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7

When I establish, or experience, sound design based on a concept, that usually means a set of overarching design principles or themes that act as a set of heuristics that can guide decisions - and critiques - made along the way. Is it intended to compliment or contrast the emotional tone of a scene? Are there emotive descriptors that can be used to influence ...


5

No list would be complete without Chewbacca and the dinosaurs from Jurassic Park. I also liked the language in District 9. Ultimately I'm impressed by any language design work that sounds organic but otherworldly.


4

I would bring your basic kit. Film sets are crazy places. Someone somewhere always forgets something. Something unexpected always breaks at exactly the wrong time. There's no shame in being over-prepared.


4

Hi Mitchell, This is an interesting question and one that is rooted in the history of cinema. Before the days of readily-available digital workstations and non-linear editing, film was cut on just that: Film. This magnetic medium had its limitations, one of which being how much film could actually fit on a reel. There were "A" reels (around 1000') and "AB" ...


4

I would make sure that the Quicktimes have a timecode window burn-in. It's also important to make sure that the TC rate that you'll be cutting sound at matches the Quicktime burn-in. Time code for reel 1 should be start at 01:00:00:00, reel 2 at 02:00:00:00, etc.


4

It's definitely not a pointless question. Here's what I'm taking with me to Edinburgh for my Masters program. 2008 MacBook Pro, upgraded to 4-gigs of RAM H4n handheld recorder ProTools 9 M-Box 2 mini Akai MPK MIDI controller Lacie Rikki 1TB external hard drive That's pretty much it. I've refrained from buying application specific tools like shotgun ...


4

I strongly recommend you to get a copy of Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema by David Sonnenschein. It will give you a good idea of all the elements to look out for in sound design for film.


4

district 9 easily jumps to the top of my list. (57 seconds in) [youtube]pHihFA8q8xI#t=57s[/youtube] how to train your dragon was loaded up with tons of cool sounds [youtube]88x08ePynt0[/youtube] Lord of the rings Balrog (made with concrete and wood!) [youtube]JLclk16PtE4[/youtube] also the mouth of sauron was fun. [youtube]8FfRRpRAHI0&feature=...


4

A few unmentioned ones come to mind: Pixar's "Brave" -- the work with Bear vocals is very impressive and incredibly expressive. R2D2 -- we cannot forget the emotive beeps and whirrs And an honorable mention for "The Lost Thing", an incredible animation film. I first discovered it when www.soundworkscollection.com did a segment on the sound design. The ...


4

i think i know what you mean, like give you almost a physical reaction... the famous "bite the curb...' scene in american history x... just that sound of the teeth on the concrete is what scares me the most and makes me want to turn away... i also remember in 127 hours when he has to place the knife to the nerve endings in his arm and there is an almost ...


4

I had a scene in a short film I did last year where I did something fun. The film is a period piece, so no modern sounds anywhere. A woman is sitting alone in a room contemplating a potion she's in the process of making that will kill her unborn child - saving it from her abusive husband. I put a clock in the room (even though there wasn't one ...


4

Here is my choice: http://www.amazon.com/Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures-Invisible/dp/0240809181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361733846&sr=8-1&keywords=dialogue+editing+for+motion+pictures http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Art-Motion-Picture-Sound/dp/0240812409/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361733899&sr=1-1&keywords=practical+art+of+...


4

Heh. Welcome to the rest of your career. :) I fall more into the "client is always right" camp. I think it's my job to speak up when I disagree and educate the clients just as you have done but at the end of the day, they're the ones who have sweat blood over this film for months, if not years on end, and the director always always gets the last word. "...


4

Talking to schizophrenics for advice how it sounds won't necessarily do you much good as we're not talking something like an LSD-trip or such here, we're talking a state that appears totally natural to the senses of the one suffering it, and this differs from person to person, as well as there are rarely dronings or similar sounds present. With rarely I mean ...


3

once upon a time in the west (first half hour is amazing!) fargo (the cardoor beeps in the snowy landscape at the first crimescene, incredibly funny) ofrret/sacrifice (just beautiful and appropriate sound design) we own the night (epic carchase!) magnolia (music and sound in perfect harmony) solaris (both tarkovsky and soderbergh's are great, atmospheres are ...


3

Watch Tetro for beautiful foley and sound design. And Sound of Noise for really nice musical approach on sound! :)


3

The ear-scene in Reservoir Dogs was the first thing that came to my mind too. The second ting that came to my mind was a movie (and a book) that's full of music that (kind of) juxtaposes the scene (at least if we're not to look at the scene from Alex' psychopathic view)... ...A Clockwork Orange, a movie full of contrapuntal/anempathic/juxtapositional/...


3

Its interesting that no one has mentioned the main differences between master faders and aux in either thread. For future readers, master fader plugin inserts are post fader, whereas all other channel types have insert before the fader. So its not a good idea to ride master fader gain feeding into a compressor (limiters are different obviously). One other ...


3

As I understand it, if this film is ever destined to be projected, you should ask for it to be broken into reels (1000 ft or as close to it as possible) by your picture editor. If you have the opportunity to recommend where the reel break happens, choose a location where if a projection hiccup occurs it is the least disruptive to your soundtrack.


3

My advice - don't buy anything until you get to class. First week or so, they'll tell you what you need for your course work. In most cases, it's cheaper/easier to use lab computers - they're beefed up with everything you could possibly want (plugins, hardware, software), and it's part of your tuition anyway. Why spend money on top of the expense of ...


3

What you're asking here is basically like asking how to build a car from scratch, in detail. Not only is it extremely technical, different cars demand different ways to be built. Same goes here. A good book to read how 5.1 works and why is Tomlinson Holmans - 5.1 Up And Running. The only true rule is: You do what you must. Nothing more, nothing less. What ...


3

This question is way too broad. there are pleny of places you can read up on personal techniques and mixing preferences on the web. I say this to help you...this kind of question is a bad way to approach people who can share knowledge with you. Take the time to educate yourself and develop informed...and specific...questions. You'll develop some of your own ...


3

No Country For Old Men did it for me when I remember seeing that for the first time.


3

Plus one for Touch the Sound. There's a great old newsreel called "Back of the Mike" which shows a radio play performance in action, complete with live sound effects performance. You can watch it here. I also dig "Fog City Mavericks" a documentary about Bay Area Filmmakers (Coppola, Lucas etc.) and how they influenced the cinema world, including film sound....


3

Some conceptual reasons have been expressed by Walter Murch and Michel Chion: mono/stereo centre the viewer's focus on the screen and diegetic world, further supporting the suspension of disbelief. Having sounds emanating from the physical theatre space can draw the audience's attention the fact that they are in a cinema and divides their attention between ...


3

A lot of people are mentioning cost and overlooking the concept of aesthetic choice (props to Brendan Rehill for mentioning it). Multichannel surround isn't necessarily the best choice for all theatrically distributed films. Documentaries are a prime example. Yes, you can mix a documentary in surround (and some/many do), but few suffer aesthetically in 2 (or ...


3

I find that my own suspension of disbelief tends to arise from synthesized sounds, as opposed to recontextualized field recordings. This is true of a lot of genre films (Escape from New York, Solaris, and untold hundreds of other horror and sci-fi films), but even recent films such as Terminator Salvation, where the sound design of some of the 'bots was so ...


3

Kevin, Check out this video on calibrating your studio speakers to a standard monitoring level: http://vimeo.com/22735507 Calibrate to 79dB for a home studio. If you don't have an SPL meter, you can download one on a smartphone and it will do just fine. It's might be a bit louder than you're used to. Once you're all calibrated, watch a film or show that ...


3

As said above, you want to calibrate your playback environment first. Than, in my experience, with dialogue you want to be hitting equal to about -27 DB LEQ(a) up the center channel, usually measured on a stage with a Dolby LM100. That usually results in your dialogue average meter sitting around -16 dB to -12dB with peaks hitting around -6dB, maybe as hot ...


3

I like the voice of the little transformer that hacks into the airplane's network on the first movie. It's kind of an evil funny machine!


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