7

Very kind of you Brendan to link to the blog post, glad people are finding it useful! As Melissa has touched upon (and that book is a very good introduction to dialogue that I equally recommend), and as briefly mentioned in the blog post, editorial is the foundation here. No amount of Broadband noise suppression, even a Cedar DNS, can fix a dialogue track ...


5

Templates, templates, templates Know your hot keys front and back To do the above, practice, practice, practice so it becomes muscle memory As George said, organize your workflow into jobs, passes, or procedures - scattered workflow is the quickest way to get gummed up - in it's most simply form, do all editorial together as one, and do all mixing/processing ...


4

I've toyed around with the demo quite a bit, and it's on my "to purchase" list. There are just a couple of higher priority items ahead of it at the moment. It's an impressive piece of software. Like RX2, I always describe it as a "reduction" tool, not a "removal tool. While it's got a bit of learning curve before you start getting the best results, those ...


3

Firstly, do any and all processing in WAV files. If your source material is on CD, then rip to 44.1kHz/16bit WAV and process at 24-bit in your software. Do not transcode via mp3. Tracks like 104b should be discarded. There is nothing you can do with files like this. The studio has not done their job properly. They have recorded the transfer with input ...


2

John Purcell, on his book Dialoge Editing, advises strongly to have a proper edit regarding the room tone before you run to the noise reduction. Having longer fades on room tones to trick our ears between aggressive transitions; If using plug ins like x_noise or alike, and turn to destructive, maybe try some eq first, know the noise offending your audio so ...


2

Stavrosound linked to a great post he did on the Waves C4 being used for cleaning dialogue. Here


2

I did a test drive with this plugin, and I honestly didn't like it at all. Call me old fashioned, or say that I may enjoy a pleasant bit of organic noisefloor in my dialogue tracks, but I wasn't turned onto this tool. I was turned onto the concept, but in implementation I didn't like it. The interface although cool looking, I didn't find very intuitive. ...


2

Buffer underrun might have caused that distortion to the audio. Buffer values can be increased in the audio driver section of the software or DAW you're using so that the issue disappears when exporting. There's no easy fix to samples exported with digital artifacts but you can treat them as intermittent noises or clicks and use restoration software like ...


2

Yes, you can definitely fix the majority of the pop on that one by effectively removing the DC offset that is in there. Most DAWs will let you do this - it can be a bit fiddly, but the aim is to zoom in as much as you can to see where the DC offset starts, and remove it. From your graph it looks like it was suddenly applied to both channels and then ramped ...


2

Amplification of the digital signal won't make any difference to the de-noising process other than introduce the possibility of signal clipping, which will further degrade the signal. Recommend you don't do this. Just work with the original signal. Feel free to increase the monitoring level, but not the signal processing level. dB is not a absolute ...


1

The list of activities you describe is pretty much the right way to approach this, although data corruption is not an easy artifact to correct. I would recommend removing any DC component as the first step, then proceeding to declip so that declip can operate symmetrically across the signal. As long as you are gentle with the denoise you are probably going ...


1

What you want is to create an audio file that, when played through a speaker that distorts, somehow compensates for that distortion. That's generally impossible, because the distortion is an unpredictable, chaotic 'signal' that's added to your audio. It depends on the exact volume of the audio, the loudspeaker, other sounds in the room, and (because you're ...


1

You need to post an example. This could be due to low quality variable bitrate - and those "bits" are just gone. Trying to boost the missing areas will just bring forth bad artifacts. If this is an old recording or something hard limited (by RMS), you may get lucky using a sidechained multiband updward expander: using the low frequencies as sidechain key ...


1

To solve problems with existing audio, best thing you can do is download Reaper. It is "free" to use (after 60 days it will start asking you if you want to buy, you can click continue). There's a plugin called "ReaFir" which has a subtractive mode where you let it loop over a selection of the audio that has the noise so it can profile it and then it pulls ...


1

Start with the highest resolution format that you have the recording in (mp3 is not ideal) - in reducing noise you are degrading the sound so you constantly have to question whether what you're doing is more damaging than what you have. ie. is the fan sound more annoying than noise reduction artefacts. So anyway I had a go at reducing the noise: Have a ...


1

Honestly, no not really. You're best bet is layering multiple samples together. If you only have, and can only get the one sample, you might try creating your own multiple versions with extremely slight offsets few milliseconds and a harmonizer or similar to +- a few cents on each track not the original. I don't know how well that will really work but it's ...


1

Pressed records, although stronger than a cut lacquer, are still susceptible to damage, especially the grooves. So you're very well likely out of luck. If you can hear the damage, then you do have surface the damage, because you will hear whatever the needle is tracking, both good and bad. I believe there are cleaning solutions which can be used with ...


1

There are a few things you can try but it's impossible to say without actually having the sound file in front of me. All of these suggestions will make you recordings sound messy and unprofessional but might help separate the voice from the reverb. There are usually expander presets in dynamic processor FX. The dynamic processor might also be called a ...


1

The demo clips look really impressive, but I'm a bit skeptical as to what it can actually accomplish until I have some hands-on experience with it. But yeah, looks impressive.


1

Like shaun said, unveil is quite impressive and specially for its price. When I tested it and were looking for alternatives I found also some Japanese stuff that made use of hardware tools (of course I couldn't test it). From the description looked like almost scifi. But again I couldn't obviously try it, it costed thousands of dollars and I don't remember ...


1

I wonder how this compares to SPL's DeVerb tool. I admit I'm lazy and I don't want to test the demo, so maybe someone has used both and can enlighten me.


1

You could do this a lot easier if you split it into two jobs. First you should edit the voice recordings in a linear editing software, and when this is done you can add the music and sound effects by using a multichannel DAW. For linear editing nothing beats Adobe Audition, with built in effects from iZotope. You can also use VST plugins with this. I use ...


1

Consider moving your post workflow to a different DAW. I worked with FL Studio from versions 4 through 7, and when it came down to doing solid audio cutting/editing I could never find a good method because the interface targeted MIDI and sample management. I don't know what new features they've added since 7 though. Have you heard of Reaper? It's free, and ...


1

Is the shot with low-level dialogue the only unusually low recording? Are there alternate takes at a more acceptable level? Using either one of those, or audio from another shot entirely like Michael Gilbert said, you can likely edit together a line that sounds convincingly enough like the original's tone and performance. Make sure that you've edited your ...


1

Obviously for the benefit of others with the same problem, since this was 18 months ago... (Hope you managed to make a difference, by the way!) The Cedar is really amazing and might help. If it's at all a harsh-sounding distortion and you're there with a Cedar anyways, you might try de-crackling and see what happens. Using an expander might do something ...


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