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Hi Aural Chef, I too was looking at the H4n (among other things) but ended up getting the H2n. I have to say that IMO the H2n is the handier of the two for field recording with the potential for surround recording (which for me is sometimes useful) or the MS, which can be recorded in Raw Mode for later decoding, which again for me is also useful. While ...


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While the Zoom recorders and all those of the same echelon are mot the same as a Sound Devices or FR2, I strongly believe somethig which either Jay or Tim mentioned, which is that the best recorder is the one you have on you (in the same vain that the best mic for the job is the one in your hand). I started out using an H4n and rven though I've since ...


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A small portable recorder like the Zoom H4n or any other the similar devices will do the trick. Getting enough level won't be an issue - it's what recorders (and the preamps) are designed to do. Sound like you're doing more a radiojournalism style thing. This NPR page might be a good resource for you. It's a bit dated since it talks about DAT recorders - so ...


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You need a 2 mono to 1 stereo 3.5 adapter. (As it seems the input of the Zoom H1 is a 3.5 mm female jack). This is not a Y combiner. That is a cable with 2 female mono 3.5 mm jack to 1 male stereo 3.5 jack. For example :


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For what it's worth I've used an RE20 on an H4n and it sounded just fine. The fact that the website claims the H4n has great quality mics, and seems to make some other questionable claims on other recorders, I'm not entirely sure the information on that site is worth putting a whole lot of trust in. You run into potential output level issues with ...


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I've used both but I own a DR-100mkII and for me it is definitely the better choice. The pre's are much better and I like the added features such as the omni mic's. For me, one of the biggest differences is the gain control - with the DR-40 you cannot get around the button noises when changing gain. I used to hate listening back to the recordings and hearing ...


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I have the Tascam DR40 and I must say its pretty good. Its in a lot of ways similar to the Zoom H4N, but is comparatively cheaper. I have used both, DR100 and DR40 and sound quality wise I feel there's not much of a difference between the DR100 and the DR40. Just that the DR100 has more functions (sometimes it feels that its more than what you actually need)....


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The key difference is calibration: a hand held sound meter, even a cheap one, has been calibrated in the factory. Your app and phone (microphone, internal preamp, dac) aren't. If you find a way to calibrate your app - most apps have a calibration setting - using a reference sound source or a calibrated SPL meter, you can improve the usefulness of those apps. ...


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Obviously the preamps and the A/D converters. Some say, devices differ in terms of phantom power, but I don't know about that. Also be aware that of the mentioned recorders only the H4n has XLR inputs. For the other ones you would need adapters and/or an additional mixer. In using a mixer e.g. a Sound Devices MixPre in the signal chain, you would have good ...


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There are several variables here. First of all, the preamps can have a lot of impact. Bad preamps may result in more noise, distorted sound, etc. The phantom power can also affect the sound; not enough current or power can affect the performance of the microphone. The AD converter inside the device can also affect the sound, although how much of this is ...


1

Every piece of gear will add its own self noise to a system. Whether that noise is perceptible is another question which depends a lot on the gear, what you're recording, and the settings you're using. For example, if you're recording a very loud source (eg. A rock concert) you won't need to set your gain very high and so less self noise will be added. If ...


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My low cost solution was to buy a Sound Devices MixPre-D to use with my iPad3: http://sonicskepsi.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/ipad3-♥-mixpre-d-♥-auria/ Hope this helps!


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We have a Deva 5.8 at work, and overall it's a great piece of gear. My biggest gripe with the 5.8, and I assume the 5 will have the same issue, is that it's a bitch to get the data off of it. Unlike the Sound Devices gear, it cannot act as an external hard drive with your computer (though I think there may be an adapter you can buy now that let's you do that....


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I own the GoPro HD Hero2 camera and to be honest: it's a fun camera, but the actual quality is not that good as you might think at first. The material is hard to grade, it tends to get noisy, doing recordings underwater gives you condensed water on the lens, etc.,etc. Nevertheless I still like it. That said, I think a cheap Zoom H2n is actually kinda the ...


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Rather late to the party... I have no personal experience but, since I was just researching this subject, I'd like to share this rather nice and in-depth article I stumbled across: http://taperssection.com/index.php?topic=148631.0


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the D50 is a fantastic recorder if you can afford to buy it over the H4n, the mics don't sound any better and the noise floor fairly similar with both using XY electret mics which always exhibit noise, the D50 is a tad quieter but I doubt in real world scenarios you'll find yourself in a quiet room recording nothing with built in mics. the preamps in the H4n ...


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Very old post but for those having issues with wind noise I found a solution. I bought a rycote windjammer but found The mic was still picking up wind noise through the casing. Solution? I wrapped the body of the h1 in a cheap Cotten wool Santa beard. Even on a very windy day I don't pick up any wind noise at all. I can even use the mouth of the beard to ...


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Old thread, but anyway...I've been using the H4 and now H1, because of its portability, for interviews, ambient sound and simple video sequences. As a former radio producer i've also worked with more high-level (and definitely high-priced) gear. I've find the zoom series (I've also tried the H2) good when it comes to sound quality. And especially the H1 is a ...


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With the Tascam DR 100mk2 I got some good "interview" recordings with an SM 58. But I was really close to the source. If you are booming, you definately want a shotgun. If I were you, I would try to use my Phone as a recorder for you interviews. I think I used a NTG2 Rode Mic ("Battery powered shotgun") with my Iphone for good results there is a cheap ...


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I think the answer depends on your primary usage. I don't own an LS-100, but I've heard recordings made with it and they sound very good. My guess is that the built on mics need wind protection to be effective outdoors (as most handheld recorder's mics do) I do own a PCM M10 however, and I absolutely love it. The Sony's built on mics don't sound as ...


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I've got an M10 and I love it. As a handheld device, it has very little handling noise, which is great for spur-of-the-moment recording. I find it to be very low noise - definitely good enough for most ambiences. Here is a recording I did with the internal mics of the M10: https://soundcloud.com/hzandbits/french-outdoor-cafe-ambience I have often used ...


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Well the easiest and most expensive answer is buy a bag designed for the mixpre. Petrol has one: http://cvp.com/index.php?t=product/petrol_ps607 Cheers, Arnoud


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The King is the Sony M-10. It is cheap, has good sound, is quiet, batteries last forever, and you will actually use it because it is so small. It is what most people should buy instead of all the other junk they do buy...... The Prince is the Zoom H-1. It is silly cheap, is noisy, has somewhat acceptable sound, battery life is fair, and you will actually ...


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I think the PCM-D100 will be the king of all handheld recorders! I think most professional sound recordists realise that handheld recorders of this size with XLR inputs all fail with noisy preamps, they're all okay (tascam dr100mkii, zoom h4n) but they don't cut it, so you either keep using your big beast 744t or you pair a recorder with a mixer (mixpre-d/...


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The Sony D100 looks intriguing. From what I've read, it's due early 2014, and retails for $1000. The extra frequency range looks interesting. But it really depends on how the preamps will shape up, in my opinion. http://blog.sony.com/2013/10/sony-unveils-pcm-d100-high-resolution-audio-portable-recorder/ I love using the Sony D50. I also have a H4n and an ...


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There will be a new Sony PCM D100 in a few months….I love my M10 Superior quality ! Very low noise !! I personally would´t recommend the Nagra Lino. I read not very good about it. Sorry. Have no links about articles. I did a lot of research in the last werks because of my dead h4n and i went for the m10. Super long stand by, superfast boot up ( even with two ...


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I don't have one, but have heard good things. Of interest regarding the mic pre's: http://www.avisoft.com/recordertests.htm I'd like to hear a recording comparison with internal mics though too. Wondering how this compares to the pcm-d50 and ls-100 in that respect.


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Sony PCM-M10 . I don't think she'll need cardioids, if the point is to just record tangible conversations (for which the PCM-M10 is rather fine). A perhaps better (if mono recording is preferred) option for hand-held recording would be a mono microphone of some sort and a recorder with a XLR mic input. Then there's the H6 which has "...


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Plenty of good opinions here! I'm just going to pitch in that to my ears, it doesn't matter what features or mic configurations the Zoom H2n offers – because the quality of the microphones is poor. I've heard plenty of speech recordings rendered unusable by its harsh high frequencies and high mids. On paper, it looks amazing, but in practice I just don't ...


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