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6

"...voice is not convincing..." I believe you answered your own question. It's a performance issue, so the only true way to fix it is to start with a convincing voice performance first. The performance is key.


6

Use dynamic range compression. Set the threshold to kick in only on the louder voice, and adjust the ratio until the levels between the two voices match. Attack and release times of about 100ms should work.


5

Yes and no - there is no tool that does this fully automatic - you have to set up and tweak the chain your self, but once you're done it can be used with any input (i.e. "live"). (tl;dr: good impersonation -> pitch-shift w. formant control -> matching eq) Details Like you suggest yourself in one of the comments, you have to use a mix of both a good pitch ...


5

In addition to a little reverb (convolution reverbs are critical tools for sound for picture, IMHO), it will still sound like soundtrack music with extra reverb unless it is filtered. You could run it through a speaker emulator or guitar or bass amp plug-in, or you could do high and low pass filters along with a little high shelf. Instead of low pass + high ...


5

If you are on a budget you might want to give the Blue Microphones Yeti a try. It has switchable pick up patterns on it one of with it polar which will pick up 360 degrees around the mic. It's USB so it should be able to interface with Skype with no problem at all.


4

It may sound horrible, but try toying with using a reverb with an IR of glass or ice breaking/cracking. You can also do a lot with breath. When I create special voices like these I spend a lot of time augmenting or even replacing the breaths and exhales of the actor with custom effects depending on the character and his mock-up, in your case you could use ...


4

This is probably a bit too late, but I absolutely LOVE Reaper's ReaFir for noise reduction.


4

The basic principle is called double tracking. You can read a good introductory article here: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr09/articles/doubletracking.htm In the first example there is pitch difference and a strong spatial element being applied.


4

Personally, I prefer tutorials without music. I also think a bit of background noise is not an awful thing. Gated dialogue or over-baked noise reduction is far more distracting. Choosing a mic you can get close to, thereby increasing the signal to noise ratio will help a lot. Also consider building a makeshift sound booth to block some of the noise out.


4

Audacity has a Truncate Silence effect (Effect > Truncate Silence...) which should be able to do what you want: There are many other alternatives in other applications - but these are for Windows or OSX. I'll list them here for other users with same question but different host/OS needs: Pro Tools - Strip Silence Reaper - Dynamic Split Cubase - Cut head ...


4

There are different aspects in "the Mickey Mouse voice (effect)": One is the relatively high general pitch of the voice. Mickey has always been spoken by a man, but the speakers voice's pitch or frequency (called 'F0') has always been at the level of a higher woman's or a child's voice. So, there is generally two possible ways to achieve that: a) if ...


3

Lower or change formants with melodyne Pitch shift automation Extreme noisy Vocoder Load into a granulator and automate the parameters phrase by phrase so that the voice dissolves into granular bits at the end of a phrase or at some consonants. Unnatural Reverb. Hall reverb in small rooms, small reverb in big hall scenes. Layer that original with a distorted,...


3

A pop screen has more uses than just reducing pops and wind: it also protects the mic from moisture from someone's breath, and it can serve as a spacer ensuring a minimal distance from the mic is kept which you can set by adjusting the distance between the pop screen and the mic. This can be handy to control the amount of proximity effect.


3

I have to agree that it's the talent, and not the treatment of the recording, that creates the magic trailer VO. With few exceptions, most LaFontaine copycats fall short as they can't hit the lower register as well as he did, and no amount of doctoring can fake it accurately IMO. You can have successful VO with a totally different voice of course, as proven ...


3

DJ software like Native Instruments Traktor is pretty good at guessing the tempo by analysing a music track. It can also send out a MIDI clock signal that can be used to sync lights or something to. Ableton Live and some other programs can do Audio-To-Midi, with varying success: it works better on simple soundfiles and much worse on full musical songs with ...


3

The most relevant piece of software I could find is called Praat. It's free, and it offers spectral, pitch, and formant analysis—but it was developed for the study of phonetics. This is deep software though, and, though I feel comfortable in max, reaktor, and other visual programming environments, Praat is beyond me. It's the most relevant software i've ...


3

I second Mike Rinehart's suggestion of the Blue Yeti. Although I haven't used one personally, it is one of the most popular budget mics on the market. Its switchable pickup pattern means you can set it to capture sound from all directions equally. Interestingly, it actually has three condenser capsules, which allows it to be used in a wide range of ...


3

Processing always has the negative side effect of either increasing noise or taking away from the quality. The secret to processing is you want to do as little as possible to achieve what you want, and in this case that means removing steps that essentially do the same thing. As for the order here's what I would do. Normalize - This will amplify it to ...


3

Have you considered flex-pitch in a product like Logic X? I don't do music and therefore haven't used it a lot, but you can make some interesting effects with it. You record the phrase in your normal voice, then use pitch correction to change the note and octave to your liking. It seems like you have a decent ear for what makes the Mickey voice (high ...


3

I think that what you are looking for is something like SOX, through which you will be able to script a solution. The solution will be to simply apply an EQ curve to the recordings to emulate the scenario where you are playing back the file through the phone. It might just be that your current playback solution isn't quite cutting it so some EQ might help ...


2

Assuming the recording and levels are good in the first place. I will almost always roll off lows and shelf the highs, even if its just a little. Human voices don't really have much below 120hz or above 12khz so get rid of it. Next I work low to high on the frequency band. It usually looks something like this: A lot of voices often have a specific ...


2

Start with the right style of voice and performance, which are in the ballpark of what you're looking to achieve. Then edit and process it however possible until it sounds like something nice, without destroying it. Vocal processing is tricky and relies largely on the recorded performance/voice, unless ones making sci-fi vocals, which can take lots of ...


2

That sound has not much more than a high-pass filter set somewhere above 200Hz, going to a phaser or flanger with very fast modulation and pretty much feedback!


2

I experimented to get this kind of an effect on a job app, and my reference point were some of the voiceovers in DotA 2 -- I love how well some of them are tuned to sound like they're coming from within a suit of armor. Here's a great example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj-F3aI6m-g Closest I got to this effect, after some experimentation (including a ...


2

I will second Ryan in his assertion that post-processing is saved for later. Anything you can fix with an edit is better served with that edit than with noise reduction. It doesn't matter how good the algorithms and processors are, noise-reduction will affect the parts you want to keep as well. Experience helps you figure out when you're reaching that point ...


2

To create a robotic voice quickly, the trick is to duplicate your voice, and move the second voice of an image to the right. Listen to the result. Otherwise, the plug mentioned above are good. You can also use a vocoder.


2

My suggestion: focus on the performance. It's the one aspect of the sound that no piece of software can touch (or fix), so see if you can get 90% of the way there with your voice actor alone. These computerized voices all seem to have a layer of performance magic, whether it be a gentle clarity of the star trek computer voice or the sarcastic monotone of ...


2

There are tons of apps for this. From wikipedia: AthTek Free Voice Changer, Skype Voice Changer, AV Voice Changer Software Diamond 7.0, MorphVOX of Screaming Bee INC, Fake Voice Or maybe try Avox Mutator.


2

Sounds like a female voice, pitch-adjusted upwards for a synth-y quality, with a little fuzz for a buzzy static edge, a drop of phase shift for shimmer, and a short but noticeable time delay to introduce a second copy of the voice. The recording itself may be doubled instead of a delay; it's so short and heavily processed it's hard to tell.


2

Some basic rules when recording voice: Don't record with the microphone touching your lips. It's too close, the voice will sound bassy when using a directional microphone, and you will get pops and sibilants from when you sing 'p', 't' and 's', etc. Don't record with the microphone too far away. It will pick up too much of the room sound, and it will sound ...


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