Hot answers tagged

9

If you use a new crappy cable, it's going to sound worse than a well-made and cared for high-quality cable that's 10 years old. But by the same token, a well-used workhorse cable that's been cared for properly for 10 years might not sound as good as something studio-grade. Age really has nothing to do with it. Quality, construction, and care are what ...


7

The warnings from WLPhoenix and Josh are absolutely correct: most cable connections do never have a significant influence on the sound, regardless of the cable brand. There is one important exception: guitar cables. Because most electric guitars have only primitive passive high-impedance electronics (the same applies to passive electric basses), supplied ...


7

1/4" TS/TRS is a far superior interconnect than RCA/phono in every way, except size. If you have to choose an output for an instrument, it should be 1/4" if at all possible. 1/4" TS cables are more robust, much more easily repairable, and are used throughout the professional audio industry. RCA cables were invented (by RCA) for use in consumer electronics,...


6

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


6

It is not a typo. TRS stands for tip, ring and sleeve. A TRS plug is the three-contact version of the TS plug (tip and sleeve). F stands for female. Male and female plugs of the same type can connect to each other. The 1/4" TRSF to dual 1/4" TS cable is used to convert a TRS cable to two TS cables.


5

I think the most straight forward solution would be using a DI unit. Once you connect it to your source(PC), you will have a balanced signal which you can safely carry on a balanced cable for 100ft (or even more).


5

Like most things, it depends. There are several factors at play: the impedance of the source, the nature of the circuit (balanced vs unbalanced), the capacitance of the cable, etc. Ideally you want a low impedance source driving a low-capacitance, balanced circuit. The impedance of the source is a big factor. A low driving impedance will not be affected as ...


5

Travis, you have, perhaps unwittingly, stumbled upon a question that has raged for quite some time. In short, there is no answer. Or more to the point, there is no agreed-upon answer. The Wikipedia entry on this is fairly concise for the tl;dr crowd... There is debate among audiophiles surrounding the impact that high-end cables have on audio systems ...


5

Signal Quality - there shouldn't be any difference in signal quality between a good RCA cable and a good 1/4" cable, as long as the connector and jack are making good electrical contact. The problem lies in making good electrical contact. As NReilingh states, RCA plugs were designed for consumer electronics and probably also minimal cost. Our modern 1/4" ...


4

Do audio cable splitters reduce signal quality or add noise? Not in principle. Assuming the input impedance of both recipients is substantially smaller than the output impedance of the mixer (which it normally is), both do ideally recieve exactly the same signal that each of them would if connected alone. However in practise, there is one problem which ...


4

The point of the connector is to make it more secure. The plastic clip isn't very strong on a standard network jack and that isn't good for live production environments that aren't permanent installs. You can use a normal cable just fine as long as the plastic clip can actually latch in place. If it doesn't actually latch in place, you can just put an end ...


4

You have to use some other cable. I usually go with Teflon in difficult thermal situations. In general, the thermal performance of PVC may be severely inadequate for the 120°C conditions you've mentioned. Many forms of PVC insulation are rated as low as 80°C. Here are some supporting references to back up this claim: See Semi-Rigid PVC (SR-PVC) under the ...


4

First, you will need to provide a power amplifier for each different speaker cabinet. You did not mention what model you have so we don't know what power, what kind of processing, etc. you would need. Then you will need to divide your signal (source not disclosed) into the channels appropriate for each speaker cabinet and come up with five wireless links ...


3

Yes, they do wear out eventually. As pointed out already, the life time depends greatly on use and quality. Even with a cable that seemingly works sound quality may get drastically reduced. See below. The type of defects you will start to see over time, can be categorized into three main areas: mechanical damage corrosion dry out/cracking Mechanical ...


3

A balanced mic would certainly help. Another option is to use a direct box to go from an unbalanced mic input to a balanced line (XLR). The best bet would really be to get an actual mic with balanced output. Also, in a pinch, a 25 foot run is totally doable with an unbalanced cable if it is well shielded. It isn't ideal, but it should be workable as long ...


3

Your consumer grade optical link (the mentioned TosLink is Toshiba's name for a consumer standard) has a technical limit of 10 meters. It has been reported as being useable at up to 30 meters, but quality may suffer. For best quality, what you probably want to do is go to a balanced format for the run. I don't know what you have available at the ...


3

Radio Shack sells male and female audio connectors in a variety of sizes/formats, including the 3.5 mm type. Take care with your soldering to minimize the effect on sound quality.


3

Stereo cables aren't special in any sense that would stop them from operating as independent halves. A common ground might cause some issues if you have two sources with different earth grounds, but in general this shouldn't be a problem.


3

XLR connector pros compared to jacks/TRS connectors: It is not as easily pulled out (it locks when connected). It is thicker; thus more rugged The physical interface is larger (pins into tubes), thus better electrical connection. The physical construction makes it much harder to cause disconnection failures due to pulling and pushing. The signal ground is ...


3

Advantages: saves you rolling out 2 long cables. Disadvantages: it's a 2.4 GHz system so there's potential for interference from wifi. they add a bit of delay, although 4 ms is not horrendous. you have to remember to recharge the batteries for each gig. every 3-5 years you have to replace the batteries because they wear out. I use a couple of wireless ...


2

Simple answer is if you are feeding a stereo signal to a single input you need the signal to be summed so you do not lose any elements. To do this you need 3 resistors in the XLR end, diagrams are available online however its not a simple solder job. If you shop around you can get stereo to mono cables but make sure they have resistors and are summed to one ...


2

You shouldn't have an issue with one split off of a mic. You should probably use the battery power option on the NTG2 , just to keep things simple. In general, this method will probably work better with a set of higher input impedance pre-amps. That's just a general observation, as I don't know what the input impedance on the H4n is off the top of my head. ...


2

My favorite kind is the one that reaches sufficiently from point A to point B and all the pins on one end are the same as the other.


2

You will absolutely have to use a DirectBox for this. You may also need a transformer to clean up impedance mismatches and noise coming out of the PC. Note that a headphone output from a computer is going to be powered, not line level. If you have a professional audio card in there, then going straight to a DI should be ok, but if not, then you will need ...


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