9

Record one long shot. Split it from the half. Put one half to the right channel and the other to left channel. Export a stereo file. This way you will get a very wide stereo image that is hard to get from a stereo field recording and your sounds in the front will be clearly distinct from ambience. Do not just transform to stereo. If you do that, you will ...


4

I had a scene in a short film I did last year where I did something fun. The film is a period piece, so no modern sounds anywhere. A woman is sitting alone in a room contemplating a potion she's in the process of making that will kill her unborn child - saving it from her abusive husband. I put a clock in the room (even though there wasn't one ...


4

Proper stereo image is also important. One of the reasons many exterior BGs don't seem to work at first for interior locations is that they're too wide. If you pull them in quite a bit (maybe even mono all the way for some) it helps a lot. Same with distant car passes and the like.


4

Record 2 mono claps/pulses/shots, however you're generating it. Move the mic from one side of the room to the other for each, keeping each at the same distance from the source. Match up the initial claps later, save as stereo. It won't be perfect, but no-one except you will ever know ;-)


3

My short answer would be that it is virtually impossible but depends on how good results you expect. The solution your intuition draws you to, and which would work in certain cases, is phase cancellation. Basically, if you have two sound sources, exactly the same, and reverse the polarity of one they will cancel each other out. The simplest example of this ...


3

It's not impossible to record ambiences that are near-silent, if you choose to go that route. You'll have to go out of your way to find them, probably very late at night or very early on a Sunday morning when the urban noise is at its lowest, but it can be achieved. Even with a pristine recording of a silent background, you're going to have to manufacture ...


3

Offstage exterior "bleedthru" sounds I believe are one of the great challenges of backgrounds - up there with wind, ocean/beach textures, and rain. In terms of how to paint it sonically so it pops, but doesn't draw unwanted attention to itself, while also not sounded like a muddy mess of frequencies with a lack of clear intent. The hallmark to doing this ...


3

I absolutely agree with what Jay says, but it's also worth noting that using the sound from the interior of the vehicle even during lengthy external shots is a little used but effective technique. Most audiences will naturally connect the sound of the interior with the external shot of the car, but if you use this technique carefully it can really force the ...


3

If you mean just the dialog, you'd do better starting from the 5.1 audio as a source. The centre channel should be dialog only. If you want to include the music, or if you only have the audio as stereo, then it's not possible. You cannot unbake a cake. Late Edit: There is now the very good yet very expensive Izotope RX which has a "Music Rebalance" plugin ...


2

well, one great film with BGs is 'No Country For Old Men' - lack of music in spots, BG's hold the scene and the tension runs very high, foley and BG - thats it. (thinking desert scene)


2

Reversing is an easy, tried-and-true method that usually yields acceptable results. Or you could copy some non-discernable english from another part of the clip and use it as fill. Both approaches are standard. I wouldn't advise leaving holes in your track; they might sound like dropouts and flag a QC kickback. Keep in mind that the composite BG track is ...


2

recorded at what I believe to be the right perspective in terms of distance I believe this is why you are hitting a roadblock. Just because something was recorded according to reality does not mean it will translate in a mix the same way. In cutting BGz, 95% of the time this has proven true for me. We 'cheat' sounds all the time. It's all "what sounds ...


2

Really depends on the tone and mood of the scene. There may be times when it's appropriate to cut perspectives like that, but more often times than not the sound should be supporting the dialog, which is happening inside the car. But again, there are no rules - only conventions.


2

This is not my forte by any means, but a few thoughts come to mind... Air traffic. Planes, helicopters? You did mention planes though... Water fountain? Music? playing in passing cars, out a window Conversations? Utilities? steam vents, transformer buzz? Street vendors? calling out wares etc. Not sure how many of these would fall under the 'anxiety ...


2

Ding dong! Metro/subway/train doors opening, is one of my favorite city sounds. But I'm assuming you're dealing with exterior shots based on the ideas you've thrown out already. How about that muffled bassy thump that you can hear in a passing car or outside a club? That's the "pulse" of the city, and it's never far away even in the middle of the day. ...


2

If the two characters' dialog is panned centre in the mix then it should be possible. Separate the song into left and right channels, then phase reverse one channel. When you sum the audio back together, you'll cancel any material that previously appeared in both the left and right channels equally (i.e. hopefully the centre panned dialog). Now hopefully ...


2

Each of those numbers is the main frequency that you can change the volume of. You need practice (with your ear) to figure out what freq does what in your case, you just need to know that you only change frequency levels and nothing more (for start, Ι assume that if you don't know what those numbers are, you probably don't try nothing more complicated). You ...


2

I think what you're looking for is only to be found in CSI [city of your choice] not in real life. Izotope is about as good as it gets, but it needs a reasonably constant noise-floor to suppress. You could try a multi-band compressor to lift everything to the same level, but you'd be unlikely to be able to push the foreground conversation back far enough ...


1

I don't think you'll find a method that completely removes the backing, but you may be able to reduce the volume enough for an acceptable result: You simply put all the all the different versions on a track each in a multitrack program like Reaper, Cubase or Pro Tools. Make sure you precisely align the songs so the wave curves follow each other at sample ...


1

I don't fully understand the question. I think you could be confused about what a DJ does. Also, mixing songs as a DJ is a form of art, so basically anything can be done, as long as it sounds good to you. But you seem like you want an explanation of traditional, smooth song crossover mixing. So firstly, to make this answer a full one I'll try to explain it ...


1

Todd is right about the frequency overlap in his first OP reply comment, meaning simple EQing may not get you the results you require. However, something else to note is that the main vocals are commonly centered, spacially. So extracting this 'centre channel' will remove the unwanted side channels from the stereo file. The bass is also commonly centred, so ...


1

Adobe Audition has a built in Noise Reduction effect that works really well. Effects>Noise Reduction/Restoration. You can use this to capture the noise profile of the background music or other sounds you want to remove. Just find the longest section where only the unwanted sound is playing in isolation, and grab this. The longer the selection, the more ...


1

Additionally to JoshP's suggestions, general energetic crowd noises and street musicians can add character.


1

It could very well be related to windows audio settings. Windows can artificially boost the gain of an audio input device within software. This setting is located in Control Panel>Sound Click the "Recording" tab, then click on your desired audio device to highlight it, then click the "Properties" button Under the "Levels" tab you may have settings for ...


1

I've personally cut quite a few of these. They cropped up on Nikita often as well. My opinion is to break it down into it's main food groups: normal BG (the BG without the press conference - the roomtones or airs, birds traffic if outside, etc) walla bed walla callouts camz bed camz onscreen movement/knockabout The walla will have to be shaped for the ...


1

Wow that is a crazy post production/forensic/restauration job. The problem is that the signal is very little. What you can do is you can use volume envelopes to increase the directors voice. So that you push the level in-between the hosts words. Then there will be an extreme amount of background noise. Sou you can use a restoration plug in like stylus rx or ...


1

Kai, I have a vast collection of evocative winds and tonal backgrounds. if you'd like to get in touch, will tell you more. Would be happy to help. annk@soundmountain.com


1

To answer your questions: 1) Yes you can pan BGs with the surround panner. Many mixers for example will pan a stereo ambience slightly into the center channel. Check your mixes in mono if you are concerned about phasing issues. It's also better to cut with well recorded stereo ambiences (without any stereo phasing issues) in the first place. 2) M/S is ...


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