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14

You're likely to find that artists that have basslines that stick out well on both proper studio monitors as well as crappy laptop speakers are utilizing a bunch of layering of sounds to create a cohesive bass sound that spans various frequencies (besides the low ones you'd expect). Even when I'm using a bass sound that is essentially a sub (sine wave) bass,...


13

I agree with @AJ Henderson explanation of "Wall of Sound" concept. I'd like to add one more perspective. Some years ago I've ran into a very interesting way to look at a mix. The concept was about thinking of your audio image as of actual 3D image. Where the space can be defined by following means: Right\left - panning\balance Up\Down - EQ Far\Close - Space ...


9

This is confusing panning with space in the "wall of sound". There are multiple dimensions to sound. At a minimum you have placement in terms of relative "volume." You also have the dimension of frequency from low to high frequencies. You also have left to right placement in a stereo mix and if you are doing surround, you may have additional axis that ...


8

Using a higher order filter will give you a greater roll-off slope in the filters stop-band. So a 1st order filter has a roll-off slope of -6db/octave, 2nd order filter has a roll-off slope of -12db/octave, 3rd order filter has a roll-off slope of -18db/octave, 4th order filter has a roll-off slope of -24db/octave, etc. This means the filter does not act ...


7

There are 5 stages/phases in a Album production: Recording > Editing > Mixing > Mastering > Printing. It's worth naming "Pre-production", which is before the 5 steps and can be very important to make things go better. Pre-production can be a wide variety of things. All from making the music arrangements, defining artist identity, vision, and intention; to ...


7

Part of the answer is the fact that the cut is almost entirely made up of short and percussive sounds. With no sustaining voices or long release times there is not much material to clutter the same frequency range at the same time. The few sustaining parts are pretty mid-range and appear to be heavily compressed. Also the use of effects is limited. Reverb is ...


6

The basics are thus: "What are the specifications of the broadcaster you're delivering to?" You're asking us to distill a very complex process down into a "paint by numbers" process. If it were that easy, there'd be a manual that anyone could follow. I'm not trying to be mean by saying this, only trying to give you an idea of the scope of the question you'...


6

David Farmer did an AMA on Facebook recently where he talked about some of this: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151753385296286&set=a.101318681285.104099.7513286285&type=1&theater David Farmer: It helps to start with a great performance which Benedict gave us in droves. His voice is arguably the best I've been able to work with. The ...


6

Your real problem is most likely recording technique and possibly the gear you're using. A good sound recorded properly doesn't need any EQ to sound professional. Where you place your microphone is the most important thing in capturing a sound and works just like EQing when in the right hands.


6

The only "natural" (i.e. "using only the data in the sample") way to change the pitch of a recorded sample is to change the speed of its playback. So a sample that sounds an octave lower should take twice as long to play back. But you have a tool that somehow manages to play that sample back octave lower, while somehow keeping the playback time the same. ...


6

I tend to go manual. When I'm editing VO, its just a matter of a fast breath cutting pass and then a separate pass of other editorial and mixing. For breath cutting, I'll make the waveform and the track very big so that I'm just looking at the softer stuff in the track (not worried about seeing peaks when breath editing) then i'll place my left hand on the ...


6

These days, what used to be referred to as "the holy grail of the misinformed" is getting closer to actuality. There are now applications designed to do exactly this task - isolate parts of a complete mix & allow you to change their relative levels; including total removal or isolation of sections such as vocals, drums, bass or 'instruments'. ...


5

To get the Kickdrum out of Laptopspeakers -> Layer a small click sound, rimshot, hi hat, etc. To get the Bass out -> layer it with saws or use parallel distortion or fm to get some higher harmonics out edit: also the right amount of white and pink noise can give the impression of a burst -> helps with those edm genres to give a big bass drop on small ...


5

Filtering a signal to remove certain parts of the spectrum on the face of it (and intuitively) should reduce the perceived sound level. This is what common-sense would tell us. However, when it comes to the reshaping of sound with filtering, lowering the sound level doesn't always equate to lowering the peak level. Yes, the perceived sound level may reduce ...


5

You can do a basic implementation manually in any daw: Copy the track Pan both tracks left and right respectively and symmetrically The dry channel should be around 18dB louder than the Haas channel Add a time delay of 13ms-~50ms to 'Haas' channel' Be careful how much Haas you use, it affects the tonality of the track when summed to mono. If you have ...


5

With headphones you will get complete separation of left and right channels. You will only hear the left channel in the left ear and the right channel in the right ear, assuming you don't listen at insane volumes or put the headphones on backwards :) With speakers, aside from the reverb and echos in the room mentioned by @Eugene, you will still hear at ...


5

Nice, a sound design question :) It's difficult to create a clear and not phasey ambience with water sounds, but in most cases it's a matter of less is more. How many different layers are you using and have you divided them up in 'tones' or 'colours'? A simple LF/MF/HF division can do a lot to keep things tidy.. and don't be afraid to use detailed trickles ...


5

I think it helps to play with the mix of water layers subtly so that the sound is always evolving. Lighter sounds on top of the the more body or base sounds and changing the mix up a little bit. Adding some higher frequency and unique content like some splashes or drops will also help it. Since your working in surround you should have a little more room ...


5

Back in the days of analog & vinyl, rolling off the extreme bass frequencies had three primary reasons . No-one would ever hear it the needle would tend to get thrown out of the groove with extremely low frequencies, especially if it wasn't centred, or was out of phase. There is far more energy needed to shift bass than treble, so the overall volume ...


5

What's notable about this mix is how it uses the stereo width. Only the lead synth (which has indeed quite a narrow frequency range with it's flute-like sound) and the bass parts are center, everything else is spread strongly to the sides. Not in the sense that instruments are panned hard left of right – that has been somewhat of a taboo since the 70's....


5

Here, is there any common low-end level that every song should has? No or Does it just set by ear? Yes. In fact, it should be set by ear, not by eyes. Don't bother with what the spectrum analyzer tells you, it is dumb and doesn't know or say very much. You have to listen for the right sounds. or Does it depend on the music genres? Definitely. Hip-...


4

Here is my choice: http://www.amazon.com/Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures-Invisible/dp/0240809181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361733846&sr=8-1&keywords=dialogue+editing+for+motion+pictures http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Art-Motion-Picture-Sound/dp/0240812409/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361733899&sr=1-1&keywords=practical+art+of+...


4

Heh. Welcome to the rest of your career. :) I fall more into the "client is always right" camp. I think it's my job to speak up when I disagree and educate the clients just as you have done but at the end of the day, they're the ones who have sweat blood over this film for months, if not years on end, and the director always always gets the last word. "...


4

There are tons & I'm sure you'll get lots of good examples, but I gleamed most of what I know from "Master and Commander". Everything is impeccable. ADR, Foley, Sound Design, & some of the best Mixing you'll ever hear. There's incredible attention paid to perspective & panning. Just watch the opening action sequence & you'll have to change ...


4

Proper stereo image is also important. One of the reasons many exterior BGs don't seem to work at first for interior locations is that they're too wide. If you pull them in quite a bit (maybe even mono all the way for some) it helps a lot. Same with distant car passes and the like.


4

The root issue is one of physics, mixing should always and only be done on monitors. Low frequencies = larger waveform = more distance/time/space required for the frequency to develop audibly (read: montitors in a room). Air between your ears and the cones are what's necessary to properly evaluate mix decisions. No real way around that, even with some ...


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