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5

No list would be complete without Chewbacca and the dinosaurs from Jurassic Park. I also liked the language in District 9. Ultimately I'm impressed by any language design work that sounds organic but otherworldly.


4

i think i know what you mean, like give you almost a physical reaction... the famous "bite the curb...' scene in american history x... just that sound of the teeth on the concrete is what scares me the most and makes me want to turn away... i also remember in 127 hours when he has to place the knife to the nerve endings in his arm and there is an almost ...


4

A few unmentioned ones come to mind: Pixar's "Brave" -- the work with Bear vocals is very impressive and incredibly expressive. R2D2 -- we cannot forget the emotive beeps and whirrs And an honorable mention for "The Lost Thing", an incredible animation film. I first discovered it when www.soundworkscollection.com did a segment on the sound design. The ...


4

district 9 easily jumps to the top of my list. (57 seconds in) [youtube]pHihFA8q8xI#t=57s[/youtube] how to train your dragon was loaded up with tons of cool sounds [youtube]88x08ePynt0[/youtube] Lord of the rings Balrog (made with concrete and wood!) [youtube]JLclk16PtE4[/youtube] also the mouth of sauron was fun. [youtube]8FfRRpRAHI0&feature=...


4

I had a scene in a short film I did last year where I did something fun. The film is a period piece, so no modern sounds anywhere. A woman is sitting alone in a room contemplating a potion she's in the process of making that will kill her unborn child - saving it from her abusive husband. I put a clock in the room (even though there wasn't one ...


4

Here is my choice: http://www.amazon.com/Dialogue-Editing-Motion-Pictures-Invisible/dp/0240809181/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361733846&sr=8-1&keywords=dialogue+editing+for+motion+pictures http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Art-Motion-Picture-Sound/dp/0240812409/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361733899&sr=1-1&keywords=practical+art+of+...


4

Heh. Welcome to the rest of your career. :) I fall more into the "client is always right" camp. I think it's my job to speak up when I disagree and educate the clients just as you have done but at the end of the day, they're the ones who have sweat blood over this film for months, if not years on end, and the director always always gets the last word. "...


4

Talking to schizophrenics for advice how it sounds won't necessarily do you much good as we're not talking something like an LSD-trip or such here, we're talking a state that appears totally natural to the senses of the one suffering it, and this differs from person to person, as well as there are rarely dronings or similar sounds present. With rarely I mean ...


3

I like the voice of the little transformer that hacks into the airplane's network on the first movie. It's kind of an evil funny machine!


3

As said above, you want to calibrate your playback environment first. Than, in my experience, with dialogue you want to be hitting equal to about -27 DB LEQ(a) up the center channel, usually measured on a stage with a Dolby LM100. That usually results in your dialogue average meter sitting around -16 dB to -12dB with peaks hitting around -6dB, maybe as hot ...


3

Kevin, Check out this video on calibrating your studio speakers to a standard monitoring level: http://vimeo.com/22735507 Calibrate to 79dB for a home studio. If you don't have an SPL meter, you can download one on a smartphone and it will do just fine. It's might be a bit louder than you're used to. Once you're all calibrated, watch a film or show that ...


3

I find that my own suspension of disbelief tends to arise from synthesized sounds, as opposed to recontextualized field recordings. This is true of a lot of genre films (Escape from New York, Solaris, and untold hundreds of other horror and sci-fi films), but even recent films such as Terminator Salvation, where the sound design of some of the 'bots was so ...


3

If it's for dialogue I'd try and buy a secondhand MKH416. If you had to buy new right away then a K6/ME66. I honestly don't think anything below these is worth owning as they all lack sensitivity and are too noisy. If this wasn't an option I'd hire instead.


3

NOTE: this response was to the original iteration of the question. To be perfectly honest, this question rubs me the wrong way - a first actually. What rubs me the wrong way, and this is merely an observation of principal and NOT a judgement of personality/character... is that I sense a lack of gratitude, a lack of appreciation for what has been had and ...


3

The first thing is, don't make it totally gone at any point. Listen to the audio of medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy; the sound never really leaves the soundtrack completely. Fade it down and up, but not completely out. Second, use viewpoint changes in the camera editing to adjust the level of the sound; take the opportunities when the camera moves ...


3

You can also look at the David Sonnenschein book Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema. The first 25 pages gives you a really good idea of what to look for and how to listen to your script and make notes. Within the first 25 pages, Sonnenschien recommends that you take the script, whatever the version and read ...


3

You're not going to find anything worth using that you can buy for that budget. My suggestion would be to find a local shop that rents gear out and talk to them about what you'll be shooting and how. They'll be able to give you advice on what to use and how, and you'll likely get better equipment for the money you'll be spending. Granted, you won't own the ...


3

Highly relevant, you will enjoy digesting the many examples in here: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ShellShockSilence Mass Effect games also have this effect when you're "low health", a low-pass filter blurs the music until you recover:


2

Wild Strawberries The Seventh Seal Cries and Whispers by Ingmar Bergman are the best ones to study the excellent use of silence in a film. Besides these a few of my personal favourites include Peeping Tom, The Conversation, Once Upon A Time In The West and OFCOURSE Apocalypse Now! A lotta films are going through my head right now, these are a few.


2

I think people experience something like that when they hear themselves talk. Your brain knows what you're hearing is the truth, yet what you're hearing does not quite sound like match the real you (from inside the skull that is). By then the brain simply refuses to accept the artefact based on this distinction malfunctioning. I think with sound that has ...


2

I will second Ryan in his assertion that post-processing is saved for later. Anything you can fix with an edit is better served with that edit than with noise reduction. It doesn't matter how good the algorithms and processors are, noise-reduction will affect the parts you want to keep as well. Experience helps you figure out when you're reaching that point ...


2

Hi Kevin, In general movie soundtracks are not mixed to specific dB levels. Mixers mostly trust their ears and therefore they need a calibrated room. Where are you going to work on the levels of the soundtrack. Do you have access to a Dolby Mix facility? You could rent one, with assistance, and this should allow you to get the levels right in the mix. ...


2

Ingmar Bergman is probably one of the best one's who intensively used silence in hie films.


2

I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean when you say the sound effects "impact" the physiological aspects — do you mean the characters' physiology or mine? The Hurt Locker is one of my more recent favorites that emphasizes the body. The use of breath sounds to create an intimate perspective made me very nervous during the bomb diffusion scenes, as ...


2

In Blade Runner, the scene where Batty kills Tyrell ... all happens off screen, but the sound made me squirm... still does! Oh and pretty much ALL of the original 1963 The Haunting. Most of the scares are sound based, and they STILL make me tense.


2

I recently saw the film Killing Them Softly. Though the film didn't do great commercially, there are a few nicely done sound design-y moments. Eg. the scene where 2 people are beating the Ray Liotta character. Here are a few things the sound editor has said about how they did the sound for that scene. And it is really effective. The punches sound brutal and ...


2

well, one great film with BGs is 'No Country For Old Men' - lack of music in spots, BG's hold the scene and the tension runs very high, foley and BG - thats it. (thinking desert scene)


2

its unusual to ask for points. I'd take the money, hope the show does well, and move on to the next gig.


2

I agree with Internet Human's approach, I think physical baffling is the way to go. I have found success in the past by actually using the floor of my previous house. I needed to record footsteps (and a fight) from above, so I set up 4 mics in the basement facing upwards about a foot below the ceiling, and then I had fun running around upstairs, slamming my ...


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