8

I think your client wants the original wav-file, instead of the mp3 you sent, for the final product. I only sent mp3's when sharing demo's. If the client is happy, I sent the wav files, because you don't want the final product to have another conversion to mp3.


5

Two things that can easily ruin quality, which you should avoid. First is room acoustics. Even the best microphone won't get you a good sound if it's placed in a room with strong echo resonances. If you can't record in a professionally treated studio, you should do it in a room with as neutral sound as possible – avoid exposed parallel walls. Record the ...


3

I'm not too familiar with Garage Band or Logic (I'm a Windows Cubase user), but your best bet is to simply record a child, but I'm assuming that's not an option. You can use just about any DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) to record your voice and using a blend of pitch shifting (shifting the lead vocal an octave or two down) and combining the newly modified ...


3

I think if the client requests a high quality recording he is trying to judge how much work he will have with the material you deliver. Essentially if your voice talent is good enough your customer will want to save as much as possible on recording and "post production". If you want to please this customer you should make this as easy as possible for him. I ...


2

It is partly due to the voice being mixed differently, but also comes from how the voice is recorded - controlled conditions in the studio, using a large diaphragm condenser with the actor close-in. Recording like this gives more bass and nice crisp highs in the tone of the voice. If you compare that to the way dialog on set is recorded - with a boom, from a ...


2

If you are willing to pay a little fee you could commission a recording. I haven't use the service before but I came across this service from the production of a video I saw. http://voicebunny.com


2

"Getting your toe in the door" for voice acting doesn't require equipment, it requires talent & tenacity. [It also isn't on-genre for this forum] If you want to become a voice-over or voice character actor, the biggest hurdle initially is not the quality of your recordings, it is the inherent quality of your voice; purely as suited to the ear of the ...


2

What are you looking for in a good voice? It fits the purpose or matches the character. If it sounds good, it's good. How do you prefer to record/edit a voice over? If it's recorded well with a good microphone then all you need to do is to crop the lines (so that you remove extra noises prior and after the voice take) and place the takes ...


2

There are tons of apps for this. From wikipedia: AthTek Free Voice Changer, Skype Voice Changer, AV Voice Changer Software Diamond 7.0, MorphVOX of Screaming Bee INC, Fake Voice Or maybe try Avox Mutator.


2

Assuming the recording and levels are good in the first place. I will almost always roll off lows and shelf the highs, even if its just a little. Human voices don't really have much below 120hz or above 12khz so get rid of it. Next I work low to high on the frequency band. It usually looks something like this: A lot of voices often have a specific ...


2

I will give you some feedback! I like long and constructive feedback so I will give that to you. One of the things I really liked was that bottle smash, really good job on that sound effect. I also like the underlying music tones at the beginning and the end of the trailer. Things I didn't care for is how everything sounded very close and could easily tell ...


2

Go with the audio interface. The "mixer" borders on useless. It is basically just a cheap interface with some near useless features worked in to it. You are paying for unused features rather than an audio interface that includes a clean pre-amp and quality ADC. You want an audio interface for your purposes. The reason to go with a mixer would be if you ...


2

Its a combination of a lot of things but mostly mic, position and performance are key. There are some things you can do in post but without the key ingredients you are limited. Post production is essentially glitter-rolling. Recording and performance are about making sure its not a turd you are rolling in glitter.


1

Yes, you should probably choose the quietest available space to record in. Set up your microphone in the same position each time. Use the same level settings. Perform the reading consistently. If you're getting popping p's and other breath noise, add a pop filter to your mic. A SM58 maybe isn't the ideal choice for this sort of work, but it'll do! As ...


1

Short of speech therapy, the realistic answer is no. If the problem was just lower frequency in the speech making it sound muddy then sure you can roll off the lower frequency, but from your description the problem is enunciation. There are not any mainstream techniques from the audio processing side of things to fix this other than dubbing over it. The ...


1

If you are unsatisfied with Audacity's ability to manipulate the voice, then the best software I can recommend where you can customize its capabilities are Csound, Max/MSP, and Kyma X. However, if pitch and formant shift isn't working for you, may I recommend a radio talk host approach? Get yourself a great microphone, for e.g. the ones used popularly in ...


1

Oh well, nevermind, I solved this issue. Actually a friend told me. I will write the answer here so if anyone else needs it they can find it. It's a simple setting. If you are using Windows 10, just go to the sound devices, go to the Recording tab and select the Default Format for recording as: 1 channel (and whichever bit depth and sample rate you want). ...


1

"Vocalization" rarely if ever refers to "actual coherent sentences": those would be called "singing" (admittedly, singing includes coloratura and other stuff somewhat remote from coherent sentences). However, vocalizations usually feature at least syllables in style of singing rather than "laughs, cries, grunts and other sounds of that sort". I don't know ...


1

Well... first things first: you have to mimic a football comentator of course. Maybe watch a couple of matches and see how their voices change, depending on the situation of the match. You'll notice that a lot of them have a very simmilar way of expressing excitement, tension and so on. Sendondly: From a sound engineering view, the right mic does a lot to ...


1

I'm listening on headphones in a relatively noisy environment... but I'll try my best to answer. The voice recording is mono, band limited and compressed/distorted. The background music is spectrally-rich and rich in stereo information too. With regards the stereo separation vs mono, your brain is doing much of the legwork here, Iggy! I don't think the ...


1

Yes, compressing twice is normally fine. In fact, as a tendency: the more compressing stages, the better – or rather: the less gain-reduction each compression stage applies, the better. One hard compressor will more likely sound unpleasant than two gentler ones. And in particular, compressing individual components before mixing results in a more ...


1

In an acoustically sterile environment tisks and such is a problem, but I usually give the actors apples and such to eat, if not eliminating it then at least lowering the problem. When i comes to cleaning up, I have no trust in plugins whatsoever in these cases. Too much artefacts, and no actual control of what to eliminate/keep - a lot of pops and ...


1

One option is live pitch-shifting plugin, for example Waves Ultrapitch - it can pitch up and down in realtime as well as shifting along the "formant" axis which can make the voice sound more nasally or more throaty. To set it up, you would just have to have your microphone feed routed through a DAW running the plugin; the delay that it induces is really ...


1

The better question is what does a parrot sound like to you? To me the most telling qualities of a parrot voice is the heavy inflections that might scale an octave (in my imagination at least, I dont own a parrot). Also maybe something to distort the sound a little, like a light distortion or ring mod. Maybe some EQ-ing to get rid of the bass in a humans ...


1

We use 'add lines' to describe anything that was added in post. Walla is used to describe anything in the background. Before we have the script for the 'add' lines we refer to them as TBW's (to be written). That way we know which lines in our ADR list need to be addressed.


1

"Loop Group" is another possibility.


1

Well, there's ADR (additional/automated dialogue replacement) Wildtracks, buzz track. In the states you often hear the term 'walla' to describe crown muttering or bg chatter of any kind. slug usually means a short section of sound often silence


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