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Talking to schizophrenics for advice how it sounds won't necessarily do you much good as we're not talking something like an LSD-trip or such here, we're talking a state that appears totally natural to the senses of the one suffering it, and this differs from person to person, as well as there are rarely dronings or similar sounds present. With rarely I mean ...


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You can also look at the David Sonnenschein book Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. The first 25 pages gives you a really good idea of what to look for and how to listen to your script and make notes. Within the first 25 pages, Sonnenschien recommends that you take the script, whatever the version and read ...


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The first thing is, don't make it totally gone at any point. Listen to the audio of medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy; the sound never really leaves the soundtrack completely. Fade it down and up, but not completely out. Second, use viewpoint changes in the camera editing to adjust the level of the sound; take the opportunities when the camera moves ...


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You're not going to find anything worth using that you can buy for that budget. My suggestion would be to find a local shop that rents gear out and talk to them about what you'll be shooting and how. They'll be able to give you advice on what to use and how, and you'll likely get better equipment for the money you'll be spending. Granted, you won't own the ...


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Highly relevant, you will enjoy digesting the many examples in here: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ShellShockSilence Mass Effect games also have this effect when you're "low health", a low-pass filter blurs the music until you recover:


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I really like Kyoshi Kurosawa's work. His style is very spartan and almost lo fi, sonically. Two films to check out are Pulse and Cure (Tokyo Sonata is another). Dead silence is used at certain points in these films, and the effect it has in each case is interesting. His films can be difficult to watch if you're not in the right mood, but his style is ...


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Go to a party. Make sure they don't play any music whether diagetic or non. Record it from a similar perspective to the camera. Put it in your track.


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Sounds like a great idea. Is this work undergrad or postgrad? Sadly I've not seen any of the films you are suggesting (I really need to catch up on viewing). However, one thing that jumps out at me is these films are all dramas. Is this what you are going for i.e. is the title of you dissertation going to be "Layers of diagetic sound showing Temporal ...


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one character that sprang to mind is Arby from the Channel Four series 'Utopia'. If you haven't watched it, it's definitely worth checking out and the theme music is awesome too. Anyway, this character Arby has been given a continuous, out of breath foley aspect, almost as if he's really unfit. I'm pretty sure the majority of this has been added in post. The ...


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You should watch Eraser Head, by David Lynch. It may not be specifically depicting his mental illness but it certainly sets a mood of mental weirdness between the characters and that strange baby creature. Most of it, comes from the eerie sound design in the ambience.


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Sound Mixer or Sound Recordist


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Do you memorize the dialogue and aim the microphone back and forth between the two people when their lines come up? yes This allow you to anticipate one's sentences ending and be on place for beginning of next character's sentence. Notice that it's important that your microphone is aimed at the person speaking. Which means your microphone can be between ...


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When both persons speaking are visible I memorize the lines while the actors practice (having a script at hand might be helpful) and pan the mic between both. If the scene is split into shot/ reverse shot, I also try to get both but my priority lies on the person on-screen. Especialy when the boom operator isn't experienced, too much panning might overburden ...


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To my ears, it does indeed sound as if there is too much build-up in the lower mids. I wouldn't say "muddy", but rather more boomy, boxy, or honky - those are three words I would use to describe it. Cutting these will clean it up for you, but as you said, this was definitely miked too close. Two more things to keep in mind for dlog editing: 1) You will ...


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If it's just dialog that you are recording then rent a couple lav mics if you can then make sure the audio coming off them is nice and usable. The problem with a hypercardioid mic in a reflective room like that is there are always going to be significant secondary reflections off of those hard surfaces. Because a lav is so close to the source those ...


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The harshness of the compression is similar to API's boxes. It might be one, although I never can remember the number of model. The cool "damaged" sound are most certainly an artifact from (very likely Cedar) noise-reduction, EQ, and probably a mild distorsion to make it pop in the trailer. It's pretty safe to say it will sound different in the final film. ...


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Scan through this search query for some possible answers. This question has been discussed in the old SSD forum many times over.


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It's a pure sinus of about 1400 Hz (1.4 Khz), most DAW's will have a function to generate a few seconds of that. In Adobe Audition you would go to the menu Generate -> Tones. Then add some "dirt" to it using something like Izotope Vinyl (it's a free plugin). I guess that would be the basics of what you want. Maybe instead of adding dirt, subtracting some "...


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Isn't the famous long telephone ring in "Once Upon A Time In America" a temporal ambiguity while being a diagetic layered sound?


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Your best bet is to probably look for production companies in the area and see if you can work with any of them. Generally, a lot of the production guys in an area know each other from working on projects and it's typically a pretty informal network. The best bet is to start out with an actual production company and get to know people from there. They ...


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Check out Kaneto Shindo, especially Onibaba. Kurasawa, I like The Bad Sleep Well a lot, Ozu, Naruse. I also really rate Tomu Uchida, if you can get a copy you must watch Killing in Yoshiwara. +1 for Kyoshi Kurosawa too. I've been meaning to get round to watching more of Kinji Fukasaku's films (of Battle Royale fame), so maybe that's a good idea too.


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I think these guys have provided some great answers, but one answer I'm not seeing is to morph the sound. The idea being, the beeping monitor sound changes to something else over a period of time. Slowly morph the sound using filters, distortion, oscillators or other sound fx. You could also morph the sound into another sound, and since a heartbeat is ...


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Try adding a Low-Pass filter to the beeping sound and automating it. The more high frequency is cut out, it will sound as if it's fading out.


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Keith gave you some great tips already. In particular, the idea of change is a key psychoacoustic cue to pay attention to something. The more regular and static a particular sound is, and the longer it remains that way, the more likely we are to ignore it. Get it to the point where we are ignoring it, and any little change draws your attention back to it. ...


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Wow this sounds like quite a challenge, in two ways. First of all, your description of the movie and the director is a bit negative or at least ironic. Is that on purpose? It makes me get the feeling that you actually don't like to work on this movie, but perhaps that's your 'english'. Second: The way you describe the scene is lacking valuable information ...


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