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Often (but not always) "gain" on a line-in is actually attenuation. "Line-In" can refer to a number of different signal levels, ranging from -10dbV to +6 dbu (this part you may already know). A "line-in" jack can be set to take say -10dbV, at 0 attenuation, and then attenuate the signal accordingly as the signal get's hotter. However "gain" is more ...


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To which input should I insert both an active di-box with a passive guitar and a passive dibox with an active guitar? MIC input without phantom power (unless the active DI box is powered by phantom power). To which inputs should I insert all the rest of the guitars without di-box and different types of the pickups? INST input. How can my 3-4 ...


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Hi Would be great if it were possible, but as far as I know the output from the receiver is mono and there is no way of getting a stereo signal from it. You would need to look into the Sennheiser IEM systems as these are stereo.


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Line in is an audio input normally around 150mv line sensitivity and can be used for devices such as tape players,cd players,mp3 players etc. It cannot be used as a microphone input as you would hardly hear it, a microphone input needs to see an input sensitivity of around -5 mv input,as cd players and mp3 players already have an output of around 100+mVolts ...


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I helped answer your last question as well, and nothing is wrong with your setup. I understand your confusion, but take from this that +27dBu definitely does not mean you are outputting +27dB. The dBu numbers correspond to the nominal operating level of your equipment, and in the pro audio world -10dBu devices require more gain to reach the same nominal ...


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The internal sound card of the computer is most likely the problem. These onboard audio components are very cheaply made, meaning they are not designed to avoid interference from other components and power lines inside the computer and they also don't have the filtering to remove interference once it enters the audio path. Get an external audio interface: ...


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Headroom, mainly. Your peak voltage is 1.736 volt only when you have a sine wave signal of exactly +4 dBu (0VU on professional equipment). That never happens in the real world.. 0 on the meters is an averaged level, so with real-world audio signals you will have peaks far higher than 0VU. A peak of +20 (+24 dBu) would result in 35Vpp output which would ...


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Here's a great summary of the different signal levels: Mic level is the lowest, or weakest, level signal of the four and requires a preamplifier to bring it up to Line level. Instrument level signals live between mic and line level signals and have the most variation. You typically see this kind of signal come from an electric guitar or bass. A ...


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If you want to keep things technically 'correct' you'd need a dedicated DI box for exactly this, such as the Art's Dual RDB or the Avedis line PAD-Z. A pad will work (although you will be looking at a healthy attention - possibly more than what some pad switches offer). But the impedance matching won't be technically ideal. However, this may actually colour ...


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One meter is displaying dBV and the other is showing dBFS. which is what was suspected by Hobbes. Typical line level for dBFS is going to be between -18 and -12. So no big deal like audionuma said. It doesn’t have anything to do with peak or rms differences it is the difference between dBV and dBFS.


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Yes, you can use an external microphone preamplifier, these convert the mic signal to line level.


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Any unbalanced connection in a configuration such as this will unbalance the entire connection. The way to make this work is to connect the elements in the following way: Ground (Piano) ----- [ Ground (XLR) (Pin 1) --- Join to --- Signal- (Pin 3) ] Signal (Piano) ----- [ Signal+ (XLR) (Pin 2) ] If you want to balance the entire connection, you will need a ...


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Check out the hexdump of the file you created. When you do, you will realise that there are 7FFF values in the file that correspond to your sample peaks. But, I'm going to say that you also have clipping here. Why? Because I can see two values of 7FFF directly next to each other. This indicates that there are two identical peak sample values adjacent to ...


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you will never get the finger sound goodness in DI, why not use stereo technique, DI on left and Mic on right and blend it together for both high detail mic sound and clean DI sound. Most pro do it that way.


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Remember that the output from your iPhone or Mac is likely stereo. Do you have TWO of these speakers? Or do you want to combine the Left + Right signals together into a monaural signal? You will need some way to combine the Left + Right signals together if you have only one speaker. There will be no significany "loss of quality" feeding the headphone ...


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It's not a good idea, because the levels on both the line output and the headphone output are much too high for the camera mic input. If you were to turn the volume down on the headphone output, you'd probably end up with a lot of noise on the camera recording. What you really need here is a line-mic attenuator cable. This is a cable (or adapter) that ...


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Make sure you are using the correct outputs of the focusrite interface to connect to your speakers. A very common issue would be if you connected the headphone out of the interface to a line-in of the speakers. Headphone outputs carry a different (oversimplified: louder) signal than the line outs, so that could be the problem here since that would result ...


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EMV is very much correct but there are a number of things you can do to reduce the hum. Make sure all of the audio equipment is on the same circuit to help reduce chance that you are in a ground loop. Add a ferite clip to the analog audio cable. Change the surge protector that you are using. Different pieces of equipment can be more sensitive to cheap ...


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The microphones that you have listed are probably using something called 'plug-in power' which is a small amount of power supplied from the soundcard. PC soundcards and some external recorders provide this power but its only from the 3.5mm minijack connection. This 'plug-in power' is usually used for electret condenser microphones. The Mackie mixer is for ...


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There's no such thing as an unpowered condenser mic. (Well, there might be some, but the signal-to-noise ratio would probably render them completely unusable). These mics are (I reckon) electret condenser mics, which indeed need no external voltage applied to the capsule itself, but they do need a small voltage for the (usually very minimalistic) active ...


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Im pretty sure the feed is summed to send wirelessly. But you can always use two TXU / RXU and make it stereo the long way.


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You can do two things. There is a "fader assign" menu that let's you map the front knobs to the individual channel strips (you can even assign multiple channels to one knob, which is a nice feature if you're doing things like stereo recording). The knobs can be configured to control both input and output faders. Just make sure you keep track of how you set ...


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As Submadreamgun said you can do it with a good preamp and a good DI, but there is a great solution for that matter, this box that combines both for doing it very easily during live gigs : http://sub-continental.com/dd/bodyplug.html Here's how to plug your setup : http://sub-continental.com/dd/modules/bodyplug/bodyplug.pdf It combines a high-end class A ...


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I've been using a multi effects pedal for almost 6 years for my guitar. Recently, my wife and I were wanting to be able to build a karaoke set up that is compact. When using a laptop didn't work out because of feedback issues, I tried plugging the mic to the guitar pedal and use the guitar amp for vocals. I've experimented editing some patches to get me a ...


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There is way easier way to do all of this. Maybe the sound quality isn't as good, or it's causing some issue that I'm not aware of, but I've been doing it for years and it works just fine for me. Just buy an inline impedance transformer. You just plug it on to the end of of an xlr cable, and it converts it into hi-z 1/4" output. They cost 20 bucks. Run your ...


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