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19

1 - It seems that FFmpeg attempts to respect a common pan law (when routing a centered mono track to a stereo track, lower the mono signal by - 3 dB on each channel of the stereo track). The goal is that the perceived loudness remains coherent. EDIT As mentioned by @Mulvya, you can use the pan filter to keep input file level untouched : ffmpeg -i test.wav ...


10

The simplest way to see these for yourself is to look at the metal connections on your jacks. You'll find a stereo one has one more metal ring than a mono one. The mono jack has a tip and a ring, and where that ring is overlaps two of the stereo jack's rings, so plugging a stereo jack into a mono plug effectively shorts your right channel to ground at the ...


8

Download Audacity here. Also download the LAME MP3 library here Install Audacity on your system. Install the LAME MP3 library. Open Audacity Click on File > Open... and select the mp3 file in question Click on Track > Stereo track to Mono Click on File > Export. Choose "MP3 Files" as Format on the dropdown menu and click save. Note 1: If you want to save ...


8

You can without any concerns plug a stereo cable into an unbalanced mono jack; as long as you only send mono signals (i.e. L and R channels equal) it will work just fine, except for the usually -3 dB pan law and possible short-cicuiting of the ring connector; the latter is however unlikely and not harmful for line connections. (It can be harmful for e.g. ...


6

My personal take on it is that usually for stems the channel denomination should equal your other stems, or at least be LCR or 5.0. In the case of working in a stereo environment, I'd recommend going with stereo. For one, dialogue does have to be panned sometimes - whether for creative purposes, or in rare cases to fix a story issue that's hard to see ...


4

While I agree with @Stavrosound, if you're talking tv it depends on what your deliverables sheet dictates. Different networks, even different departments in the same network, request different formats of stems as final deliverables. If you're using a single master template for all your work, I'd bus my dialog in stereo (or lcr) for panning, verb, delay, ...


4

I just came up with a rule of thumb. I don't know if it is is really any good or not, but maybe worth considering. If you are taking things away (cleanup) better to do it in mono. If you are adding things, (sweetening such as reverb) better to do it in stereo.


4

You have the wrong adapter. You have a signal splitter rather an a dual mono to stereo converter. 3.5mm and 6.5mm jacks have multiple possible configurations of the connector. The most common are TS (tip/sleeve), TRS (tip/ring/sleeve) and TRRS (tip/ring/ring/sleeve). Each of these serves a different purpose. In all cases, one portion is the ground, ...


3

I've finally sorted this issue out. It turned out I don't need to have a headphone amp for this and all I really have to use is some cables and adapters. The connection I have now is this: TRS plug Y-adapter to dual TRS socket (duplicates the mono signal to two mono signals) 2xTS - TRS cable (TS plugged to TRS sockets, TRS plugged to CD/MP3 in of POD ...


3

Stereo cables aren't special in any sense that would stop them from operating as independent halves. A common ground might cause some issues if you have two sources with different earth grounds, but in general this shouldn't be a problem.


3

You have a few options, 1) you can buy a 1/8 or 1/4 inch headphone jack and short the L R connections together since (in an unbalanced situation (most regular headphones)) they share a common ground. Keep in mind you will be driving twice the load from the same source which will effect the output. 2) You can buy a headphone amplifier that has a mono ...


3

It's all about listeners' beliefs about what staying true to artistic integrity means. If a record was recorded mono (mostly very old recordings), and then re-mixed or re-mastered to be stereo, it means that someone other than the original artist or engineer has altered the source material. This concept is contrary to some people's desire for the original ...


3

This question is way too broad. there are pleny of places you can read up on personal techniques and mixing preferences on the web. I say this to help you...this kind of question is a bad way to approach people who can share knowledge with you. Take the time to educate yourself and develop informed...and specific...questions. You'll develop some of your own ...


3

What you're asking here is basically like asking how to build a car from scratch, in detail. Not only is it extremely technical, different cars demand different ways to be built. Same goes here. A good book to read how 5.1 works and why is Tomlinson Holmans - 5.1 Up And Running. The only true rule is: You do what you must. Nothing more, nothing less. What ...


3

You need a 2 mono to 1 stereo 3.5 adapter. (As it seems the input of the Zoom H1 is a 3.5 mm female jack). This is not a Y combiner. That is a cable with 2 female mono 3.5 mm jack to 1 male stereo 3.5 jack. For example :


3

It's a mono output jack, so needs a mono jack, or preferably TRS with bridge, if you're going to a stereo headphone amp. A regular TRS > TRS will arrive at the headphone amp as one side of a 'stereo' feed, so will need bridging to provide dual mono. You can buy jack converters that will do this, or with a soldering iron, connect left & right, leaving ...


2

The answer is MS, or Mid-side. There are 2 types of "ambiance" situations that are very different. The first is dialogue recording with mono mics. Mono ambiances from those mics are needed to patch up issues and replace the talent mics at certain parts to cover other sounds. That is a critical function of mono sounds, but those are not technically field ...


2

The one that sounds the best. Generally it's stereo, but it depends on the sound, context, mix and playback device(s). As pointed out below, music and ambiences are almost always stereo, but in terms of SFX and dialogue it's more of a matter of taste and depends on the processes that have been applied as well (e.g. a stereo reverb). If the playback device is ...


2

If you go for a professional video suite such as Premier, then this is very straightforward, however if your budget won't stretch that far you can do it in three steps: AviDeMux or FFMpeg will let you split audio from video. Once you have the audio separated from the video this is easily done in any DAW by simply splitting the left and right into two ...


2

If you assign the output of your stereo tracks to a mono bus, set the input of a mono track to the bus and then record to the mono track, you will get a stereo to mono downmix. However, you should be careful to monitor the mono track, as it's very possible that the combination of the L and R channels will cause phasing. I'd recommend using a single channel ...


2

I'm having a tough time understanding what that reviewer is talking about. "Most headsets use stereo mics."?!? A microphone is, in it's nature, mono. The way your adapter is wired, yes, it is just a regular TRRS jack. Left, Right, Mic, Ground (not necessarily in that order :). I couldn't find any wiring diagrams for this adapter, but I don't think ...


2

I don't believe there is a way to do what you are looking for mostly because there isn't much of a practical reason for it. Pretty much any reasonably modern connection is going to handle streaming audio without buffering, so running multiple bitrates and trying to switch between them on the fly shouldn't be necessary. Also, changing from stereo to mono as ...


2

As such, I would never mix effects on the sides but nothing in center, and I normally place most effects, and here I'm talking about straight in-frame effects, pretty much centered, with only reverbations in the sides and rear. Unless it's panned. Then it's still mono plus acoustics, but panned. On certain rather big things though, like close ups to trains, ...


2

Well, as you've noticed yourself, it will normally work. This is because both channel outputs should be expected to have the same output impedance, so wiring them parallel effectively creates an averaging circuit. However, this is not really an intended mode of operation. The output impedance of this combined output will be half the individual impedance, ...


2

I'd record it stereo and if you need mono to fit into the mix or scene better just use one channel. Depending on how large the apartment is supposed to be you could mix and match the channels used.


2

Take a look at the bottom of the Channel Strip section. Here you will find a Format button that shows if the track is stereo or mono (there is a two-circle icon indicating it is stereo): or Click-hold the button and select either Left or Right channel: Additional details in the manual around page 264-265. Note that if you want to physically change the ...


2

Those outputs are actually mono. When combined they provide the desired stereo effect You can use the cable to connect the L or R output to the speaker, yet need to be careful when using panning on the channel buses as this will effect volume in this situation


2

If you only have one speaker, you will only be able to output mono sound. Stereo sound requires two speakers. By convention, you should use the left 1/4 in. output to run to your speaker and ensure that the PAN knobs are all moved to the left (since you aren't using the right output). It is also worth noting that unless your speaker is powered, you will ...


2

SOME M/S microphones provide discrete access to the Mid and Side outputs, but most provide only the matrixed Left and Right derived signal outputs. Your question cannot be definitively answered as a generic question. It depends on exactly WHICH M/S mic you are talking about and whether it provides Mid and Side outputs? Specifically, the Sennheiser MKH ...


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