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21

1 - It seems that FFmpeg attempts to respect a common pan law (when routing a centered mono track to a stereo track, lower the mono signal by - 3 dB on each channel of the stereo track). The goal is that the perceived loudness remains coherent. EDIT As mentioned by @Mulvya, you can use the pan filter to keep input file level untouched : ffmpeg -i test.wav ...


12

Thermal Noise It's highly likely that what you are experiencing is a natural phenomeon that is entirely due to the internal electronic circuits within your amplifier. I'm not saying that external EMI doesn't come along now and then and cause noise because it does, however, what you have descibed is "thermal noise" - a constant hiss. Where does it occur? It ...


4

Well one method is to invert the phase of one channel of the stereo signal. It's a trick long used in moviemaking. When the sound has phase correlation and definite stereo image ("phantom"), we can localize it by panorama on stereo speaker setup. If you rotate the phase of left or right channel, a listener can't localize it in front hemisphere of him, thus ...


4

ReaSurround in Reaper is pretty good, after reading your question I did find this post in the Reaper forums that does pretty much exactly what you want. http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=133619 Check out the demo file he created, it definitely simulates that soundstage well. I started playing around with it a bit, and it's not super intuitive, ...


4

I just came up with a rule of thumb. I don't know if it is is really any good or not, but maybe worth considering. If you are taking things away (cleanup) better to do it in mono. If you are adding things, (sweetening such as reverb) better to do it in stereo.


4

You have the wrong adapter. You have a signal splitter rather an a dual mono to stereo converter. 3.5mm and 6.5mm jacks have multiple possible configurations of the connector. The most common are TS (tip/sleeve), TRS (tip/ring/sleeve) and TRRS (tip/ring/ring/sleeve). Each of these serves a different purpose. In all cases, one portion is the ground, ...


3

There are two answers to your question. Simple answer has been given by ObscureRobot here. I only add to make sure your source already completely summed to mono, otherwise the right channel will be dropped, as explained below. Alternative answer: The right channel on all five stereo jacks are connected to literally nothing (a waste if you ask me), but ...


3

It's all about listeners' beliefs about what staying true to artistic integrity means. If a record was recorded mono (mostly very old recordings), and then re-mixed or re-mastered to be stereo, it means that someone other than the original artist or engineer has altered the source material. This concept is contrary to some people's desire for the original ...


3

The answer is MS, or Mid-side. There are 2 types of "ambiance" situations that are very different. The first is dialogue recording with mono mics. Mono ambiances from those mics are needed to patch up issues and replace the talent mics at certain parts to cover other sounds. That is a critical function of mono sounds, but those are not technically field ...


3

You have a few options, 1) you can buy a 1/8 or 1/4 inch headphone jack and short the L R connections together since (in an unbalanced situation (most regular headphones)) they share a common ground. Keep in mind you will be driving twice the load from the same source which will effect the output. 2) You can buy a headphone amplifier that has a mono ...


3

Stereo cables aren't special in any sense that would stop them from operating as independent halves. A common ground might cause some issues if you have two sources with different earth grounds, but in general this shouldn't be a problem.


3

I've finally sorted this issue out. It turned out I don't need to have a headphone amp for this and all I really have to use is some cables and adapters. The connection I have now is this: TRS plug Y-adapter to dual TRS socket (duplicates the mono signal to two mono signals) 2xTS - TRS cable (TS plugged to TRS sockets, TRS plugged to CD/MP3 in of POD ...


3

You need a 2 mono to 1 stereo 3.5 adapter. (As it seems the input of the Zoom H1 is a 3.5 mm female jack). This is not a Y combiner. That is a cable with 2 female mono 3.5 mm jack to 1 male stereo 3.5 jack. For example :


3

Well, as you've noticed yourself, it will normally work. This is because both channel outputs should be expected to have the same output impedance, so wiring them parallel effectively creates an averaging circuit. However, this is not really an intended mode of operation. The output impedance of this combined output will be half the individual impedance, ...


3

When I was studying computer music at Eastman back in the late '90's, this is something that was being actively developed by the composing community. The best effects rely on understanding psychoacoustics. My teacher Alan Schindler was writing code along these lines in CSound, a free programming language developed at MIT, which is nice because it is ...


3

multiple channels doesn't mean that its stereo. It could be Dual Mono where the 2 channels have no correlation to each other or it could be a mono track but taking up 2 channels for "stereo" playback. A true stereo sound will have to be 2 channels.


3

Take a look at the bottom of the Channel Strip section. Here you will find a Format button that shows if the track is stereo or mono (there is a two-circle icon indicating it is stereo): or Click-hold the button and select either Left or Right channel: Additional details in the manual around page 264-265. Note that if you want to physically change the ...


3

As you specify using a 'stereo linked compressor', neither the timing relation or the level differences between both channels should be modified. Therefore, the stereo width should be unaffected. That's what 'stereo linked compressors' are made for. Nevertheless, there could be unexpected perceptive differences, especially if you're hitting hard into the ...


3

You could have a look into processing the recordings with the help of a binaural panning tool such as the one included in Logic. You would import the two channels of your audio files as two seperate mono tracks into the DAW and process each of them with the binaural panner. Using Psypan by Auburn Sounds in combination with Audacity would be a free ...


3

This is often the case where you have a single microphone feeding two channels of input. The reason for this is that it reduces the risk of a single channel of audio going to air as part of a stereo pair, resulting in left (or right) channel only - sound. If an editor, under the pump, forgets to pan a single channel of audio in the edit correctly, you will ...


2

If you assign the output of your stereo tracks to a mono bus, set the input of a mono track to the bus and then record to the mono track, you will get a stereo to mono downmix. However, you should be careful to monitor the mono track, as it's very possible that the combination of the L and R channels will cause phasing. I'd recommend using a single channel ...


2

I don't believe there is a way to do what you are looking for mostly because there isn't much of a practical reason for it. Pretty much any reasonably modern connection is going to handle streaming audio without buffering, so running multiple bitrates and trying to switch between them on the fly shouldn't be necessary. Also, changing from stereo to mono as ...


2

Use any decent quality tape deck. Stereo recording tape decks are quite common.


2

The hissing on my stereo was simply an extension cord wrapped round a speaker cable. It had been used for Christmas lights. When I removed the extension cord the hissing was gone. I tried the turntable, radio and CD player. Only the CD player sounded bad, the turntable and radio sound great. The same CD disc sounds great on the laptop when hooked up to the ...


2

Whilst the musician would hear the vibes in stereo, in a stage situation, the audience almost certainly is going to hear them in mono, as they are much further away from the vibes. I would mix a recording from the audience's point of view (or point of hearing). So - if the vibes is the only instrument, then it should be mixed in stereo (but not hard left/...


2

For me this would be all about context. In a solo recording you may want to give some extra stereo width to this kind of instrument, although, in my humble opinion, its very easy to overdo it. For example panning the two mics hard left and hard right is going to give a wide spread but may leave you with a hollow centre. Solidity of the centre in the stereo ...


2

As such, I would never mix effects on the sides but nothing in center, and I normally place most effects, and here I'm talking about straight in-frame effects, pretty much centered, with only reverbations in the sides and rear. Unless it's panned. Then it's still mono plus acoustics, but panned. On certain rather big things though, like close ups to trains, ...


2

I haven't used Adobe Audition before, but I suppose, that you used automation. You should be able to copy automation from one track to another. Second option could be duplicate the track (with automation) and replace audio.


2

Sound quality is probably the first reason. A balanced audio signal only works when the interference/noise is the same on both signals. After inverting the sound signal, the noises that were identical on both signals will only be canceled out. So if there is any interference on the signal, make it happen that they are the same on both cables. When using a ...


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