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5

In my opinion the only voices that can be made cartooney in post is chipmunks, smurfs, and shrunken people voices, absolutely everything else (that I can think of right now) is a matter of great and talented voice-actors. It doesn't matter if it's Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck, Weebl, Bart Simpsons, Stimpy, Schwartzenegger, or perhaps Itchy and Scratchy, it's all ...


4

Helium during the actual voiceover recording. The voiceover talent is pretty much everything, since the delivery speed and cadence can create cartoonish qualities, and that kind of inflection can't be easily "mapped" by DSP. It's a human nuance. Or if you do play with pitch, try altering the formant as well (I know Waves UltrPitch allows for this, I'm ...


3

A classic Sound Ideas 4000 series should help you. http://www.sound-ideas.com/4000.html


3

Ask for a gameplay video showing different scenarios in game and start working on sounds on top of that video. I've found it's much easier in most cases than trying to describe things just with words. Later you can use this video to show the client how you would have implemented the sounds in game. If possible getting an unfinished version of the game could ...


3

The human mouth is capable of more than what people like to think. I suggest vocalizing what you're trying to do through a mic and see if that can be manipulated further with plug-ins to taste, and see if that works out. Otherwise, reversing certain sound effects (like a balloon pop, for example), something very transient, might do the trick for you of ...


3

Start off with slowly run a (damp) finger along a deflated balloon. Then record unrolling a large roll of parcel tape. Fiddle with the pitch of each sound, EQ them, put them together, and you should have something good, or at least good for a basis.


3

If you want classic, but slightly recognizable cartoon effects: http://www.sound-ideas.com/hb.html


2

This, too: Warner Brothers. http://www.sound-ideas.com/wb.html


2

Hi, this is another sfx library that is good: http://www.sound-ideas.com/rocky.html


2

It is partly due to the voice being mixed differently, but also comes from how the voice is recorded - controlled conditions in the studio, using a large diaphragm condenser with the actor close-in. Recording like this gives more bass and nice crisp highs in the tone of the voice. If you compare that to the way dialog on set is recorded - with a boom, from a ...


1

The audience also has an opinion nowadays and the typical slapstick sounds stick out because of over usage. It depends on the scene/setting ofcourse. I've never used those type of sounds and always try to create something new for cartoonish SFX. It works just as well (or better) and keeps things interesting for me, the client and the audience.


1

I always say, when in doubt supply options. I'm not sure if that will completely help your problem. But just offer lots of options when it comes to sound design elements.


1

Ask them for a few (like 3) references for games they are playing that are roughly similar to the game they are making. Go play those games and make video captures. Copy some of the key sounds you think would work from the reference games. Use these copies as a starting point for your new original work. Keep in mind that everyone needs to hear the sounds in ...


1

The best advice I can give is to ask questions. As a sound designer, you are the subject matter expert when it comes to designing a sound, not the client. The client may very well not know what they want. Ask about what the purpose of the sound is. Provide feedback and ideas on how that need can be met. Listen to their responses and flush out what it is ...


1

Do yourself a big favor and Google Treg Brown and Jimmy MacDonald. It's worth the time :)


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