9

As far as the kinds of "audio gymnastics" your client is talking about, they are definitely possible. They are something I do regularly. There's no easy way to learn it though, and few "rules" that will apply in all situations. [Previous mentions of cutting in the middle of words and on plosives or other hard consonants are useful examples. Cutting after the ...


7

Very kind of you Brendan to link to the blog post, glad people are finding it useful! As Melissa has touched upon (and that book is a very good introduction to dialogue that I equally recommend), and as briefly mentioned in the blog post, editorial is the foundation here. No amount of Broadband noise suppression, even a Cedar DNS, can fix a dialogue track ...


6

My personal take on it is that usually for stems the channel denomination should equal your other stems, or at least be LCR or 5.0. In the case of working in a stereo environment, I'd recommend going with stereo. For one, dialogue does have to be panned sometimes - whether for creative purposes, or in rare cases to fix a story issue that's hard to see ...


6

There are two main elements to this answer- 1) Room- This is VERY important. I recorded an actor screaming (should've brought my earplugs!) in a wardrobe room. The room was small but not too small and the hanging clothes worked pretty well for difusion. We checked out a few different rooms and found this one to be the best. Not too dead and not too ...


6

I tend to go manual. When I'm editing VO, its just a matter of a fast breath cutting pass and then a separate pass of other editorial and mixing. For breath cutting, I'll make the waveform and the track very big so that I'm just looking at the softer stuff in the track (not worried about seeing peaks when breath editing) then i'll place my left hand on the ...


5

I, too, have used TL Space as my go-to reverb for almost 6 years now (that is, unless I have the privilege of using an M6000 - those things are sweet). I absolutely put on verb if the character is outside. A lot of people I've worked with don't realize that one of the largest surface areas that creates reflection is the ground or floor in a room. In this ...


5

I'd say insanely difficult, if not impossible. You're going to have huge issues if the music is audible while the person is speaking. If that's the case, you're going to need something that can separate out elements of a complex signal. The only thing I can think of that might be able to pull that off is Melodyne...but I'm not sure even that will work. Is ...


5

+1 on Mike's suggestion regarding lavs. If you're using stand mounted mics though, try placing the mic capsule above the mouth (cheek bone height) and slightly to the side. Obviously, still aimed at the mouth. The point is to get it out from in front of it. A quick fix for you in post... Create a duplicate track of the DX with your de-esser on it. Set it ...


4

My forté is not in dialog editing but I can shed some light based on working with and learning from some really talented people: Do you like 4 frames or 2 frames fade outs and ins on scenes? How long do you like your fades from character to character in a scene? Depends on the scene but I'd use 2 frames as the standard. That's how I prepare FX, BG and ...


4

While I agree with @Stavrosound, if you're talking tv it depends on what your deliverables sheet dictates. Different networks, even different departments in the same network, request different formats of stems as final deliverables. If you're using a single master template for all your work, I'd bus my dialog in stereo (or lcr) for panning, verb, delay, ...


4

You should be able to work some magic with those tools with a bit of patience. Apart from getting your hands on a CEDAR or ADR-ing it, you might get something half decent to work with. Heres what I did in 3 mins using RX: http://soundcloud.com/andrewjohnlewis/noisy-dialogue-2 Very rough, but with some finesse you could get somewhere there I'm sure.


4

Other than turning down the music, if you have access to the music stems, you can "remix" the music to accomodate the dialogue. Certain instruments often compete with dialogue (cymbals, guitars, or strings are common culprits). If you are working with premixed music or licensed tracks from an album it is obvious that the music was not mixed with the ...


4

This is a documentary. You can get away with noise in the production audio, and people will accept it. They key point is whether or not the audio is intelligible. Listening to that example you linked to, I would suggest you leave it alone. The noise floor, while present, is not interfering with my ability to pick out the phonemes. Give it some EQ to ...


4

In general, listen to whether it sounds good or whether it has something that irritates you. Or whether the sound is fitting or whether it's e.g. weak (in the modern days of dynamics squashing that can be a valid notion that you may want to adjust with compression. Just remember what the dialogue is for, i.e. it has to sound humanly like the person who's ...


4

It sounds like a project where no one thought about the end result (sound wise). I wouldn't touch a thing and 'step away from the vehicle'. Next time, take care to record externally. Greetings, Captain Hindsight


4

you need to hand the director an estimate on how much it will cost to ADR the whole film. also hand him an estimate on how much it would have cost to rent a couple lavs and an H4N.


4

It depends on the agreements made between the dialogue editor/supervisor and the sound supervisor. Mixers could prefer to not have volume automation, but this differs. Why do you ask? Are you editing dialogue? Or are you mixing the movie? Recommended reading: Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures


4

I usually have my Dial editors only do very basic level adjustments. Basically lower any really loud pfx or a line that is dramatically out of sorts with the rest of the scene. With noise reduction, I never want my editor to do any broadband NR or notch filtering. You can get into a lot of unnecessary processing that might not be needed once everything ...


4

Your simplest option may just be to find the same words spoken by the same individual in an earlier part of the interview and splice them in. It will sound much closer to the correct speech than an artificially generated sample. This issue is the main reason why you don't cut until well after the end of the interview or scene.


3

Since I started out as an ADR mixer and dialogue editor and did this for quite a while, I have a few guidelines I make sure are known if I have someone cutting for me, and these are: Never consolidate an edit. I like all edits to be on the track and easily fixable if there is something I hear that is not quite right (I have an ear for the slightest over-...


3

You might have a speed problem. Is this PAL or NTSC? If it's too fast try resampling at 46034 Hz. If too slow, resample at 50000 Hz. Sync with plosives like P or B, also M's will work. You should not have to re-sync each word.


3

Is there guide audio? The animators "should" have had scratch dialogue in order for them to draw the lip movement. I'm not totally sure of your workflow, but sync has to be achieved when you're recording your actors. You can cut and paste and squeeze and stretch dialogue all you want, but if you process it too much, it'll just sound wrong. If there is a ...


3

Your reference here is the Two Towers (LOTR) special features where they discuss how they created the doubling effect between Sauramon and Gandalf when Gandalf reappears as Gandalf the White. This should give you some inspiration. Also, if the wizard is supposed to have the dominant voice, I would re-record the other characters lines whispered so the wizard'...


3

I 100% agree with Tim. Let the stage make the decision. The ONLY EQ I ever (rarely) use in the edit is a 12-18dB/oct high pass rolloff at 80Hz on the Master if the production mixer left me with some nasty low end, but that's only if the low end is so bad that you can actually see the modulations and its making every single minute sub-frame edit snap ...


3

Just like everyone else I first start by going through and smoothing all the transitions out, picking mics, and inverting phase on problem mics. Sometimes while editing I'll even run some RX to see if I can get room tones to work. This all depends on what type of film it is. A horror film with lots of sound design allows you to get away with more than say a ...


3

Another trick is to look for similar beginnings/endings of words elsewhere in the piece. If you can steal the top of "was" from some other time the subject says it, that might help fix the I-eh-was issue more than trying to get a virtual razor in where the "eh" slides into the "w" badly. You can also disguise edits by cutting in the middle of a word rather ...


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