10

Likely (and this may not be the answer you want to hear) you'll have to roll up your sleeves and build it. It's the hallmark of good BGz actually, building from the ground up. Finding some thick and dense air tones which create the right mood, a nice rumble, some HVAC tones and fluorescent buzzing, maybe OS alley drips if it's a wet scene, some OS tire ...


9

Record one long shot. Split it from the half. Put one half to the right channel and the other to left channel. Export a stereo file. This way you will get a very wide stereo image that is hard to get from a stereo field recording and your sounds in the front will be clearly distinct from ambience. Do not just transform to stereo. If you do that, you will ...


6

These may be of interest to you: http://www.stavrosound.com/blog/wordpress/2011/08/backgrounds-part-i-we-create-the-world-for-ourselves/ http://www.stavrosound.com/blog/wordpress/2011/12/backgrounds-part-ii-analyse-this-no-really-analyze-it/ There's two schools of BGz in my opinion. The school of thought where they are there for presence and smoothing ...


6

Just FIND sounds. They come from EVERYWHERE. Some are recorded outside, some in staircases, some are found in patches on synthesizers or even generated in FL Studio-like programs. You should get intimate with time-based FX like reverb and flange, competent with EQ, and experiment with things like pitch-shift, reverse, and time stretch. Be creative and ...


5

Source-->Reverb-->Compression-->EQ-->Reverb-->EQ. If that ends up being too wide you could also consider: Source-->Stereo Reverb-->Mono Reverb-->EQ-->Compression-->Mono Reverb. If the tail ends up too long, you can just put a gate with a very gentle release (500-750ms). If you do it right you should totally scare the crap out of yourself.


5

What i love about atmos is that you can build the world of the film. Ask yourself a few things: What kind of neighbourhood/building is the apartment in? Is it near an expressway? In a bad part of town? Is it a high quality, well sound proofed place? Is it cheap with poor insulation? What kind of neighbours do they have? Is it in a large complex with many ...


5

I purchased the M10. But when I was comparing the differences between the M10 and the D50, I was looking at them as solid-state 2-track recorders, not as microphones. In my mind the M10 was the winner. I saved $200 that went towards more gear in my rig that was better designed and more practical for the situations I was hoping to capture. The M10's a good ...


4

Hi, Serge Don't use or sell ambiences that contain music. It's just asking for trouble later. Find a new location without music to record in. Sometimes (usually) I have to try a couple of different locations to get away from the music that is everywhere nowadays, but it beats getting sued. Check out Paul Virostek's blog post here http://www.jetstreaming....


4

This is obviously a touchy subject, but one of those things that unlike taking a photo, a recorded sound can be totally disassociated with where and when it was recorded when taken out of physical context. So in short, I don't think there's anything to be concerned about as long as you're not purposely stalking or being a voyeur. And when you have many ...


4

Are there official, simplified, rules on (specifically) sound recording? Different laws apply on recording, depending on where you live record. In the meantime: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_recording_by_civilians and http://www.sirimo.co.uk/2009/05/14/uk-photographers-rights-v2/ , and generally treat the topic as hairy (though the photographers'...


4

Such a great opportunity! I encourage you to record the everyday hustle and bustle of life…you probably won't need to travel too far to find really interesting material. Try settling in somewhere for a couple of hours; once people forget you are standing around with a microphone they will return to their normal behaviors, much like nature recording. And ...


4

@Stavrosound totally nailed it. Our post team at Todd-AO does cover everything, BGs included, and they are treated as described for the reasons mentioned. I wasn't sure they existed either until I asked the supervising sound editor. Two additional notes: First, it's a cartoon, so our ears (and eyes) accept a ton of things which we might not in live-action. ...


4

Some links: http://www.jetstreaming.org/2011/09/30/selling-sound-effects-how-to/ How to make money with sound design. This is your competition: http://www.sounddogs.com/ http://www.soundrangers.com/ http://www.airbornesound.com/ http://designingsound.org/sfx-independence/ http://www.sound-ideas.com/ http://www.pond5.com/sound-effects/1/*.html http://www....


4

Proper stereo image is also important. One of the reasons many exterior BGs don't seem to work at first for interior locations is that they're too wide. If you pull them in quite a bit (maybe even mono all the way for some) it helps a lot. Same with distant car passes and the like.


4

Record 2 mono claps/pulses/shots, however you're generating it. Move the mic from one side of the room to the other for each, keeping each at the same distance from the source. Match up the initial claps later, save as stereo. It won't be perfect, but no-one except you will ever know ;-)


3

I've had an MKH40 for a few months now (and my MKH30 is finally arriving today). It's not the same as the 8040 that you're thinking of purchasing (doesn't have the extended frequency response), but I can say this: you will, and should, find uses for it other than just ambience recording. The MKH series is ridiculously quiet and has a great frequency response....


3

I believe you can achieve better results constructing textures from various sources than trying to create it with huge reverb. Some low freq pads, middle freq strings + low freq filter + some very high pitched sounds at very low volume etc. Everything should be equalized right. Take a texture as a composition and add elements which you need.


3

try any of the following: museums libraries govt buildings college campus hallways hospitals and medical buildings also check out organized high school events like band recitals and graduations. They're never heavily produced, and there are often large chunks of time where you can get great walla as things are setting up or tearing down.


3

Desert ambiences and open-air markets spring to mind. I have a friend who grew up there; let me ask her what else to go after. Addendum: @Rob - She says, "We went to a small city called Al-Khobar all the time to go shopping, and there's some hustle & bustle of cars, buses, people walking & talking, etc. Except for the language, though, it's not ...


3

Offstage exterior "bleedthru" sounds I believe are one of the great challenges of backgrounds - up there with wind, ocean/beach textures, and rain. In terms of how to paint it sonically so it pops, but doesn't draw unwanted attention to itself, while also not sounded like a muddy mess of frequencies with a lack of clear intent. The hallmark to doing this ...


3

Take discernable dialogue out (especially where they don't have a motivated contextual purpose), or mangle it so the words of the callout aren't intelligable. Ensures there's no distraction and that the BGz are fully M&E compatible.


3

It's not impossible to record ambiences that are near-silent, if you choose to go that route. You'll have to go out of your way to find them, probably very late at night or very early on a Sunday morning when the urban noise is at its lowest, but it can be achieved. Even with a pristine recording of a silent background, you're going to have to manufacture ...


3

From my point of view, there are often very good results when you use the best of the both worlds = simple audio manipulation + synthesis. In your case ("dark-feeling game" as you mentioned), it might be fun to work with a sound that is usually considered to be very close to actual ambient music. A combination of some dark electronic soundscapes and layered ...


3

I recommend you read these two articles for more insight on M/S recording, which, by the way, I absolutely recommend you do: http://designingsound.org/2013/10/charles-maynes-on-mid-side-recording/ http://designingsound.org/2014/02/la-underground-an-interview-with-charles-maynes/ And as as addendum, I would say that, so long as you have extra channels or ...


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