12

Well, the best way to do it is to find yourself a wild dragon that hasn't been exposed to humans too much and by tickling it behind its ears you will cause it to roar. You just have to make sure to stay clear of the tail and head though. And for the real answer: Most dragon roars or rather "animal" roars are a combination of different roars, breathing ...


6

Just FIND sounds. They come from EVERYWHERE. Some are recorded outside, some in staircases, some are found in patches on synthesizers or even generated in FL Studio-like programs. You should get intimate with time-based FX like reverb and flange, competent with EQ, and experiment with things like pitch-shift, reverse, and time stretch. Be creative and ...


5

The DAW is not that important (FL is ok to start). Since you are getting started and you will find difficult to design the sounds, you need a good set of VSTi plugins that emulate the video game consoles' soundchips. The good news is that there are loads of these plugins to make chiptunes (most of them free)... just take a look... Chipmusic Plugins 9 of the ...


4

It happens all the time. We also contact friends and peers who might have the sounds we need, and trade effects back and forth (which is a great way to expand your library). Everything in audio post is predicated on budget, time and need. We'd all love to record or synthesize brand new sounds for every element needed in a film, but that's just not a ...


3

To make chip music sounding 'nostalgic' you will also need to recreate the techniques used in the old days where sound channel is limited. Like you can have only 2 square waves channel. (that was NES's limitation, 2 Squares , 1 Triangle , 1 Noise and (delta modulation) sample channel) So, in order to form a chord you would use a very fast arpeggio to create ...


3

First off, I think it's cool they didn't just ask you to make it sound like Transformers! But I think it's a difficult task because the sound in the clip is very stylised and not actually in very tight sync to the action. It feels like you hear more swooping/flying around and atmos than actual synchronised movement sounds, so perhaps part of the challenge ...


3

From my point of view, there are often very good results when you use the best of the both worlds = simple audio manipulation + synthesis. In your case ("dark-feeling game" as you mentioned), it might be fun to work with a sound that is usually considered to be very close to actual ambient music. A combination of some dark electronic soundscapes and layered ...


2

The Jedi lightsabres are tuned in A and the Sith ones are tuned in G. The 2 semitone pitch difference is present to make the duels seem more sinister and tense. It works too, if you pitched them both the same there would be a noticable difference in dramatic effect.


2

I've just watched the longplay of Super Mario 3D Land, and have some advice for you. I work with casual games for about a year, and those sounds is from my type of work. The basic rule for this SFX's is "imagine, that everything is tiny". It's like living in a toy world. The sounds is more rounded and all envelopes is as glide as possible. In foley try to ...


2

There are probably as many approaches to this as there are people doing sound design, there's no hard and fast rules, and finding your way is part of the 'art' of it, the thing that makes it yours rather than someone else's recipe, or worse, a cliche. First thing to do is get comfortable in some audio editing or sequencing software package. It doesnt which ...


2

Use Ableton! Then go to its inbuild granular synthesis of audio files and warp it with rythmical/transient algorithm. Check the transient marker and move them if needed. Then set the mode to -->|. (Looks like two arrows in default). So every gunshot is now played once. Then you can pitch it without quanticing or loosing pitch. Other way is slice to Sampler ...


2

Here's a few great books on Sound Design/Effects, and they explain it for most mediums: http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Effects-Bible-Create-Hollywood-ebook/dp/B003FQM2S4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419161790&sr=1-1&keywords=sound+effects+in+books http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Design-Expressive-Effects-Cinema-ebook/dp/B003FQM2XY/ref=sr_1_3?s=...


2

If you're looking to learn about foley this is the book... http://www.amazon.ca/The-Foley-Grail-Performing-Animation/dp/0240811259


2

Are you looking for a degree in this field? Or just online resources to learn yourself? Here is a course you can look into: https://www.digipen.edu/academics/degree-programs/bamsd/ I am part of the audio programming degree here. Its absolutely amazing and if you are into music and video games this is where you would want to go.


2

I'd try several DAWs before settling down, most have free trials. Once you've committed to a platform and started investing in specific resources for it, inertia makes it difficult for you to switch, so take your time. I'm an Ableton fan, in part because creating your own macro/automated setups for effects chains is incredibly addictive and easy... and also ...


2

it sounds like some sort of pad, are you sure that's brass? definitely a wet sound. try to find a pad in your DAW that sounds somewhat similar. Add a flanger effect and toy around with the decay. Shorten the release up too. I think you'll be able to recreate it that way. The humming sound is a guy going "o0o0o0o-o0o0-o0o" but with a vocoder effect on it. I ...


2

I will give you some feedback! I like long and constructive feedback so I will give that to you. One of the things I really liked was that bottle smash, really good job on that sound effect. I also like the underlying music tones at the beginning and the end of the trailer. Things I didn't care for is how everything sounded very close and could easily tell ...


2

I would start off by learning wwise. Audiokinetic has a lot of tutorials and sample projects available. Beyond that, I would download Unity or UE4 and start following tutorials on implementation. Knowing how game audio works and is implemented will help you begin to sound design for the game and the players experience. Further, when you are playing games, ...


1

If you're looking for opinions, It sounds like the source sound is made up of; A rocky surface(gritty, ha) being hit with a heavy object, with rocks being dislodged, crumbling and falling. There's also a wooden stick kind of whacking sound. Maybe the crumbling rocks are hitting wooden floor. Sounds more like they're hitting logs or Bamboo though. As for ...


1

Try studying the gear specs. Those consoles of old, they were running dedicated chipsets - on-board synthesisers tasked only with sound creation. Hardware back then was very limited, unable to employ multiple tasks by one chip due to lack of memory and proccessing power. There were quite a few famous designs - SID on C64, Pokey on Atari XE/XL, even some kind ...


1

Good start for retroish synth sfx is basic square wave with invidual ADSR for both pitch and volume. Experiment with different kind of parameters and think of the direction where sound is going. Add some effects and filtering if you need to make it sound more modern than 8-bit computers and consoles. As for the SFX heard in the clip. First one sounds like ...


1

I've known about a cool playlist of sound design "mini-tutorials" on YouTube specifically for Zebra2. It covers things like: Usage of ADSR Envelopes Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) Frequency Modulation (FM) Filter Cutoff/Resonance and more! If you would like to flesh out your sound design skills, it might be a good idea to watch them and see if you can ...


1

I really recommend finding sounds that you like and recreating them. As stated before, nothing beats experimentation. However, focused experimentation is really important. This is how I first learned - I was designing synth samples for a DAW and had to recreate sounds used in a number of songs. Not only did I get a better grip on synthesis/design but I also ...


1

Nothing beats experimentation! Grab a demo of Fruity Loops (FL Studio) and play with the synthesizer plugins. You'll be making cool sounds in no time. Fruity Loops makes it very easy for someone who doesn't know a great deal about music or audio to create sounds, tracks, and mixes. Don't expect professional sounding results right away, but usually if ...


1

Ya.....I think FL studio would be the right tool for you to start.


1

Watch Asian horror films. They are well-practiced at generating suspense with music and sound effects. Mostly it's minor key and discordant stuff. The sound designers who work on thrillers/suspense films use the same techniques such as filters, reverb, and pitch/time shifting that mentioned above to achieve a certain atmosphere. The kinds of sounds people ...


1

You should, beside recording and finding atmospheres, learn to use synthesisers. Espacially randomised noise filter and pitch stuff, combined with reverb delay and others, will create really futuristic soundscapes.


1

There's two large parts to this. Creating the actual sounds and implementing them in game. How you do each will effect the other. On the very high level, you can use what ever DAW you're comfortable with to create sounds. The setting of the game will drive what sort of sounds you'll want to be creating. On the implementing side, are you using middleware? ...


1

I would suggest adding some square or sawtooth waveform synthesizers to what you already have. From your description it seems like you were somewhat satisfied with your mech sounds before your feedback but ended up agreeing with it. To me this says that the sounds you created are sufficiently 'Giant Mech Robot'-like but that they are not properly stylized ...


1

Definitely do not play a background song under your foley work. Have faith that potential employers will judge and understand your work for what it is. If you did the foley, then play the foley in all its glory.


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