13

Snagged from Beyer-Dynamics website: The impedance is determined by the voice coil (dynamic headphones), which is a winded copper wire (coated to avoid a short-circuit). This copper wire is available in nearly every length, but not in every gauge (thickness) and a thicker wire has less resistance than a thin wire ("less fits through"). The ...


5

"Power" isn't really the issue. Certainly, most interfaces can offer enough wattage to cause ear damage, theoretically. However, the actual power is not determined by the HP-output alone, but by the headphones' own impedance as well: if it's substantially larger than the output impedance, then P = U2 / Z where U is the (RMS) output voltage of the ...


4

An amplifier works by multiplying the voltage of your audio source(CD, TV, etc...). When this voltage is applied to a load, such as a pair of headphones, then a current runs though the pair of headphones in relation to V=IZ where Z is the impedance. An ideal amp would maintain the exact same voltage regardless if the load is connected or not. However ...


3

There are some characteristics for low and high impedance headphones - but these are not to be taken as universal truths (you'll find excellent sounding low impedance headphones and horrible sounding high impedance headphones and visa versa). However let us generalize a few characteristics: High Impedance (above 100 ohms) Typically has more windings in ...


3

Line in is an audio input normally around 150mv line sensitivity and can be used for devices such as tape players,cd players,mp3 players etc. It cannot be used as a microphone input as you would hardly hear it, a microphone input needs to see an input sensitivity of around -5 mv input,as cd players and mp3 players already have an output of around 100+mVolts ...


3

According to a review by Ken Rockwell on the DT 880, the only real difference between the 32, 250 and 600 ohm versions was how loud you are able to play them. http://kenrockwell.com/audio/beyer/dt-880.htm He even plugged in the 600 ohm version to an iPod and said it got plenty loud but it was practically at max volume.There is no reason to think that the ...


3

Since your interface has an instrument input and the stomp boxes are designed to work with an instrument line, I would hazard that the best quality results will likely result from going in to the instrument input. The trick will be to get the output from the audio interface down to the correct impedance for the pedals which may require a significant amount ...


2

Forget about headphone impedances; as you assume they're primarily an indicator for the loudness, but you can't conclude anything about the sound from them. In particular, the higher the headphone impedance the lower the influence on the sound. Actually, the sound of any headphones is mainly governed by their mechanical construction. I personally have never ...


2

It depends on the system that is driving them. Some gear (particularly consumer gear) will start distorting more as it nears it's maximum power output. On the one hand, you are further away from the noise floor, which means cleaner quiet parts, but on the other hand, if you have to push it so hard that it starts to distort the signal itself, then any gain ...


2

As far as audio goes, any headphones will work. If you intend to use a headset with a built-in mic, you'll have to be sure it is set up with the OMTP TRRS layout. See below... source Incidentally, there are also adapters (here's an example on amazon) to swap the ground/mic ring/sleeve layout. Of course, if you're handy at it, you could also swap the ...


2

First off, notice another label on the back of the amp: "Jacks paralleled". This means that both of the output jacks carry the same signal; there are two of them for the sole purpose of allowing you to plug in two cabinets without needing a splitter, or having a "daisy-chain" jack on the cabinets. This is a single-channel amp, as most guitar amplifiers are; ...


2

Beyer Dynamic DT 770 Pro 32 ohm ? also worth exploring: Sony 7510 24 ohm Re "working it out": Read this and this. At same sensitivity ("The sensitivity rating is usually for 1 milliwatt power input to the phones and a corresponding sound pressure level (SPL) output (usually 102 to 106 dB SPL output for moderate to high sensitivity rated phones)." source):...


2

The lower speaker impedance would cause a larger demand from the amp, but that's not a huge mismatch, and not likely to damage anything if you stay in normal bounds. No one can guarantee anything, but this seems fairly safe to me. Remember too that speaker impedance is a nominal value and will vary a lot over the range of frequencies. If you can get an ...


2

Speaking as an electronics engineer, the general rule (below radio frequencies), when designing amplifiers and various audio interfaces is try and make outputs low impedance and inputs high impedance. If you connect a high output impedance to a low input impedance you get signal loss and when restoring that signal loss (with gain) you'll amplify the noise ...


2

It depends a lot on the kind of equipment. Sometimes equipment is designed to have a low impedance output and be connected to a much higher impedance input. Other times equipment is designed so that the output and input impedances are to be matched as closely as possible. The possible consequences are wide-ranging. Anything from loss of signal strength to ...


2

That the channel is "stereo" is really not important as long as you use the L/mono input. But there are other things to consider: The load impedance (mixer input impedance) should be higher than the source/output impedance (mic/strument). The usual rule-of-thumb is a 1:10 impedance ratio between instrument/mic and preamp. A typical passive bass impedance ...


2

Computer microphone inputs, both the built-in kind and the external USB kind, are designed to be used with relatively high-output electret condenser microphones. But that dynamic mic (Shure SV100) is rather low-level output and will not work very well with "computer type" microphone inputs of any kind, internal or external. Your experiment vividly ...


1

It's possible, but requires expertise. You need the specifications for all of the speaker components. Then you can build a passive filter that combines a woofer and tweeter, plus a new enclosure that's tuned to the frequency response of the components you've chosen. It's much easier to replace the blown components with identical new ones. Attaching a ...


1

There are a few things that are causing problems for you here. Mainly that your source is designed to drive a set of headphones and your load (sound card) is designed to accept an electret microphone at its input. I haven't been able to get the headphone output to work using simple headphones through a 1/4" to 3.5mm adapter First confirm that your ...


1

1. "Can I feed DI box output into the line inputs in my mixer?" Your typical Behringer mixer has a gain range of -10 to +40 dB with the line in, but this varies from mixer to mixer (look it up in the specs section of the manual). The signal level from the DI box greatly depends on what you connect to it and the DI box model. But generally you get ranges ...


1

Your ground connection is missing from the headphones. Check the continuity from each ear-piece to the ground connection which is the Sleeve on your 3-pin stereo plug. You should be able to do this with any cheap multimeter. The reason you can still hear stuff is because there is a link between the grounds at the earpiece level, just not between the ...


1

Your question is referring to professional headphones so I'll try to answer in that context. High impedance headphones typically have lower distortion due to the high ratio of the input impedance vs output impedance, otherwise known as the damping factor. Here is a link on that topic. http://benchmarkmedia.com/blogs/news/11653109-the-0-ohm-headphone-...


1

This is explained in the equation DF=Zload/Zsource. With a constant Zsource, an increased Zload results in an increased DF. If you read the article carefully, the low output impedance referred to is actually the output impedance of the amplifier, which in this equation is Zsource. So, if you have a low Zsource, this would lead to a higher DF value.


1

Sony MDR-7506/V6's have served me, and many others, well for many years in this configuration.


1

What are you comparing this low output on the headphone amplifier to? I realize that you say these K240's work fine on your laptop, but are you monitoring the same ProTools output on your laptop that you're trying to run through the MBox Mini? Have you eliminated everything else as the issue? Do you use the 1/4" monitor outputs on the back of the MBox Mini? ...


1

I did some reading, and I see several complaints that the headphone output on the Mbox mini is very weak. Depending on the version, 60mW or 20 mW into 32 Ohm. The Presonus Firebox, by comparison, can go ridiculously loud, and has 150 mW into 60 Ohm. An iPhone has 30 mW per channel. Getting low impedance versions of headphones is one way to get louder output,...


1

You can't just measure the DC resistance, that's not relevant at all. The easiest way to measure some impedance is to send a standard 50 / 60 Hz sine signal to the speaker (e.g. produced by dangling an unshielded wire from the amplifier input1 and turning up the volume), and then measure both AC voltage parallel to the speaker and AC current in series, ...


1

Size isn't all that matters in determining how much SPL will be put out. How far the diaphragm can move and with what force the magnets can move also matters. If you have a giant diaphragm and it only moves a small distance then it is not going to be nearly as loud as if a similar diaphragm is moving much further and displacing more air (stronger pressure ...


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