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8

What you have is too much bass bouncing off the walls. You've created what are called standing waves in your room, which is very common. When there is a standing wave for any frequency, some spots in the room will have almost none of that frequency audible and other spots will have almost double. When you move around, you pass through both kinds of places. ...


5

A lot of Foley artists use sweat pants, soft clothes that don't make sound when rubbing together. Also take off any jewely, belts, etc.


5

shorts and a t shirt, to minimize clothing noise when doing a foot pass. clothing moves can be added separately. pants swishing noise can build up when doing multiple passes of feet.


4

It depends. If I know for sure there are no way anyone would see me, and I'm in my own studio - tee and boxers. In extreme cases also a thick Palestinian scarf (textured with skulls and crossbones for that extra audio push!) covering my mouth and nose to further reduce the risk of accidental breaths or such. But mostly I use a tee washed with a lot of ...


3

A couple of things to add on; If you are djing, then I assume you won't be sitting by your computer?? The way you describe it, it does sound like standing waves. If you are to produce, then you should get correctly set up. Using headphones with a flat response can help you get an idea of how your monitors should sound. Bear in mind that while producing ...


3

If you're using the set up purely for mixing in the DJ sense, as you've indicated, then it doesn't particularly matter how you position things. I'd suggest you go with your gut preference and what gives you what you feel you need to hear. However, you will find it an advantage to learn to mix in a variety of monitoring situations, the monitoring in DJ booths ...


2

Yes, you will certainly have a change of sound in the new room and this may or may not be a bad thing. Whether or not adding a carpet/rug is a good idea will depend on several factors, the most prominent being the acoustic properties of the ceiling. If you have a flat and particularly reflective ceiling, some form of carpet/rug would almost definitely be a ...


2

Fender Stratocaster (or other twangy sounding guitar, anything with a single coil pick up should do), through a compressor, DI into your DAW, then apply light digital delay in post production. You will need to find some one to play the part though.


2

It's not going to be possible for less than tens of thousands of dollars. Even if you have free reign to modify the building as needed, it's still generally easily 5 to 10 grand just to soundproof a room well. In order to do that when you can't modify the building extensively, you'd basically have to build your own isolated room and then soundproof that. ...


2

Is the compression applied correctly? It sounds like you are applying compression to the overall signal rather than just the guitar. In that case, if the secondary instrument gets louder, it could trigger the compression of the entire signal resulting in a reduction in the signal level of everything else going in to the compressor that was at static level. ...


1

XLR and TRS are two different things. XLR is a "balanced" audio cable, which means that it sends the signal in such a way that the noise picked up while traveling over the cable can be canceled out by comparing two different signals on the cable. TRS, on the other hand, is used for a slightly wider array of things. It can be used for unbalanced stereo ...


1

Assuming that the same type of cable is used with either configuration, there will be no sound quality difference. The plug type makes no difference to the fact that there are essentially three electrical connections that need to be made.


1

One solution would be a pair of unbalanced (TS) 1/4" cables of a length which permits desired speaker separation, and a pair of unbalanced 1/4" barrel adapters. (female-female). Connection should be pretty self-explanatory.


1

I was first going to write a long answer with all permutations on how you could hook everything up, in multiple configurations. However, this would be a very long answer, and would probably complex the matter in regards to the choices you need to make. The positive thing is that you have a good audio interface, which will do most of what you want. The ...


1

Just to clarify, I believe you are saying that you have a laptop, and a USB audio interface that goes from USB to a pair of 1/4" balanced outputs (TRS). You are now about to buy some monitors and want to know if they will work with your current setup. Assuming that your monitors have balanced inputs of some kind (either XLR or 1/4" TRS), they should work ...


1

Yes Yes I don't have a lot of experience with lots of different models, so maybe focusrite would be decent one to look at, and it's not too expensive. Behringer bcf2000 would be the cheapest way (behringer will soon release new controllers that might be suitable for you, called x-touch..google)...thou be careful, behringer stuff is not the most robust ...


1

its Elaborinth8993. What I am suggesting might not be what you are looking for, but it would produce the best sound quality for what you need. I may be going over the top with what I think you need, but it can be easily scaled back to fit what you actually need. First thing you would need that I do not know you own is a mixing board. something like this ...


1

You might find that the natural resonant frequency of the new room is more pronounced and this could be annoying. It will tend to occur below about 200 Hz and can give a booming effect. Resonance and reverberation go hand in hand but to get bad effects you need reflections off all sides of the room. This causes a sustained resonance that can be a real pain. ...


1

speaker monitoring is as much about the room as it is about the speakers. Cheap monitors can still give decent mixes in good sounding rooms, and excellent monitors will still lie to you in poorly treated rooms - especially in the low end. headphones will lie to you with regards to relative balances and stereo fields - even good ones - because you're ...


1

Good headphones for sure over bad monitors. When I worked on God of War 2, I hated the Genelec 1029's that Sony had set my room up with. I tried to use them for over a year and just could not get used to them. So, I gave up and designed most of God of War 2 using my Sennheiser HD600 headphones. These days, it is the total opposite. I am very happy with ...


1

I can recommend the Studio Project B1 as a low Budget solution and the Neumann TLM 103 (= U87 with only cardoid pattern) as a high cost alternative. Both Mics do have a nice Volume in the lower frequencies and a boost at around 2000-3000 Hz which automatically leads to a "easy to understand recording". Also both Mics have a very natural frequency response ...


1

Certainly, the very first thing you will want to get is a decent audio interface. Note that an audio interface includes a DAC for each output and an ADC for each input. A DAC is used for output and wouldn't help with your capture (it goes from digital to analog, you need the other way around for capture.) A mac isn't necessary at all. They tend to be ...


1

One thing to mention are Digital Mixing consoles, like Presonus. They are a mixer + preamp + sound card. So it allows you too easily record multiple instruments right into usb. The great thing about digital mixing descs is the easy usability, inbuilt fx and more important they do not color your sound. Which is important imho because cheap analogue gear ...


1

It depends on how you use it and the intent. You will get the most versatility and flexibility by recording your signal with no processing and then adding processing later. If you go this path, you may find that even inexpensive plug ins may provide more of the sound you desire than than the Voicelive 2. I find the Voicelive 2's reverb to sound thin and ...


1

There is no proper amount of acoustic treatment for a room. It depends on what kind of room sound you're going for. If you're going for a dead room, then no, there is no limit. If you're going for anything else, then yes, there is a limit. If you're not sure, there are two ways to approach it: Experiment... see what you like. How does the room sound ...


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