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7

When I establish, or experience, sound design based on a concept, that usually means a set of overarching design principles or themes that act as a set of heuristics that can guide decisions - and critiques - made along the way. Is it intended to compliment or contrast the emotional tone of a scene? Are there emotive descriptors that can be used to influence ...


5

No list would be complete without Chewbacca and the dinosaurs from Jurassic Park. I also liked the language in District 9. Ultimately I'm impressed by any language design work that sounds organic but otherworldly.


4

district 9 easily jumps to the top of my list. (57 seconds in) [youtube]pHihFA8q8xI#t=57s[/youtube] how to train your dragon was loaded up with tons of cool sounds [youtube]88x08ePynt0[/youtube] Lord of the rings Balrog (made with concrete and wood!) [youtube]JLclk16PtE4[/youtube] also the mouth of sauron was fun. [youtube]8FfRRpRAHI0&feature=...


4

A few unmentioned ones come to mind: Pixar's "Brave" -- the work with Bear vocals is very impressive and incredibly expressive. R2D2 -- we cannot forget the emotive beeps and whirrs And an honorable mention for "The Lost Thing", an incredible animation film. I first discovered it when www.soundworkscollection.com did a segment on the sound design. The ...


4

i think i know what you mean, like give you almost a physical reaction... the famous "bite the curb...' scene in american history x... just that sound of the teeth on the concrete is what scares me the most and makes me want to turn away... i also remember in 127 hours when he has to place the knife to the nerve endings in his arm and there is an almost ...


4

I had a scene in a short film I did last year where I did something fun. The film is a period piece, so no modern sounds anywhere. A woman is sitting alone in a room contemplating a potion she's in the process of making that will kill her unborn child - saving it from her abusive husband. I put a clock in the room (even though there wasn't one ...


4

Here is my choice: http://www.amazon.com/Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures-Invisible/dp/0240809181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361733846&sr=8-1&keywords=dialogue+editing+for+motion+pictures http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Art-Motion-Picture-Sound/dp/0240812409/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361733899&sr=1-1&keywords=practical+art+of+...


4

Heh. Welcome to the rest of your career. :) I fall more into the "client is always right" camp. I think it's my job to speak up when I disagree and educate the clients just as you have done but at the end of the day, they're the ones who have sweat blood over this film for months, if not years on end, and the director always always gets the last word. "...


4

Talking to schizophrenics for advice how it sounds won't necessarily do you much good as we're not talking something like an LSD-trip or such here, we're talking a state that appears totally natural to the senses of the one suffering it, and this differs from person to person, as well as there are rarely dronings or similar sounds present. With rarely I mean ...


3

No Country For Old Men did it for me when I remember seeing that for the first time.


3

This question is way too broad. there are pleny of places you can read up on personal techniques and mixing preferences on the web. I say this to help you...this kind of question is a bad way to approach people who can share knowledge with you. Take the time to educate yourself and develop informed...and specific...questions. You'll develop some of your own ...


3

What you're asking here is basically like asking how to build a car from scratch, in detail. Not only is it extremely technical, different cars demand different ways to be built. Same goes here. A good book to read how 5.1 works and why is Tomlinson Holmans - 5.1 Up And Running. The only true rule is: You do what you must. Nothing more, nothing less. What ...


3

Plus one for Touch the Sound. There's a great old newsreel called "Back of the Mike" which shows a radio play performance in action, complete with live sound effects performance. You can watch it here. I also dig "Fog City Mavericks" a documentary about Bay Area Filmmakers (Coppola, Lucas etc.) and how they influenced the cinema world, including film sound....


3

Some conceptual reasons have been expressed by Walter Murch and Michel Chion: mono/stereo centre the viewer's focus on the screen and diegetic world, further supporting the suspension of disbelief. Having sounds emanating from the physical theatre space can draw the audience's attention the fact that they are in a cinema and divides their attention between ...


3

A lot of people are mentioning cost and overlooking the concept of aesthetic choice (props to Brendan Rehill for mentioning it). Multichannel surround isn't necessarily the best choice for all theatrically distributed films. Documentaries are a prime example. Yes, you can mix a documentary in surround (and some/many do), but few suffer aesthetically in 2 (or ...


3

I find that my own suspension of disbelief tends to arise from synthesized sounds, as opposed to recontextualized field recordings. This is true of a lot of genre films (Escape from New York, Solaris, and untold hundreds of other horror and sci-fi films), but even recent films such as Terminator Salvation, where the sound design of some of the 'bots was so ...


3

Kevin, Check out this video on calibrating your studio speakers to a standard monitoring level: http://vimeo.com/22735507 Calibrate to 79dB for a home studio. If you don't have an SPL meter, you can download one on a smartphone and it will do just fine. It's might be a bit louder than you're used to. Once you're all calibrated, watch a film or show that ...


3

As said above, you want to calibrate your playback environment first. Than, in my experience, with dialogue you want to be hitting equal to about -27 DB LEQ(a) up the center channel, usually measured on a stage with a Dolby LM100. That usually results in your dialogue average meter sitting around -16 dB to -12dB with peaks hitting around -6dB, maybe as hot ...


3

I like the voice of the little transformer that hacks into the airplane's network on the first movie. It's kind of an evil funny machine!


3

If it's for dialogue I'd try and buy a secondhand MKH416. If you had to buy new right away then a K6/ME66. I honestly don't think anything below these is worth owning as they all lack sensitivity and are too noisy. If this wasn't an option I'd hire instead.


3

NOTE: this response was to the original iteration of the question. To be perfectly honest, this question rubs me the wrong way - a first actually. What rubs me the wrong way, and this is merely an observation of principal and NOT a judgement of personality/character... is that I sense a lack of gratitude, a lack of appreciation for what has been had and ...


3

The first thing is, don't make it totally gone at any point. Listen to the audio of medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy; the sound never really leaves the soundtrack completely. Fade it down and up, but not completely out. Second, use viewpoint changes in the camera editing to adjust the level of the sound; take the opportunities when the camera moves ...


3

You can also look at the David Sonnenschein book Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. The first 25 pages gives you a really good idea of what to look for and how to listen to your script and make notes. Within the first 25 pages, Sonnenschien recommends that you take the script, whatever the version and read ...


3

You're not going to find anything worth using that you can buy for that budget. My suggestion would be to find a local shop that rents gear out and talk to them about what you'll be shooting and how. They'll be able to give you advice on what to use and how, and you'll likely get better equipment for the money you'll be spending. Granted, you won't own the ...


3

Highly relevant, you will enjoy digesting the many examples in here: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ShellShockSilence Mass Effect games also have this effect when you're "low health", a low-pass filter blurs the music until you recover:


2

Ingmar Bergman is probably one of the best one's who intensively used silence in hie films.


2

The example that comes to my mind is the scene from the bollywood movie Mera Naam Joker {my name is joker} where the prtagonist receives the news of his mother's death while the audience claps and cheers in the background.:)


2

I agree with Shaun, network TV usually tops out at -10dBFS. I know soome primetime dramas top out at -6dB with a brickwall (at least as far as their final DVCAM output goes). For a regular theatrical mix, I don't do any 'mastering' beyond what global plugin's I have on each of my submaster feeds to the stems. Even then, the only submaster I have plugnis ...


2

Wild Strawberries The Seventh Seal Cries and Whispers by Ingmar Bergman are the best ones to study the excellent use of silence in a film. Besides these a few of my personal favourites include Peeping Tom, The Conversation, Once Upon A Time In The West and OFCOURSE Apocalypse Now! A lotta films are going through my head right now, these are a few.


2

Touch the Sound. It's a documentary about Evelyn Glennie, a deaf percussionist (and an amazing one at that). The first 17=20 minutes is primarily sound montage...there's some dialog in that stretch, but it's very sparse. It's a must watch for any sound editor/designer/mixer, in my humble opinion.


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