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I am thrilled to have this community and I have learned so much from so many questions and answers here. The previous responses touch on many great answers and I agree with them all. But, to me, the most important things that I have taken to heart from SSD are two concepts underlying the whole board that are constantly reinforced. “There are naive ...


4

Honestly, I just use whatever I have - even if all I have is mono. Never let the equipment get in the way of a good roomtone (or for that matter, ambience). I certainly agree with @Guido that high quality gear is best suited for roomtone to obtain the most robust S/N, but beyond that, I'm pretty loose about this type of recording. Roomtone is one of those ...


4

Right off the top of my head [& I'm not a foley artist, so you'd have to work out the details] elements... sharp points to feet - high transients lots of legs - 'skittering' rhythmic walk - pattern that could become 'signature'... & don't forget ...big, so lots of things dropped an octave, added subs 'skin' movement noises, not synced to ...


4

I don't know if any of the following will work or not, but maybe worth an experiment. Try a delay of about 1/2 of a millisecond, if you have the capability, between the two channels, of the mono signal. The goal is for the delay to match the amount of time it takes a sound to travel from one ear to the other. I can't remember the exact number--something ...


3

The "morph" you're describing is known as (both) spectral cross-modulation, and spectral convolution. From what i've read in your question, I gather you're interested in essentially crossfading the two sounds together, but in the frequency domain not the time domain? If that's indeed the case then there are a few ways to go about doing this. you can either ...


3

Instead of simply listing practical details about how you're making your sounds (eg. types of mics, foley techniques and so forth), you might consider making more theory-based speculations about why certain sounds, or qualities of sound, are appropriate to convey the particular messages that you're trying to convey; how they create meaning for the listener ...


3

I'm going to write about how I would record a trumpet. First off, I don't like the recorded sound to be neutral when I'm mixing. I want it to be pre-mixed in the recording process. If the trumpet will be playing a lead, I want a recorded sound that is big and tall and brash and will muscle all the other sounds out of the way all by itself when I bring the ...


3

Yes, it is simply a compressor - typically you'd use one with a relatively low threshold and ratio. And some may store metadata for the whole track once it has been compressed/normalised once. I know my car stereo could do that - would zip through new tracks to identify peaks and normalise against them. You don't need predictive normalisation though - ...


3

It's 'simply a compressor'... however it's a very specialised type of compressor. There are probably others in this field, but the go-to name for radio compression is Optimod by Orban Optimod is, to over-simplify, a multi-band compressor specifically made for radio transmission & includes specific timing & frequency compensation for the way radio ...


2

My signal flow varies, but i follow this flow for most large mixes, it not only makes it digestible to combine 100's of sounds into a few minutes, but it saves cpu power. audio track > it's stem (aux) > stem master fader > stem track > (print this, and disable all above tracks, you can go back to the later if need be) printed stems stem track* > Master ...


2

It's a good question, and I hope more people will answer. Of course there's tons of useful stuff on SSD so it's difficult to choose! I guess sometimes you read something which totally changes your thought process in a particular area, gives you a completely different angle on a problem. I think these are the real gems - not learning a new keyboard shortcut (...


2

The majority of that video sounds like granular synthesis. You can find components that do this in Ableton Live, Reaktor, or Max/MSP. I think MOTU ship an awesome granular in MachFive. Or you can google Imperial Grains or a PC equivalent. Re the little sounds sprinkled all over the video, many are microsampled bits such as metal and glass particles (or you ...


2

Try shooting various metal things with a slingshot past a microphone


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If you have Reaktor, then try S-Layer: http://twistedtools.com/shop/reaktor/s-layer/


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I've just watched the longplay of Super Mario 3D Land, and have some advice for you. I work with casual games for about a year, and those sounds is from my type of work. The basic rule for this SFX's is "imagine, that everything is tiny". It's like living in a toy world. The sounds is more rounded and all envelopes is as glide as possible. In foley try to ...


2

Take omnidirectional microphones! In contrast do cardioids, omnidirectional microphones captures much more low end. This gives you the andvantage that your room tones will also have something in the lows instead of cardiodid records. Cardioid microphones cut's bass frequencies which is good for voice and music. For rooms, it makes it thin. In post ...


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From the top of my head, the book "Sound Design" by David Sonnenschein is a very good start! I'm on my second read-through on it myself right now :-)


2

Although the focus is on sound design for theatre, Ross Brown's Sound: A Reader in Theatre Practice is a brilliant resource with a wide-ranging bibliography. 'Reader'-type books are great for initial research for this very reason: someone else has gathered all the essential reading into one book! As @Arran says, theory-based texts about why we use sound are ...


2

I think this little project going to be dependent on your desire as well as budget. You probably already know this. Getting the audio into digital format isn't all that difficult. There are a lot of different turntables which automatically do this for you now (some doing direct Vinyl to SD card MP3 conversions). Else, you can always just run Audacity on ...


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The main thing you will want to do is to enhance the bass part of the spectrum in order to enhance realism. Obviously increased level will be necessary (relevant to other elements in the mix) but the bass part of the mix will be the most important in order to enhance realism.


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Robert Henke's Granulator 2 M4L device does wonders. I find myself using it more and more, even for stuff that doesn't require granular synthesis. https://www.ableton.com/en/blog/granulator-ii-robert-henkes-max-live-instrument-updated-live-9/ Also, Spectrum Sampler: http://www.amazingnoises.com/am/?p=78


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Sounds like that are mostly granular synthesis and wavetables. Fast/fun easy way is to convert .exe files into .pcm files then open them with audacity. Probably not quite what you have in mind though.


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Chris, what happens when you move the mic another button down?


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I second Jesse's comment. The octave above the fundamental, which usually sits between 200-300 Hz is the 'box' frequency that presents so many problems. This simple roll off + Notch should fix the problem. If this is still not working then first of all check the mic is working properly (perhaps swap the mics around the presenters) and if all else fails try ...


1

Hey Chris, have you tried notching the 2nd or 3rd harmonic in the presenter's voice? I sometimes find that this creates more boomy-ness than the actual fundamental frequency. You can search for it using a boost with a high Q setting or use an EQ with a spectral analyzer such as Fabfilter Pro-Q. Also try hunting for some vocal clarity just below 2k and giving ...


1

Granular (+ automation obviously), microediting and creating stutters/rolls (by hand or e.g. by automating sample start and end points in samplers in loop mode. Optionally automate their volume and pitch to create movement and adjust their timing or try reversing the rolls or individual samples in them.) and careful layering of different clicks and pops for ...


1

Both Michael & Alex have the right idea. a great start is to use wind tone, add a highly resonant eq to get that sharp singing "note"... then run it through your dopplers as fast as you can. both GRM tools & Waves doppler are very good for this. then I'd also add in some of the flying debris as well. if you set up a mic in a hallway (or long room) ...


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While actually recording those sounds would be best (see Michael Manzke's post), I've had success in the past with taking various windy sounds and dopplershifting them quite severely. You could even try varispeeding whooshes. EDIT: If you don't have a doppler plug-in, you can also try automating the frequency of a resonant EQ.


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I tend to agree with Mark's answer above. For me the two main aspect of Sound Design are the HOW and the WHY. Although the HOW questions can be very interesting and there are always new techniques to learn, as you gain more technical experience they tend to just build on known principles. However, the WHY seems to become more interesting. As a result, ...


1

I like the fact that every problem creates numerous solutions. Its reassuring to know there's very little fixed ways, and everyone is willing to adapt and learn every day :)


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