Hot answers tagged

11

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


7

1/4" TS/TRS is a far superior interconnect than RCA/phono in every way, except size. If you have to choose an output for an instrument, it should be 1/4" if at all possible. 1/4" TS cables are more robust, much more easily repairable, and are used throughout the professional audio industry. RCA cables were invented (by RCA) for use in consumer electronics,...


7

These sockets and plugs are designed to work in exactly this way. When you plug a 'TS' plug into a TRS balanced jack socket, the "ring and sleeve" are bridged. This is exactly the correct way to unbalance a balanced connection. It works in the way it was designed to. Additionally, by unbalancing that output connection, you reduce the level of the output by ...


5

Signal Quality - there shouldn't be any difference in signal quality between a good RCA cable and a good 1/4" cable, as long as the connector and jack are making good electrical contact. The problem lies in making good electrical contact. As NReilingh states, RCA plugs were designed for consumer electronics and probably also minimal cost. Our modern 1/4" ...


5

I think the most straight forward solution would be using a DI unit. Once you connect it to your source(PC), you will have a balanced signal which you can safely carry on a balanced cable for 100ft (or even more).


4

Yes, they do wear out eventually. As pointed out already, the life time depends greatly on use and quality. Even with a cable that seemingly works sound quality may get drastically reduced. See below. The type of defects you will start to see over time, can be categorized into three main areas: mechanical damage corrosion dry out/cracking Mechanical ...


4

The point of the connector is to make it more secure. The plastic clip isn't very strong on a standard network jack and that isn't good for live production environments that aren't permanent installs. You can use a normal cable just fine as long as the plastic clip can actually latch in place. If it doesn't actually latch in place, you can just put an end ...


4

You have to use some other cable. I usually go with Teflon in difficult thermal situations. In general, the thermal performance of PVC may be severely inadequate for the 120°C conditions you've mentioned. Many forms of PVC insulation are rated as low as 80°C. Here are some supporting references to back up this claim: See Semi-Rigid PVC (SR-PVC) under the ...


4

First, you will need to provide a power amplifier for each different speaker cabinet. You did not mention what model you have so we don't know what power, what kind of processing, etc. you would need. Then you will need to divide your signal (source not disclosed) into the channels appropriate for each speaker cabinet and come up with five wireless links ...


3

Well, as you've noticed yourself, it will normally work. This is because both channel outputs should be expected to have the same output impedance, so wiring them parallel effectively creates an averaging circuit. However, this is not really an intended mode of operation. The output impedance of this combined output will be half the individual impedance, ...


3

Stereo cables aren't special in any sense that would stop them from operating as independent halves. A common ground might cause some issues if you have two sources with different earth grounds, but in general this shouldn't be a problem.


3

Radio Shack sells male and female audio connectors in a variety of sizes/formats, including the 3.5 mm type. Take care with your soldering to minimize the effect on sound quality.


3

I don't know anyone who has actually noticed an audio difference between 1/8" and 1/4" jacks on their headphones. In fact many higher end headphones come now with adapters! That said, the big difference between the 1/4" and the 1/8" jacks comes from usability. As another responder already mentioned when things were miniaturized they had to drop the jack size....


3

Your consumer grade optical link (the mentioned TosLink is Toshiba's name for a consumer standard) has a technical limit of 10 meters. It has been reported as being useable at up to 30 meters, but quality may suffer. For best quality, what you probably want to do is go to a balanced format for the run. I don't know what you have available at the ...


3

A balanced mic would certainly help. Another option is to use a direct box to go from an unbalanced mic input to a balanced line (XLR). The best bet would really be to get an actual mic with balanced output. Also, in a pinch, a 25 foot run is totally doable with an unbalanced cable if it is well shielded. It isn't ideal, but it should be workable as long ...


3

XLR connector pros compared to jacks/TRS connectors: It is not as easily pulled out (it locks when connected). It is thicker; thus more rugged The physical interface is larger (pins into tubes), thus better electrical connection. The physical construction makes it much harder to cause disconnection failures due to pulling and pushing. The signal ground is ...


3

Advantages: saves you rolling out 2 long cables. Disadvantages: it's a 2.4 GHz system so there's potential for interference from wifi. they add a bit of delay, although 4 ms is not horrendous. you have to remember to recharge the batteries for each gig. every 3-5 years you have to replace the batteries because they wear out. I use a couple of wireless ...


2

You will absolutely have to use a DirectBox for this. You may also need a transformer to clean up impedance mismatches and noise coming out of the PC. Note that a headphone output from a computer is going to be powered, not line level. If you have a professional audio card in there, then going straight to a DI should be ok, but if not, then you will need ...


2

Simple answer is if you are feeding a stereo signal to a single input you need the signal to be summed so you do not lose any elements. To do this you need 3 resistors in the XLR end, diagrams are available online however its not a simple solder job. If you shop around you can get stereo to mono cables but make sure they have resistors and are summed to one ...


2

Most sound boards use mono channels. You can't feed stereo in to a mono channel. Since it supports TRS balanced audio, one channel is inverted and combined with the other, this results in canceling out all but whatever is different between the left and right channel. XLR won't help because XLR is designed for mono audio and still is going in to a mono ...


2

Sound quality is probably the first reason. A balanced audio signal only works when the interference/noise is the same on both signals. After inverting the sound signal, the noises that were identical on both signals will only be canceled out. So if there is any interference on the signal, make it happen that they are the same on both cables. When using a ...


2

As the other answers have said, banana plugs will not fit. However, so-called “pin” plugs are designed to fit speaker jacks, and a little searching suggests there also exist adapters from banana plugs to pins, though as a much more obscure item; here's an unfortunately unavailable example which nicely shows the difference in size between banana plugs and ...


2

No, it won't work. Those inputs are design for keyboards or similar, therefore they don't have preamps. Overheads are usually condenser mics too, so if yours are, these inputs won't supply phantom power for them to work either. In order to make them work with those inputs, you'll need external pre amplifiers, but for the money, you'll be better upgrading ...


2

After a lot of research I figured this out. It's simple once you know which letters go to which: I connected them as follows and it worked: BROWN: XLR 1 (ground) -> JACK S (sleeve) RED: XLR 2 (hot right) -> JACK R (ring) WHITE: XLR 3 (cold left) -> JACK T (tip) G is the chassis ground and is not normally used. I still don't know ...


2

XLR 2 (hot) should go to JACK TIP, XLR 3 (cold) should go to JACK RING, XLR 1 (ground) should go to JACK SLEEVE The TN, RN and GN connections are used in the XLR combi connectors with extra switching contacts. On the picture these points are empty, so no switching contacts here.


2

Best practice is to connect XLR pin 2 to TIP (T), pin 3 to RING (R). Pin 1 is always GROUND. The TN, RN, GN, refer to TIP NORMAL, RING NORMAL, GROUND NORMAL, which would have additional pinouts if they were available on the connector. A "Normal" circuit is one that passes the current UNLESS a plug is inserted to break the connection (break the "NORMAL.") ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible