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5

Garageband has to do a fair bit of processing in order to display the waveform. In order to minimise wasted time for the performers, it allows you to hear this waveform straight away, while doing the waveform processing in the background. So really, you are seeing symptoms of the app developers trying to be helpful by letting you hear the music before it is ...


5

For a live-sound design production of "King Lear" we constructed a rain machine that consisted of a long, narrow (5 foot by 7 inch) wooden box on a teeter-totter fulcrum. The box had dozens of nails sticking out of the bottom and we filled it with dried beans. As you rocked the seesaw back and forth you could get more or less continual rainfall and also ...


3

If I would approach it, I would go and try the following: First of all, FM radio broadcasting has an upper limit of 15 KHz, and lower limit of 30 Hz. So cut all frequencies outside that scope to start with a very steep filter. Then a "little desktop / clock radio" would use a very small speaker which would not reproduce any sound lower than 200 Hz, so roll ...


3

It is certainly possible to broadcast over any distance of your choosing, it's just a matter of what equipment you need and what licenses you will require. When conditions are right, it's even possible to bounce a signal around the world at the proper frequencies. For FM, you will need a transmitter with sufficient power, the necessary local clearances to ...


3

Save your money. Put them on CD, play them on your car stereo, re-record it with that decent mic. Unless you really need Speakerphone or Futzbox.


2

Trying out the plugin Speakerphone would be the obvious answer....


2

I think the most elegant way would be to take an impulse response of a car stereo and run it through that. That way you will not only capture the characteristics of the speakers, but also the space of the car. Worth reading this: http://designingsound.org/2012/12/recording-impulse-responses/ There is also a plugin called speakerphone which models various ...


2

There isn't a single, simple answer for this question. This forum post explains: You can estimate the approximate Audio information [1] content of FM by using the bandwidth and dynamic range. FM pretty much tops out at about 15K and the dynamic range is about 70db. Each bit represents approx 6db so we need just under 12 bits and a sampling rate of 30K. ...


2

I have never personally worked on a project for radio broadcast but I'm sure the standard output file would be a stereo interleaved wav file. However, you should pay particular attention to the level norms, which can vary somewhat from country to country. Your bounce would need to conform with the level norms (peaks and average levels) so I would make sure ...


2

The license given to a radio station (whether analogue, digital, or online) grants the station the right to play music to the public. The license is granted by the relevant collection society (eg, PRS in the UK) and the fee is proportional to the max amount of possible listeners at any given time (for big station this is often quoted as 'reach', for online ...


2

I'm in full agreement with audionuma's answer, but just to add that a 3 grand mic preamp will not fix a 10 buck microphone. As you didn't mention in your question what mic & preamps you currently have, this is a bit of guesswork, but assuming it's a fairly basic setup, you can gain a reasonable amount of sound quality by using a USB pre-amp - they ...


2

Actually, the mic pre amp you are mentioning is a pre amp plus a processing chain (a dynamics processor and some filters and eqs). You cannot emulate the pre amp itself in software as amplifying the mic signal is inherently done in the analog domain. The cost of a mic pre amp is related to the analog components included, their selection and association to ...


1

What you are proposing cannot be done. Your only option is to use something like the 'dialogue isolate' feature of Izotope RX to isolate the dialogue in each of the files, then compare one result with the other to pick the best outcome. It is not possible to 'extract a pure version' of the dialogue because although the dialogue is 'similar', there is no ...


1

My approach (fast version) would be to use an amp-simulation-VST like Voxengo Boogex (which is a great free plugin) & to use the internal EQ settings (cutting the frequencies outside that well described scope above :) ). https://www.voxengo.com/product/boogex/ I also like it to turn up the "pre-gain" settings while keeping the post-gain down (...


1

Although designed for music jams over internet, Jamulus is a handy solution for your purpose. It runs on Windows, MacOSX and Linux. From the website: The Jamulus software enables musicians to perform real-time jam sessions over the internet. There is one server running the Jamulus server software which collects the audio data from each Jamulus client, mixes ...


1

I wouldn't recommend either. The Behringer only sends 2 channels to the computer, and the Quattro doesn't have drivers for anything past Windows XP (with no mention of 64 bit). From my past experience with trying to do things "on the cheap" I've found that you need to very careful what you buy. Make sure you are not going to have to buy another one in six ...


1

heavy use of a high and low pass filters on an EQ should help do the job. Then adding the infamous smiley face EQ curve by removing the mid range a little. I personally like using an impulse response of a terrible speaker... Like poundshop/dollar store? toy speakers. I generally keep my speaker IR's clean so then for the car I would add a tiny bit of dull ...


1

Get a set of NS-10's... But more to the point (to elaborate on the post above), One of the more deceiving issues in a recording studio is that they tend to have some of the best speakers in the world installed in some of the best listening spaces ever made. This is all great until you consider the fact that (especially today with the iPod etc) most music ...


1

Performance will get you a long ways towards your goal. They need to project, make sure their headphone feeds aren't too loud. Are they supposed to be getting interviewed? If not keep the mic farther away in more of a boom position. Make sure you don't have any room reflections. Some of it depends on how far you want to go - believable vs "radio" and ...


1

Most radio spots are done at 48K sampling rate, audio post in general really. Here in the US there aren't any broadcast level specs, most people just set their output limiters at -1 or 2. From there you just mix with your monitors at the correct level and make a nice sounding mix. The stations themselves handle the final compression before the signal is ...


1

"Basically seperating Formant from base, and the ability to set a Freq range on the base will do that simple effect." There you have it. Now find the relevant parameters and settings. To put it straight, what it says is that you use a pitch-shifting plug-in that can perform pitch-shifting separately to the entire sound and just its formant parts: ...


1

This is very doable. Here are some options: Wired Lavaliere (less expensive, movement restrictive but they are in a box anyway) Wireless Lavaliere (more expensive, more maintenance required, lots of freedom of movement) Mount them in their hair above the mask, or near the edge of the mask by the mouth. Omnis will give you a more natural sound, but a ...


1

worked with puppeteers including the amazing Kevin clash and they use headbands with a wired lapel mic attached pointing towards the mouth. This is also the technique used for the actors in Where the Wild things are. Rather than ADR it straight to mic they acted it all out. Could be worth a try and that way you can use quite a directional microphone without ...


1

link it up and I'll give it a listen


1

A link to your work could raise some interest ;)


1

Clear Channel is most likely responsible for the fact that most radio promos sound the same. They own at least 1,200 radio stations in the US.


1

If we're thinking of the same thing it started pretty much the same second the synths, vocoders, and other tools got invented. In an entirely sonic media such as radio they where dependent of clear and recognizable jingles to have even the most inattentive listener, like drivers for example, to be aware of changes in programs and notifications without ...


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