9

As far as the kinds of "audio gymnastics" your client is talking about, they are definitely possible. They are something I do regularly. There's no easy way to learn it though, and few "rules" that will apply in all situations. [Previous mentions of cutting in the middle of words and on plosives or other hard consonants are useful examples. Cutting after the ...


6

There are two main elements to this answer- 1) Room- This is VERY important. I recorded an actor screaming (should've brought my earplugs!) in a wardrobe room. The room was small but not too small and the hanging clothes worked pretty well for difusion. We checked out a few different rooms and found this one to be the best. Not too dead and not too ...


6

I tend to go manual. When I'm editing VO, its just a matter of a fast breath cutting pass and then a separate pass of other editorial and mixing. For breath cutting, I'll make the waveform and the track very big so that I'm just looking at the softer stuff in the track (not worried about seeing peaks when breath editing) then i'll place my left hand on the ...


5

+1 on Mike's suggestion regarding lavs. If you're using stand mounted mics though, try placing the mic capsule above the mouth (cheek bone height) and slightly to the side. Obviously, still aimed at the mouth. The point is to get it out from in front of it. A quick fix for you in post... Create a duplicate track of the DX with your de-esser on it. Set it ...


4

You should be able to work some magic with those tools with a bit of patience. Apart from getting your hands on a CEDAR or ADR-ing it, you might get something half decent to work with. Heres what I did in 3 mins using RX: http://soundcloud.com/andrewjohnlewis/noisy-dialogue-2 Very rough, but with some finesse you could get somewhere there I'm sure.


4

Other than turning down the music, if you have access to the music stems, you can "remix" the music to accomodate the dialogue. Certain instruments often compete with dialogue (cymbals, guitars, or strings are common culprits). If you are working with premixed music or licensed tracks from an album it is obvious that the music was not mixed with the ...


4

This is a documentary. You can get away with noise in the production audio, and people will accept it. They key point is whether or not the audio is intelligible. Listening to that example you linked to, I would suggest you leave it alone. The noise floor, while present, is not interfering with my ability to pick out the phonemes. Give it some EQ to ...


4

In general, listen to whether it sounds good or whether it has something that irritates you. Or whether the sound is fitting or whether it's e.g. weak (in the modern days of dynamics squashing that can be a valid notion that you may want to adjust with compression. Just remember what the dialogue is for, i.e. it has to sound humanly like the person who's ...


4

It sounds like a project where no one thought about the end result (sound wise). I wouldn't touch a thing and 'step away from the vehicle'. Next time, take care to record externally. Greetings, Captain Hindsight


4

you need to hand the director an estimate on how much it will cost to ADR the whole film. also hand him an estimate on how much it would have cost to rent a couple lavs and an H4N.


4

It depends on the agreements made between the dialogue editor/supervisor and the sound supervisor. Mixers could prefer to not have volume automation, but this differs. Why do you ask? Are you editing dialogue? Or are you mixing the movie? Recommended reading: Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures


4

I usually have my Dial editors only do very basic level adjustments. Basically lower any really loud pfx or a line that is dramatically out of sorts with the rest of the scene. With noise reduction, I never want my editor to do any broadband NR or notch filtering. You can get into a lot of unnecessary processing that might not be needed once everything ...


4

Your simplest option may just be to find the same words spoken by the same individual in an earlier part of the interview and splice them in. It will sound much closer to the correct speech than an artificially generated sample. This issue is the main reason why you don't cut until well after the end of the interview or scene.


3

Exactly what Gary said - you don't need to ADR, what international M&Es are looking for are the effects and music, which includes foley. They do not need or use the dialogue track (someone please correct me if I'm mistaken). So yes, you will have to record fand/orcut in foley effects for PFX that are embedded into the dialogue tracks. The international ...


3

I'd ignore being authentic to the recording. If you wanted authenticity in the doc you wouldn't edit it at all. You're trying to convey the speakers words/ideas in the clearest manner possible. If that means you have to steal an "I was at the sh" from the cutting room floor, so be it. Regarding your deadline, get through the edit first. Work in quick, ...


3

Another trick is to look for similar beginnings/endings of words elsewhere in the piece. If you can steal the top of "was" from some other time the subject says it, that might help fix the I-eh-was issue more than trying to get a virtual razor in where the "eh" slides into the "w" badly. You can also disguise edits by cutting in the middle of a word rather ...


3

Just like everyone else I first start by going through and smoothing all the transitions out, picking mics, and inverting phase on problem mics. Sometimes while editing I'll even run some RX to see if I can get room tones to work. This all depends on what type of film it is. A horror film with lots of sound design allows you to get away with more than say a ...


3

Me too. I'm sorry to tell you that this is probably lost. And also I think it's a waist of time (sorry again). There is no tool or way to make something good from bad. If you start filtering, repairing spectrum, you don't make it good, you only make it a little less bad. It needs do be proper recorded or replaced. Recording in cars: If the engine is on and ...


3

Well, isn't this a case of mainly matching the convention? If it's established, then it's effective, even if it has no rational reason. When you think of it, another way to convey past would be some sounds or music that are recognized as belonging to a certain time period (that's in the past. It can be even the film's past, i.e. the reference is made to an ...


3

I took a look through Ableton and it is possible, though potentially more time-consuming depending upon how you have your session set up. If your edits are clean and each "ooh", "aah", etc. is its own separate region, bring all of the regions into the "session" view as clips. Make sure they are edited with proper start/end times using the start/stop ...


3

A show usually has a leader reference tone and also has pops, known as sync pops or head pops (versus tail pops) or casually just called "2 pop". The reference tone is in regard to calibration level, the 2 pop is (secondarily for calibration) but primarily for ensuring sync - especially when we';re talking about ProTools sessions containing the ...


3

As everyone else has said, noise reduction is the way to go, pretty aggressive noise reduction is all that will help I think. Thing is, if you want this conversation for sound bites or anything, it's probably going to be unusable. You may be able to pull enough of the noise out so that the vocals become just audible, but they're likely to sound watery and ...


2

My company tracks a good amount of audio books and headphones are standard for this type of session. You will catch little things that need to be picked up in the cans that you might not in the monitors. This type of workflow was actually pressed on me from the producers that produce high profile audio books daily. Whatever you are working on, if your end ...


2

I realize this is an old thread, but iZotope RX3 does a great job of this if the music is in stereo. What you can do is use the Center Channel Extractor in RX3, and it will use phase cancellation to isolate the mono dialogue from the stereo music. I work in a trailer house where we frequently need to clean up bites from movies with bad stems.


2

As far as I'm aware, if the words are slurred into each other, it's very difficult to split naturally. You could find another similar ending and splice it to finish your word, but it could feel very unnatural. Surely excessive editing will lose the authenticity of the doc?


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