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8

Threshold is the point set for when the compressor actually starts compressing once the volume of the program or track reaches above that level. Note that it's a static volume, so if you have a voice or instrument that is all over the place due to levels, you might want to do a pre-leveling with a fader/volume automation to even it out so it's always hitting ...


8

I like to take some interesting ambiences and pass them through a short doppler effect. You can generate a lot of varied material rather quickly and have precise control over the length. It works great with natural elements such as wind but I've had some surprisingly good results with machinery, there is quite a large opportunity for experimentation with ...


7

Personally, I stopped any activities in any way related to normalizing a long time ago. How I record sounds is how they go into my library. I don't mess with the dynamics, and I don't gain them up (unless I'm actually designing a sound for a specific use). I don't need every single sound peaking out at -.3 dBFS with an RMS of -10 dBFS. I'm never going to put ...


7

You could use sox sox infile outfile gain −n −3 will normalise the level to -3 dB relative to full scale deflection.


7

There are 5 stages/phases in a Album production: Recording > Editing > Mixing > Mastering > Printing. It's worth naming "Pre-production", which is before the 5 steps and can be very important to make things go better. Pre-production can be a wide variety of things. All from making the music arrangements, defining artist identity, vision, and intention; to ...


7

In Audacity, you can approach this in at least two ways, depending on the nature of the bit you want to silence and the surrounding material. The simple way is to highlight the section of the track / channel and select "Generate... Silence" from the menu. The suggested duration will be the length of your selection. This is a harsh edit, and very likely ...


6

That's still an EQ, you just cut the bands to -infinity. More specifically, you would want to use a shelf EQ if you have it. Also sometimes called high pass and low pass filters.


6

Audacity is a great tool for this kind of work. You might be able to make a slightly better sound using a sampler that can crossfade across different sounds for different pitches, but I'm not sure if the result would be worth the extra effort. It sounds to me like the problem with your "current best" is that you either aren't looking for zero crossings when ...


6

When you import a lossy audio file into editing software, that file is decoded into an audio waveform. This is a "lossless" waveform in that it's not stored in a compressed format, but it's not the same as the original waveform that your lossy file was approximating. So there are already three concepts involved: The original waveform, which is to say, the ...


5

For reel breaks (assuming picture dept didn't do an improper break mid-scene and/or during a line), I do an Equal Gain 2-frame fade, one frame on either side of the LFOA, same as when I do hard cuts from scene to scene - 2 frame fades. I do the same at the top of the reel. I don't know all the details of this, but sometimes after the mix, the stage creates ...


5

I would say that you're overlooking a vital aspect of compression...there's nothing requiring you to use make up gain. Compessors can be used very effectively to control sustained amplitude increases or transient peaks. Your argument about bringing up the noise floor is a little mistaken as well. If you need to bring up the volume of a passage (whether by ...


5

Ah, the dreaded re-conform. There'a a variety ways to do this, on a variety of budget levels and time turn around situations. Software packages out there like Virtual Katy and Conformalizer work by comparing EDLs or working with Change Notes. While they can work very well as I've heard, I wouldn't be too surprised if you still have to massage all the ...


5

What you need is a sequencer that can also handle audio data, or an audio suite that also handles sequencing. Collectively, these programs are known as Digital Audio Workstations, commonly abbreviated DAWs. While the term "DAW" technically refers only to audio editing (waveforms), it's very common for a DAW to also support MIDI sequencing, or to be more of a ...


5

Note that SyxEx data is, by its very nature, vendor specific. Supporting detailed SysEx editing would require custom work for each MIDI synth ever made. EMagic's Sounddriver did this, but was discontinued shortly after Apple bought EMagic. You can accomplish a lot of MIDI and SysEx manipulation with Logic's environment, though it is awkward, poorly ...


5

For something like an ongoing vocal recording the assumption would be that the settings and environment would be the same each time. This isn't very technical but it would be the first thing I would ask - that they use a standard config. If you are trying to correct after the fact, a compressor can help you bring levels up to a standard. Or if you have ...


5

The separation of instruments from a mix is something that seems easy to us. Humans can concentrate, for example, on a specific instrument being played in an orchestra. We can do this because we are very good at grouping harmonics into a 'tone', and associating characteristic timbre with an instrument. We are also good at filling in what isn't there with ...


5

Quick answer - No I haven't heard of any but I've heard about research being done on the field. The greatest theoretical problem with de-mixing is knowing what to subtract. When we mix, we add A and B which are both known signals. But when we try to do the opposite, we need to know in advance what B is. This would render the process useless in most cases ...


4

I agree with @Shaun on this. I think the confidence to not normalize or alter gain comes with experience. My big a-ha came as I built my own library of ambiences: Adjusting gain in post would leave me with just as many variances in background noise and mic self-noise as my wildly varying input gain on my mic pre's in the field between outings, perhaps more....


4

While I haven't specifically done Audiobook editing, I have edited VO and Narration (close cousins to Audiobook). And the closest comparison I can draw is dialogue editorial. here's a post which may help: Looking for some help on dialogue editing? First, I respectfully disagree with George on the decision to go away from a NLE like ProTools. I can't ...


4

The human voice is one of the most versatile synthesizers going and I've recorded many whooshes that can be used as base sounds and then layered with other sound textures.


4

Your simplest option may just be to find the same words spoken by the same individual in an earlier part of the interview and splice them in. It will sound much closer to the correct speech than an artificially generated sample. This issue is the main reason why you don't cut until well after the end of the interview or scene.


4

There is no such tool that I'm aware of and I'm not even sure what exactly the output of such a tool would look like. What is available, however, is the ability to use the integration between Adobe applications to work on the audio track in Premiere directly in Audition so that you shouldn't have to manage it yourself like this. In fact, I believe it may ...


4

It kinda matters what order you put them in but everyone has a different order that they like and then sometimes you adjust for issues. Most Channel strips let you change the order of at least some of the modules. I tend to default to EQ/DYN/De-es/multiband but everyone is different. Sometimes you might need 2 of certain processes, 1 to fix an issue, ...


4

I can see two reasons why you'd use a gate while recording instead of in editing : 1. You're broadcasting live. 2. You're using outboard equipment. A gate should, generally, be first in your audio chain but in your case you might want to put it after your noise reduction. You never want to put it after the compressor! If you do it in editing you have ...


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