4

"It depends" <- everyone's favorite answer On the films that have M&E deliverable requirements for foreign markets, basically everything's got to be covered by either cut FX or foley. It's often good practice to make sure everything is covered. That being said...depends on time. If the production is great for somebody struggling with a doorknob, ...


3

If you're 'just' editing, at a push you can use pretty much anything. If you're mixing, or any situation where you need to be aware of true EQ, levels or placement within a stereo field, then headphones can often be misleading. With speakers, your brain can figure out not just what, but where each sound is & the relative levels between them. On ...


2

Headroom, mainly. Your peak voltage is 1.736 volt only when you have a sine wave signal of exactly +4 dBu (0VU on professional equipment). That never happens in the real world.. 0 on the meters is an averaged level, so with real-world audio signals you will have peaks far higher than 0VU. A peak of +20 (+24 dBu) would result in 35Vpp output which would ...


2

I don't know that equipment, so this is not really an answer but... even though hitting the limiter would not allow it to go over-meter, it's not going to sound nice. You'll hear it suddenly flat-line. If you've no other safety-net, I'd suggest testing before-hand how much noise-floor you perceptively gain at -6 or -12 & see which you can live with. ...


2

Fletcher-Munson curves, or more generally equal-loudness contours, are mainly used when measuring sound pressure levels and noise. The definition of such curves roughly goes like this: An equal-loudness contour is a measure of sound pressure (dB SPL), over the frequency spectrum, for which a listener perceives a constant loudness when presented with ...


2

Firstly, there is no set formula for this. You have to... a) train your ears b) use your ears. The only standard I would adhere to is to pick a loudness level and make sure your final mix conforms to that. -24 LUFS will be a good place to start. Always make sure that your dialogue is able to punch through the music and effects. Dialogue is king. You can ...


1

Source a USB based microphone for the iphone. There are many available. What is the difference between a computer and a smartphone? Size and usability. Other than that, they are one and the same.


1

What you are looking for is a product called "Speakerphone" from "Audioease". This has some basic room reverbs and also device impulses. Additional - more expensive - options are "Altiverb" and "Indoor" - also by Audioease.


1

What you want is to create an audio file that, when played through a speaker that distorts, somehow compensates for that distortion. That's generally impossible, because the distortion is an unpredictable, chaotic 'signal' that's added to your audio. It depends on the exact volume of the audio, the loudspeaker, other sounds in the room, and (because you're ...


1

What you're hearing could be the result of a sampling-rate conversion issues, although I can't be sure without having heard an example recording. You're using an external audio-interface, which has it's own A/D-conversion hardware, running at a certain configured sampling-rate (44100Hz, 48000Hz, 96000Hz etc…) . When your mac's internal audio-hardware uses a ...


1

Izotope RX Advanced De-Clipper is really your only chance at saving this.


1

Check out the hexdump of the file you created. When you do, you will realise that there are 7FFF values in the file that correspond to your sample peaks. But, I'm going to say that you also have clipping here. Why? Because I can see two values of 7FFF directly next to each other. This indicates that there are two identical peak sample values adjacent to ...


1

Marcus Weaver-Hightower, PhD states in this video that "there's no magic transcriber out there" to remove human effort from the transcription process. That being said, his suggestion of using voice recognition software to speed up the transcription process may be something of value to you. You could consider using software like the Max Planck Institute's ...


1

My thoughts are that they might be used as a tool to help, for lack of a better word "hack" your way to a better mix, as that's ultimately the end goal. To clarify some things : There's no hack in mixing.There are techniques that get you there faster, but hack - no! Also you can't just notch 2 frequencies and expect the perceived loudness to be insane. ...


1

I don't know if you necessarily need RX - sounds like EQ is going to be a more effective tool. RX is used to remove noise and fix specific issues: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4dISychPQEt04pe2EFaPRHe_477PZWdW Mike Thornton's vids give you a good overview. They actually show you it step by step too. If your sound is all midrange then EQ to add ...


1

Every audio file is different so what works on 1 might not work on the other. What about it reminds you of a telephone? frequency spectrum, EQ, distortion? Depending on the issue you might need RX but other tools might help you out more. Its a very deep set of tools. How much have you tried? Have you read through the Izotope Noise reduction guide, some ...


1

Are the leaves causing problems with the dialogue or are you just wondering if you can mix production FX with sound FX? If the production sound is a problem you could attempt using Izotope RX. The Decrackler module may help. If you're just looking to add the sound FX,, I would use them subtly to enhance the production FX. Try and match the timbre of the ...


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