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7

The response curves are for each of the three selectable roll-off switch positions... Flat –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz From the spec sheet - Low Frequency Response Switch Positions Flat; –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz; –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz


7

I'm not saying this answers everything but the Fletcher Munson curves give an indication of how our hearing is sensitive to some frequencies and not others. Here is the graph taken from wiki that shows the FM curves and the ISO equal loudness curves for various sound pressure levels: - A small side-note. As the sound intensity drops our ability to hear bass ...


5

The point is to have the necessary frequency response or usual power output requirements well within the nominal spec for the product, thus minimising distortion or other unwanted non-linearity. With microphones the point is also to provide extended frequency response to recordists who plan on manipulating the sounds later. With audio software plugins ...


5

Most people have difficulty hearing 18 kHz, except at very loud levels. Quite possibly, even with perfectly flat transmission, you'd have trouble hearing that frequency while the voice level remains bearable. Now, partly because the very high-end is hard to hear, hifi speakers tend to boost them quite a bit so as to sound particularly "crisp" – not ...


5

Amplitude Taken from here: The human ear can consciously discriminate amplitude differences of about 1dB, and experiments show subconscious awareness of amplitude differences under .2dB. Although a complete answer would probably have to account to the equal loudness contours - we may be able to tell a 1dB difference with 1kHz, but not so for 100Hz. ...


4

Ears are not a very good tool for sound measurement. I would spend a couple of bucks on a sound analyzer app for your phone - I have SignalSpy on the iPhone - and set it to spectrum analysis. Hold the microphone near your headphones and "listen" to the sound. You should see a nice spike in the spectrum: something like this Sound was generated with ...


3

It is possible in some sense, and I believe there is software around that is designed specifically for this, but there are also reasons why this might not be the best approach. Obviously the character of your speakers affects the sound dramatically, but so to does the room. Measuring the response accurately enough to implement the EQ effectively would really ...


3

To answer your question directly there is no way of knowing which one is better, the measurements are lacking. There is no way a Subwoofer will play up to 1700hz. Those specifications are nonsense. Frequency Range of Speakers Humans hearing range is between 20 and 20 000 hz. 20 000 hz can be written as 20khz which you will see very often. As you age your ...


2

Systems such as SMAART and other Real Time Analyser based approaches can be used to level a system against EQ variation at a particular output level, however the problem is that the variations in a speaker can often be somewhat dynamic. The exact behavior of a speaker is going to be a combination of how accurately it's voice coil is able to control the ...


1

I'm going to cut to the chase and keep this really simple for you. Firstly, you don't really need to worry too much about the overall recorded sound in a practise environment as you should only be concerned with the overall performance and interpretation at this stage. So really we need to discuss the recorded sound either in a recording session situation ...


1

There's a whole lot of misunderstanding going on in your question… … what's going to disappoint you still further is even when you get to the end of this rambling essay, you're still not going to have a definitive answer. That's because you could write entire books on the subject [& people have]. Firstly, though the lowest fundamental on a regular ...


1

If you want the freq response curve (transfer function) of your speaker, or room, or any piece of gear you can use this software or other similar programs: https://www.rodetest.com/ Just hook up an audio interface, a line out to a power amp, and a mic and you can send sweeps thru just about anything. Much quicker I think. If you're really fancy you can ...


1

As said in a comment above the measuring would be really hard if you do it by yourself. There is already software for this though: http://www.sonarworks.com/headphones The software basically does exactly what you asked for. You have a separate measuring tool which generates a file that you can import in a vst plugin that you put on your master channel. As ...


1

That's a great question. I think your explanation of the problem would be good to share with customers, educating them rather than providing them with a meaningless spec. Then maybe link to a couple of sample recordings of common sources recorded with your mic attached to some likely surfaces. It really is an interesting problem. Wonder what Shure, Crown, ...


1

Well if your mic is static, point it away from the speakers and you should be good.....not meaning to dismiss your question but most real world situations call for vocal mics that are in constant motion as among your hottest items onstage. All the movement means a phase-based solution is impossible. I'm also not at all convinced that when feedback occurs,...


1

I would check out the level difference range speced for that frequency range. My guess is that those headphones reproduce 15Hz and 18kHz alot lower than 1kHz.


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It's interesting to note that the Sennheiser HD 800 is specified as : - Frequency response (headphones) 14 – 44100 Hz (- 3 dB) Is it a coincidence that they specify the frequency of 44.1kHz - this is the sampling frequency of digital audio in CDs! It's also quite interesting that there appears to be no published graph of frequency response when tested in ...


1

For high frequencies, the answer comes down to the inherent problems with sampling. Up to about 2 times is horrible - aliasing and sampling errors ruin the sound, so for a given piece of music you need to sample at eg 48kHz to avoid this (as humans can hear to 20-22 kHz). If you are editing or processing tracks though, you need to double again to ensure ...


1

The Sennheiser - MKH series are analog-boost-eq inside the mic preamplifier in order to get an extended frequency response. I used MKH - 8020 @ 192kHz for slowed down fx and I get high frequency noise. Neumann mics don't have this eq boost, the highs may be more natural and less noisy. I don't know for Schoeps and DPA.


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Sennheiser MKH 8020, 8040, and 8050 record out to around 50kHz. They are outstanding, quiet mics. Schoeps MK capsules with CMC-6 XT bodies record out to 40kHz. Also amazing mics. A little more self noise than the Sennheisers, but they sound great and handle mid range frequencies very well.


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