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19

1 - It seems that FFmpeg attempts to respect a common pan law (when routing a centered mono track to a stereo track, lower the mono signal by - 3 dB on each channel of the stereo track). The goal is that the perceived loudness remains coherent. EDIT As mentioned by @Mulvya, you can use the pan filter to keep input file level untouched : ffmpeg -i test.wav ...


12

Thermal Noise It's highly likely that what you are experiencing is a natural phenomeon that is entirely due to the internal electronic circuits within your amplifier. I'm not saying that external EMI doesn't come along now and then and cause noise because it does, however, what you have descibed is "thermal noise" - a constant hiss. Where does it occur? It ...


10

This is a debate that has been going on forever. And people totally over-think this and read too many posts about specs, and phase, and mono compatibility, etc. This topic seems to be as hotly debated as religion and politics. The answer to your question is actually pretty easy: Use what sounds best to you and works best in your workflow. I often use a ...


10

The simplest way to see these for yourself is to look at the metal connections on your jacks. You'll find a stereo one has one more metal ring than a mono one. The mono jack has a tip and a ring, and where that ring is overlaps two of the stereo jack's rings, so plugging a stereo jack into a mono plug effectively shorts your right channel to ground at the ...


8

You can without any concerns plug a stereo cable into an unbalanced mono jack; as long as you only send mono signals (i.e. L and R channels equal) it will work just fine, except for the usually -3 dB pan law and possible short-cicuiting of the ring connector; the latter is however unlikely and not harmful for line connections. (It can be harmful for e.g. ...


7

Hi This will only cause phase problems if it's routed to the same output as the stereo-pair. Except this won't be a stereo pair. Recording vocals in stereo is pointless, small movements between mics are translated as large movements between speakers. (MS is or Binaural works though) Usually one mic is either a) fail-safe b) different gain or both. The third ...


7

First off, your understanding of the perception of directionality is a little flawed. Yes, "Interaural Time Difference" (ITD) affects our ability to localize, but so does "Interaural Level Difference" (ILD). Our brain makes use of both, because each lose effectiveness outside of certain frequency ranges. We need both mechanisms to localize across the ...


6

My personal take on it is that usually for stems the channel denomination should equal your other stems, or at least be LCR or 5.0. In the case of working in a stereo environment, I'd recommend going with stereo. For one, dialogue does have to be panned sometimes - whether for creative purposes, or in rare cases to fix a story issue that's hard to see ...


5

Sennheiser MKH 40 Sennheiser MKH 30 Rycote suspension w/ pistol grip Rycote Stereo Windshield size AE Rycote Stereo Windjammer Rycote Stereo Connbox Rycote MS stereo mic clips Boom pole of your choice The only alternative I'd consider is a Schoeps MS rig, but $4k will barely cover the capsules and power supplies. But equally sweet, for different reasons. ...


5

You can do a basic implementation manually in any daw: Copy the track Pan both tracks left and right respectively and symmetrically The dry channel should be around 18dB louder than the Haas channel Add a time delay of 13ms-~50ms to 'Haas' channel' Be careful how much Haas you use, it affects the tonality of the track when summed to mono. If you have ...


5

You can use the amerge and pan filters in ffmpeg to combine two mono streams into one stereo output: ffmpeg -i input -filter_complex "[0:3] [0:4] amerge,pan=stereo:c0=c0:c1=c1" -c:v copy -c:a pcm_s16le output or using -ac instead of pan: ffmpeg -i input -filter_complex "[0:3] [0:4] amerge" -c:v copy -c:a pcm_s16le -ac 2 output [0:3] and [0:4] refer to ...


5

With headphones you will get complete separation of left and right channels. You will only hear the left channel in the left ear and the right channel in the right ear, assuming you don't listen at insane volumes or put the headphones on backwards :) With speakers, aside from the reverb and echos in the room mentioned by @Eugene, you will still hear at ...


4

I guess is not done often because mono compatibility concerns. Delay introduces all sort of phase issues. Mono is important in broadcast.


4

I recommend reading this article before making your decision. A lot of useful info about AB mic placement etc.. I think you'd be fine with 40cm unless you want a wide AB image from a pair of omnis. I'd also consider the Grace Design Spacebar as well as the Rycote.


4

While I agree with @Stavrosound, if you're talking tv it depends on what your deliverables sheet dictates. Different networks, even different departments in the same network, request different formats of stems as final deliverables. If you're using a single master template for all your work, I'd bus my dialog in stereo (or lcr) for panning, verb, delay, ...


4

For the most part, with centered mixes, there is very little difference between speakers and headphones other than the impact of the acoustics of the room versus the sterile headphone environment. When you get in to stereo panning, however, an interesting thing happens. In a room, both ears hear sound from both speakers, so a sound coming only from the ...


4

ReaSurround in Reaper is pretty good, after reading your question I did find this post in the Reaper forums that does pretty much exactly what you want. http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=133619 Check out the demo file he created, it definitely simulates that soundstage well. I started playing around with it a bit, and it's not super intuitive, ...


4

I just came up with a rule of thumb. I don't know if it is is really any good or not, but maybe worth considering. If you are taking things away (cleanup) better to do it in mono. If you are adding things, (sweetening such as reverb) better to do it in stereo.


4

You have the wrong adapter. You have a signal splitter rather an a dual mono to stereo converter. 3.5mm and 6.5mm jacks have multiple possible configurations of the connector. The most common are TS (tip/sleeve), TRS (tip/ring/sleeve) and TRRS (tip/ring/ring/sleeve). Each of these serves a different purpose. In all cases, one portion is the ground, ...


3

A lot of people are mentioning cost and overlooking the concept of aesthetic choice (props to Brendan Rehill for mentioning it). Multichannel surround isn't necessarily the best choice for all theatrically distributed films. Documentaries are a prime example. Yes, you can mix a documentary in surround (and some/many do), but few suffer aesthetically in 2 (or ...


3

Some conceptual reasons have been expressed by Walter Murch and Michel Chion: mono/stereo centre the viewer's focus on the screen and diegetic world, further supporting the suspension of disbelief. Having sounds emanating from the physical theatre space can draw the audience's attention the fact that they are in a cinema and divides their attention between ...


3

I've had an MKH40 for a few months now (and my MKH30 is finally arriving today). It's not the same as the 8040 that you're thinking of purchasing (doesn't have the extended frequency response), but I can say this: you will, and should, find uses for it other than just ambience recording. The MKH series is ridiculously quiet and has a great frequency response....


3

Well one method is to invert the phase of one channel of the stereo signal. It's a trick long used in moviemaking. When the sound has phase correlation and definite stereo image ("phantom"), we can localize it by panorama on stereo speaker setup. If you rotate the phase of left or right channel, a listener can't localize it in front hemisphere of him, thus ...


3

Phase is one of those things that is a lot more complex in reality than it first seems from the theory. Sound waves are transmitted through oscillating air pressure. Electronically, it is captured as a signal that maps the pressure changes to changes in electrical voltage. If you had a fixed frequency wave, it would look like a sine wave going up and down ...


3

The easiest thing to do would be to turn your two stereo recordings into two mono recordings. You might be able to do this by summing your left and right channel, but it is safer to pick either the left channel or the right channel and use that. This is because you might have phase cancellation when summing the two channels to mono. Now that you have gotten ...


3

It's all about listeners' beliefs about what staying true to artistic integrity means. If a record was recorded mono (mostly very old recordings), and then re-mixed or re-mastered to be stereo, it means that someone other than the original artist or engineer has altered the source material. This concept is contrary to some people's desire for the original ...


3

You have a few options, 1) you can buy a 1/8 or 1/4 inch headphone jack and short the L R connections together since (in an unbalanced situation (most regular headphones)) they share a common ground. Keep in mind you will be driving twice the load from the same source which will effect the output. 2) You can buy a headphone amplifier that has a mono ...


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