphones have a frequency response curve. This is a random example: The exact shape of the diagram is different for each microphone, but they all have one thing in common: the response will be as close to flat as possible in the range we're usually interested in (20 Hz- 20 kHz for full-range audio microphones), ...


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Referencing both manuals for the Snowball Blue Microphone (and this manual) which provide similar information with different descriptions of the settings, this switch controls the pickup pattern, Position 1, Setting: Cardioid (capsule), Applications: speech, vocals, podcasting Picks up sound from the front, ideal for podcasting, game streaming or recording ...


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Rode has now a device which allows to plug in microphones which need to be powered by power usually provided by smartphones (2.7v) through TRRS such as Rode's Lavalier Go or Shure's MVL/A to a USB sound card or any mic entry using XLR. This is Rode VXLR+. The XLR has to provide 12-48V phantom power. From Rode's site: The VXLR+ is a 3.5mm female TRS ...


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For this sort of application you probably want a mixing desk that can handle automixing - something like a Yamaha QL-1 which has an in-built Dugan Automixer. This will significantly help with the noise-floor. Also you need to look and see how the mics are being used. IF the microphones are a long way from the subjects, then you will definitely get noise ...


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