8

When you have a measurement of inches referring to a speaker it is the diameter of that speaker, so a 12" 400W speaker is physically 12" wide and is rated at a maximum of 400 Watts. The wattage is so you know how much power you can push through the speaker without damaging it. More Watts = more volume The physical size is very closely related to the ...


8

Suggestive Specifications Both the inches and the Watts are suggestive specifications of the following: Inches - The approximate diameter of the bass driver cone (if there is more than one driver, like in multi-way design). It is an approximation since some designs spell 8'' for what is really 7.8''. This spec vaguely correlates to the lowest frequency the ...


7

As you still seem to wonder about differences in sound between different speaker sizes: The speaker diameter is not directly related to how much bass you can get. Most important for that is the cabinet size: without a cabinet, for any speaker most of the air will just "flow around" from front to back vice versa, if given enough time; so some distance away ...


6

The connectors are simply there to allow you to daisy chain speakers. You can go in one and out the other. The order does not matter at all as it is just a basic parallel circuit with the drivers in the middle.


6

At first I was reluctant to answer this question, as I believe in order to do this properly, will cost more than the value of said sub-woofer. However as nobody else has commented, I will give you an answer on how you can do this. There are two problems we need to overcome: The mixer has no further outputs to connect the subwoofer. The subwoofer has ...


5

The audio interface would be used instead of your sound card. The laptop itself shouldn't play a role in the quality of the sound. (Though it can happen... see @left's comment below) The sound quality will be affected by the signal chain. I.e., the original audio quality, the settings of the software you use to edit the audio, the interface you ...


4

The way I look at it is that the speaker is an air pump. The larger the diaphragm, the more air that can potentially be pumped. However, the larger the pump, the more resistant to moving the air it will be. Like trying to waft a big sheet of cardboard around, you need strong arms to waft it faster, and if someone asked you to waft the card 2x per second, ...


4

The M3D sub you mentioned includes a technical description of the function directly on the product page. A pair of 18-inch drivers is mounted at the front of the cabinet, and works in conjunction with a pair of 15-inch drivers facing the rear and is driven by a sophisticated phase manipulation circuit. The resulting directional pattern assures that ...


4

An electronic circuit is what the name implies - a circuit. For it to work there has to be a continuous unbroken loop from the power source (in this case the amplifier) through the load (the coils in the speaker) and back to the amplifier. Hence the two wires. Without an unbroken loop no current can flow, and nothing can happen. Another way to look at it ...


4

First, you will need to provide a power amplifier for each different speaker cabinet. You did not mention what model you have so we don't know what power, what kind of processing, etc. you would need. Then you will need to divide your signal (source not disclosed) into the channels appropriate for each speaker cabinet and come up with five wireless links ...


4

MDF has very good acoustic properties at a low price. But it is heavy and does not hold up well to being bumped around. Also doesn't do well in moist environments. It is not used for pro portable speakers for those reasons. It's a good choice for speakers that won't be moved very much. Almost all professional speakers use void free Baltic Birch plywood. ...


4

Electrically, yes. Acoustically no. You also have to take into consideration the physical effects of having multiple point-sources of audio, specifically the way that each point-source interacts with the other. IF you are placing these four speakers inside a single cabinet, then there are other acoustic effects relating to bass porting and cabinet volume to ...


4

There's quite a few ways this question can be answered, but perhaps the most concise way to do it is to ask you to consider the properties of waves in general. You understand that in order to produce sound, the membrane has to vibrate. In order to vibrate, a force must act upon it and that force is provided by the coil and the magnet that sit at the apex of ...


3

I can't tell the exact speaker model, but they are studio monitors from KRK Systems. The devices on the bottom of that photo are production switchers, which are designed for doing live video production. The screens appear to be the monitors for the switchers themselves, so it isn't software, it is hardware. You are also probably looking at atleast 25 ...


3

There is a logic to your argument, but the problem arises from the fact that there are thousands of models of consumer speaker, all with their own way of 'flattering' the sound. If you mix on one pair, it may become bass heavy on another. The idea behind studio monitors is that the sound is as neutral as possible, so that the mix will more or less be ...


3

It is impossible to tell without the input impedance of the speakers, but generally speaking the answer to your question is yes - you can damage either the speakers or the amp. Say your speakers are each 8 ohms. If you connect 3 in series, you'll be presenting 24 ohms to the amp (8 + 8 + 8). This means the speakers will easily 'suck' the power off the amp, ...


3

If you are referring to the hardware that retains the jack, in the US it is a 3/8-32 jam nut. Most likely.


3

Sound doesn't really care about gravity, so there aren't nevessarily implications. The main problem there could be is vibrations: a low-lying woofer can more easily be held stable in place. But that's probably not much of an issue for the applications this thing is designed for. The reason they build it like this seem obvious enough: to keep the center of ...


3

It's generally expected that you do a little bit of research before asking questions here and that you only ask one question. In this case the manual for this device answers the question quite clearly. The Amp Out provides a 1/4 inch mono output of guitar processed with amp modeling and effects and optimized for connecting to the input of a guitar ...


3

You are correct in assuming that the speakers can only withstand the peak power for very short periods of time. The VP2520 is a 4 Ω speaker. Looking at the technical specs of the amp, it seems the continous power per channel for a 4 Ω load is only 500 W (rms). The peak power is 750 W per channel. In other words, the VP2520 appears to be a perfect match for ...


3

You are probably trying to connect passive speakers to line out level outputs, therefore the low acoustic level. What you need is a four channels power amplifier with 4 ohms speakers outputs.


3

"Music" power is a rating that has its closest analogs in "RMS" power or "continuous" power handling. That means it is a long-term rating based on the speaker's capability to dissipate heat that is the byproduct of the conversion of electrical power to acoustic power. This rating means that you should be able to feed this speaker up to about 120 Watts of a ...


3

Yes, and these already exist in various forms, from sound weapons to localised 'personal' audio devices. The vast majority use a parabolic reflector, as you correctly surmised. Some background here. But this one uses interesting technology with an array of Ultrasonic speakers which provide interference at the target which is within audible frequencies.


3

Well, it's like a game of Blackjack: to know the answer for sure, you'd have to bust your speakers. If you have any amplifier at home or that you can borrow for a while, connect the speakers, put some music on WITH VOLUME SET A ZERO, and VERY CAREFULLY, turn up the volume litlle by little to see (actually to hear) how the speakers behave. Unless the amp is ...


3

This is why studio monitors used in recording produce neutral sound as close to 1:1 as possible. Consumer audio gear, either because of being cheap or because of being intentionally biased, have a strong impact on the way playback sounds. These changes are designed such that they will play back a neutrally mixed sound to the best of the particular design's ...


3

There are a number of factors involved here but mainly frequency response, transient response, signal to noise ratio (S/N) and total harmonic distortion (THD). Frequency response is largely dependent on the size, shape and mass of a speaker cone and there is no such thing as a speaker with perfect frequency response. But most significantly, the size of a ...


3

You could have a look into processing the recordings with the help of a binaural panning tool such as the one included in Logic. You would import the two channels of your audio files as two seperate mono tracks into the DAW and process each of them with the binaural panner. Using Psypan by Auburn Sounds in combination with Audacity would be a free ...


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