9

Record one long shot. Split it from the half. Put one half to the right channel and the other to left channel. Export a stereo file. This way you will get a very wide stereo image that is hard to get from a stereo field recording and your sounds in the front will be clearly distinct from ambience. Do not just transform to stereo. If you do that, you will ...


7

Nope, the sound information is missing and there is no way to recover it. (At least not that I'm aware of.) Even if there was, it would have to basically be completely guessing at what should be there. (Edit: there is software that will make the guess, and that's what the answer with the waveforms is illustrating. It is worth noting that it is a guess ...


7

It really depends. Sometimes you need a global volume boost because the audio is too low anyway to correctly listen to the noise reduction you're applying. Sometimes there's a 50 or 60Hz rumble or any other fixed unwanted frequency that you could remove before denoising... But generally speaking "the sooner the better". And before any processing other than ...


6

The basics are thus: "What are the specifications of the broadcaster you're delivering to?" You're asking us to distill a very complex process down into a "paint by numbers" process. If it were that easy, there'd be a manual that anyone could follow. I'm not trying to be mean by saying this, only trying to give you an idea of the scope of the question you'...


6

To quote Thomas Edison "I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work." It's always a horrible feeling when you look back at something at realize it wasn't as good as you'd hoped. Look at this as an opportunity to discover some things about yourself. Maybe you don't want to work under those sort of conditions in future projects, so that will ...


6

Your real problem is most likely recording technique and possibly the gear you're using. A good sound recorded properly doesn't need any EQ to sound professional. Where you place your microphone is the most important thing in capturing a sound and works just like EQing when in the right hands.


5

Yeah, forests are tough. Altiverb has some good forest verbs. Try an in game worldized reverb with heavy damping, a short tail and a longer predelay. I've found predelay to be the most important setting for real world verbs like this. It should almost sound like a long slapback verb. Try more than 80ms and experiment.


5

This is called a sibilance, or sibilant articulation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sibilant You can avoid it in the recording process using a pop filter, but in post production there are a handful of de-essers available for taming those sounds. The process involves compressing just the frequency range that contains the sibilant consonants through ...


4

typically you get a movie file and an OMF or AAF (which will contain all of the audio tracks and files) exported from the sequence in the Final Cut project.


4

Max/MSP's Convolution is alright and also SoundHack has some awesome Mutation and convolution processes.


4

It depends on the agreements made between the dialogue editor/supervisor and the sound supervisor. Mixers could prefer to not have volume automation, but this differs. Why do you ask? Are you editing dialogue? Or are you mixing the movie? Recommended reading: Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures


4

I usually have my Dial editors only do very basic level adjustments. Basically lower any really loud pfx or a line that is dramatically out of sorts with the rest of the scene. With noise reduction, I never want my editor to do any broadband NR or notch filtering. You can get into a lot of unnecessary processing that might not be needed once everything ...


4

Record 2 mono claps/pulses/shots, however you're generating it. Move the mic from one side of the room to the other for each, keeping each at the same distance from the source. Match up the initial claps later, save as stereo. It won't be perfect, but no-one except you will ever know ;-)


4

Route the output of each track to another empty track. Record arm the destination tracks and then hit record. When the record pass is done all your effects and automation will be "printed" to the new tracks.


4

This is a very big topic, I will start by redirecting you to a very useful site/article: Mastering for Vinyl from Recording magazine. Also I would like to state that I'm not a mastering engineer, I'm a mixing engineer only working with analog gear, so I'll try to tell you what we keep in mind when going for vinyl. The article is far more detailed and ...


4

If it was recorded with one microphone, there is no good way to rectify this problem. Vocals and guitars share the same frequencies, so EQ is out of the picture. Sorry.


4

I don't know if any of the following will work or not, but maybe worth an experiment. Try a delay of about 1/2 of a millisecond, if you have the capability, between the two channels, of the mono signal. The goal is for the delay to match the amount of time it takes a sound to travel from one ear to the other. I can't remember the exact number--something ...


3

I made the switch to PC for my home system over two years ago now. I haven't had any issues, and I occassionally move projects between my system at home and at work (where I use a Mac). Most of the time, I use flash based media or data DVDs to transfer files. You'll only have trouble reading from flash based media if you format it on a Mac (no issue if you ...


3

From my experience with dialogue editorial, you're usually SOL when it comes to this - the problem being that handling noise tend to fill all frequencies. Depending on how the frequency content is from what you're hearing, a hi pass may help you, automated of course, but even then usually such noise sits too high into the mid-lows and mids (like a plosive) ...


3

construct the new edit at a different location on the timeline to avoid confusion. If the picture start at 1 hour, do it at 4 hours for example. also means if something goes wrong you have the old layout available. If your changes are listed as 'add x frames here', 'cut x frames there' etc, then you will have to translate that into a series of cut and pastes ...


3

Your instinct is correct - a reasonable way to deal with this using Audacity would be to copy the section to a second (stereo) track, shifted in position so that an earlier piece aligns with the giggle. Then use the 'envelope' tool to shape the volume profile of each track. Since the replacement section was earlier in time, lower its volume enough to match ...


3

It does depend but most will apply it early in the chain especially if it's an offline process like Izotope Denoiser. It's much easier for the software to work if the noise floor isn't moving around and being compressed, expanded, clip gained, volume automation etc.


3

Speech is anything but "well-rounded". Vowels start at the vocal cords with basically the most overtone-rich signal possible, a pulse train. If you look at the frequency content of such a pulse train, the Fourier transform domain actually also shows a pulse train with (constant-peak) pulses at the multiples of the fundamental frequency. This is the "...


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