8

Whoo-whee, that's a subjective area...that's also really fun! Can't wait to see the answers here. Starting with what works (and, granted, is cliched) doesn't hurt: Striking thin metal wires or springs under tension with other metallic objects. Good for base layers and achieving the baseline Star Wars or Wall-E sound, even if you do it just as an exercise to ...


7

Hi This will only cause phase problems if it's routed to the same output as the stereo-pair. Except this won't be a stereo pair. Recording vocals in stereo is pointless, small movements between mics are translated as large movements between speakers. (MS is or Binaural works though) Usually one mic is either a) fail-safe b) different gain or both. The third ...


6

Noise Reduction always makes things sound different, not necessarily better. Not everything needs to be pristine.


5

A couple of thoughts. Go to a trade show like AES or NAB. Many of the dealers have mics set up on the floor feeding a preamp with headphones. Also, a few dealers will lend out demo mics for you to check out. That being said, field recording and sound design is such a niche field, that there is no way to check out all of the gear before you buy. I bought my ...


5

Pink noise. I know it sounds a little crazy, but it can work. I had a really short turn around on a project recently, and didn't have time to mess with layering up more than 3 or 4 crowd recordings. I just didn't have time to search for and audition more recordings. I started thinking about my own experiences and remembered how noise-like the crowd can be ...


5

how about: don't use bright mics on bright sources also, headphone gain affects an actor's read. edited to add: don't eq things when they're soloed out - eq relies on context


4

Hi audiLE, I have had the same problems in the past where I have been sound editor/designer and not the on set recorder. What I suggest is you first ask for any room tones they may have recorded. If they are clean and well recorded then you may be able to mask some of the background noise. If they are not usable then its going to be even more difficult ...


4

Try to run sounds through a fast doppler and layer those sounds together with real world weapons and wire sounds. Could be a way to give each laser sound a subtle character. Try to experiment with feedback loops and run it through a doppler. It's already late and these ideas are all that came into my mind. I hope that you can use them.


4

As the old saying goes... "nothing to it, but to do it"... I routinely check all my deliverables COMPLETELY before sending them out. Yes it's a pain, yes it takes time, but yes, it saves those annoying voicemails for the most part. Visually check all your waveforms, double check all your routings, if the program is long, at least do spot checks on all the ...


4

A gem from Randy Thom: An omnidirectional mic placed close enough to a sound source becomes effectively directional. It's all about S:N! :-)


4

Spend more time watching the video and less time with your eyes glued to Pro Tools. This is something I try to keep in mind because it can be so easy to get sucked into the computer screen. Automation Preview mode is also a god send.


4

When designing a layered effect, mute layers/regions once in a while- What can't be heard/felt is only clogging up your signal path Low frequency energy adds up really quickly


4

I am thrilled to have this community and I have learned so much from so many questions and answers here. The previous responses touch on many great answers and I agree with them all. But, to me, the most important things that I have taken to heart from SSD are two concepts underlying the whole board that are constantly reinforced. “There are naive ...


4

Honestly, I just use whatever I have - even if all I have is mono. Never let the equipment get in the way of a good roomtone (or for that matter, ambience). I certainly agree with @Guido that high quality gear is best suited for roomtone to obtain the most robust S/N, but beyond that, I'm pretty loose about this type of recording. Roomtone is one of those ...


4

Right off the top of my head [& I'm not a foley artist, so you'd have to work out the details] elements... sharp points to feet - high transients lots of legs - 'skittering' rhythmic walk - pattern that could become 'signature'... & don't forget ...big, so lots of things dropped an octave, added subs 'skin' movement noises, not synced to ...


4

I don't know if any of the following will work or not, but maybe worth an experiment. Try a delay of about 1/2 of a millisecond, if you have the capability, between the two channels, of the mono signal. The goal is for the delay to match the amount of time it takes a sound to travel from one ear to the other. I can't remember the exact number--something ...


3

Hi, Benjie! You have already very nice suggestions above and I'd like to share mine too: very recently, by accident, I step into a sonority very close to the laser thing. (Apart from handling the gun and other great details that should make the difference) I took a file of a metal impact with some reverb on it, reversed it (here I might choose to keep the ...


3

Hey! I'm just going through exactly the same problem! I came up with some simple things who had reduced like 70% of the noise 40-50% of reverb. The scenario was just the same: 3 people having dialogue, one shotgun terribly placed, an empty bar with no furniture and large windows. Most of the noise came from refrigereting machines. My advice is as if don't ...


3

Using noise removal plugs such as RX or XNoise as sound design tools rather than for noise removal. For example, take a longish, constant waveform that has some variation in it dynamically like a backhoe digging a ditch. By either using extreme settings or swapping over to difference monitoring you can create some very unique source material with a little ...


3

I 100% agree with Tim. Let the stage make the decision. The ONLY EQ I ever (rarely) use in the edit is a 12-18dB/oct high pass rolloff at 80Hz on the Master if the production mixer left me with some nasty low end, but that's only if the low end is so bad that you can actually see the modulations and its making every single minute sub-frame edit snap ...


3

The ear-scene in Reservoir Dogs was the first thing that came to my mind too. The second ting that came to my mind was a movie (and a book) that's full of music that (kind of) juxtaposes the scene (at least if we're not to look at the scene from Alex' psychopathic view)... ...A Clockwork Orange, a movie full of contrapuntal/anempathic/juxtapositional/...


3

This can be done a couple of ways and which way really depends on the most appropriate blend to best support the image. You can either gradually fade a track to a lower volume using a volume envelope, or discreetly have it drop on a dime using the same tool. Let's say I want to have the music drop 6 dB but not completely cut out so I can hear the dialogue ...


3

The "morph" you're describing is known as (both) spectral cross-modulation, and spectral convolution. From what i've read in your question, I gather you're interested in essentially crossfading the two sounds together, but in the frequency domain not the time domain? If that's indeed the case then there are a few ways to go about doing this. you can either ...


3

Instead of simply listing practical details about how you're making your sounds (eg. types of mics, foley techniques and so forth), you might consider making more theory-based speculations about why certain sounds, or qualities of sound, are appropriate to convey the particular messages that you're trying to convey; how they create meaning for the listener ...


3

I'm going to write about how I would record a trumpet. First off, I don't like the recorded sound to be neutral when I'm mixing. I want it to be pre-mixed in the recording process. If the trumpet will be playing a lead, I want a recorded sound that is big and tall and brash and will muscle all the other sounds out of the way all by itself when I bring the ...


2

First example to come to mind is the "Danny Boy" scene from Millers Crossing ... terribly effective, IMO...


2

I love this scene from American Psycho. Oh and I agree, great topic…


2

My signal flow varies, but i follow this flow for most large mixes, it not only makes it digestible to combine 100's of sounds into a few minutes, but it saves cpu power. audio track > it's stem (aux) > stem master fader > stem track > (print this, and disable all above tracks, you can go back to the later if need be) printed stems stem track* > Master ...


2

The example that comes to my mind is the scene from the bollywood movie Mera Naam Joker {my name is joker} where the prtagonist receives the news of his mother's death while the audience claps and cheers in the background.:)


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