7

It's not the ear can can differentiate a voice from background, it's the brain. It can use the minute differences in timing that a sound arrives at each ear (known as the Haas or Precedence Effect) to precisely place a sound source in space, & we are so attuned to picking out conversation that a human voice is easily differentiated & understood. ...


5

Let me start by addressing the lack of microphones that can do this. There isn't one. We have specialized highly directional microphones that can pick up very specific points at fairly long distances, however they require being very carefully aimed. The area that a microphone picks up sound from is called the pickup pattern. Most consumer mics (and many ...


4

The general rule is getting the boom as close as possible to the actors mouths WITHOUT getting the mic in the frame! Can't see many directors having the attitude of "it's ok we'll fix THAT in post". Definitely not an attitude i would think a boom op would have on set, unless he/she wanted a very short career in sound...


4

As I recall, Richard King used lavs (or maybe contact mics?) mounted on the guns the get an interesting POV for Inception when recording with John Fasal and Eric Potter. Than again, they were recording more of the usual suspects (Glock, SIG-Sauer, Colt, etc) and it likely captured the mechanics of shell ejects. I personally haven't worked with/recording ...


4

Sounds like fun. If you can get your hands on/rent a Nagra, the sound of overdriving the tape will bring something special to the party. It's a bit of a pain to set up and run, but it squashes the dynamics of a gun in a really nice/meaty way. Much like recording a drumset on a 2 inch Studer. I recently did a gun shoot and put an AKG D112 dynamic near the ...


4

Honestly, I just use whatever I have - even if all I have is mono. Never let the equipment get in the way of a good roomtone (or for that matter, ambience). I certainly agree with @Guido that high quality gear is best suited for roomtone to obtain the most robust S/N, but beyond that, I'm pretty loose about this type of recording. Roomtone is one of those ...


4

Shotguns help, but they do not 100% isolate anything. The main way to "isolate" a sound in the field is with distance. You want to get as far away from undesired noises and as close to desired noises as possible. The difference with a shotgun is that when you aim it correctly, it gives you more flexibility on the distance, but it doesn't completely isolate ...


3

lavs are always fun, so i'll second that. I'd also try some pzm mics for low end and amb. Also, I'm very interested in seeing how ribbon mics fare in weaponfire situations. (its a common misconception that high spls damage ribbons - in fact its wind turbulence that does.) I think a nice ribbon blumeline setup could potentially yield some really nice stuff....


3

Before you make all of these decisions about the signal chain, think about what made 50s-60s rocknroll and pop music sound the way it did—it's so much more than just the mics and preamps. Do some reading about the sessions themselves, the equipment available, and the limitations that studios and bands faced in terms of gear and time. The musical groups ...


3

This is a very music recording orientated question, so you might fare better asking on Gearslutz. I'll offer my thoughts anyway. Your equipment set up sounds excellent, BUT I think you'll find it very hard work to get a 50s/60s sound with such modern mics, mic technique (you mention M/S), mic pres, and instruments and amps. Your whole production seems ...


3

Who says the mic always has to be on a boom? On medium shots, I've hidden mics in planters, taped them onto the shoulder of actors facing the camera to pick up someone speaking behind them, mounted an MK41 on the front of someone who's back is to the camera to pick up the main character's lines who is speaking to him, hidden them in hats, placed them behind ...


3

The SM57 in the bridge can work. A good quality capsule condenser (like a LAV) clipped to the bridge can also work well. Sure, it isn't ideal, but I haven't seen anything better for loud live environments.


3

It's not entirely clear what setup you're talking about, but I'll discuss both options. The mics are basically at the same spot, just offset a bit to aim in directly opposite directions.This is essentially an XY pattern, with an extremely wide angle. The setup will thus work a lot like XY: quite reliable phase for mono compatibility, stereo field only from ...


3

The cardioid pattern is a 3D pattern and is taken along the front direction of the mic. This video explains the concept pretty well - The internal structure of the microphone shows that the condenser surface is pointed in a specific direction.


2

Maybe some binaural mics? Perhaps a pair in the ears of the armorer as they're firing like some DPA 4060's? ;)


2

First thing that crosses my mind - did you check if your phantom power is on? Second - did you try another cable? Third - check if input was mistakenly set to line input instead of mic


2

Take omnidirectional microphones! In contrast do cardioids, omnidirectional microphones captures much more low end. This gives you the andvantage that your room tones will also have something in the lows instead of cardiodid records. Cardioid microphones cut's bass frequencies which is good for voice and music. For rooms, it makes it thin. In post ...


2

Yes, regretfully the sound will suffer tremendously from this, which only makes it usable for telephoning and such. There are, however, as far as I know variants of this technique. Schoeps has a digital version of the CMIT-mic that allegedly can do just this, but for a single sound-source. I haven't tried it out myself, so I can't really say how well it ...


2

If it sounds good, do it. But listen back in mono to check there aren't any phase issues.


2

He was most likely worried about phasing issues, as I'm assuming you weren't doing a stereo split for a dual mic piano setup. Basically, when you have them in the center pointed out, one mic primarily picks up the lower registers and the other primarily picks up the higher registers so you don't have to worry much about phase when they are combined. If ...


2

You could use: a digital mix console, such as: Alesis MultiMix 8/16 USB, a big audio interface, such as: Presonus AudioBox 1818VSL USB, Tascam US-16x8, Focusrite Scarlett 18i8


2

You will need a wireless lav mic. Two manufacturers of such systems at entry level prices (as wireless can be very expensive) are Sennheiser and Shure (there are other manufacturers, of course). Now, one issue is to find the way to hide the mic under your Mark Twain clothes. You might need some training, find appropriate accessories (like gaffer tape or ...


2

I haven't tested the Beyerdynamic mic (and still haven't run into anyone using Beyerdynamic mics here in Norway), but the P170 sounds okay for most applications I've used it for (mostly as overheads for various instruments) As Dalv writes, using multiple mics in multiple locations are the best option. You should also attempt to get some distance from the ...


2

First of all reverb in an empty room is very long , this changes when some stuff gets it. What u'll need is a standing library with books , a cozy soft couch and some shelves here & there with stuff to help scatter the sound. This is give or take what any office already has and helps a lot. But for any type of recording you should spend those 100$ to ...


2

As it will not be seen, you have the freedom to attach it to the actor's head or face, rather than any clothing/costume. You could use a boom version, over the ear & just to the side of the mouth, for greatest SNR. Otherwise, down through the hair & attach to the forehead, similar to a standard hairline install, but tweaked even closer because of ...


2

This pretty much comes down to microphone polar patterns, you can read more about it here: Polar Patterns. Also, condenser microphones are more sensitive than dynamic microphones. You can read more about it here: Dynamic vs Condenser. Your lavalier microphone is likely a condenser. A dynamic microphone with a cardioid pickup pattern in a configuration ...


1

I like quad dual ORTF or otherwise spaced pair. Wiiide tonez. :)


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