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6

All of that is perfectly normal. Boost vs. cut What our ears do is not really a Fourier transform like in spectrum analysers1, it's more comparable to an auto-correlation function. For instance, we still recognise pitches without a problem even when the fundamental frequency is completely missing! This is useful in natural hearing environments, since ...


5

Generally, you want to conceptualize this based on the reality of the situation you are trying to re-create. Firstly, shopping malls usually have crappy speakers, so imagine your sound being played through crappy speakers in a very large space, possibly with a fairly lengthy reverb time. Also, the speakers are often quite distant, so the ratio of direct ...


3

The 6 dB per octave roll-off is simply an approximation of the properties of the first order RC circuit - low pass filter design, i.e. it is not a convention or related to the fact that it is the double of 3 dB. Actually the roll-off is not exactly 6 dB per octave, it is 20log2 = 6,0205999132796239042... and this 20log2 formula again is a generalization of ...


3

What is causing this behavior? The tick sound is caused by a discontinuity in the derivative of your signal, producing a noisy sound at this very moment. How could (and should) I remove it? To keep your sound clean when changing frequency, you should avoid the discontinuity in the derivative of the sine wave before the change and the sine wave after the ...


3

The most relevant piece of software I could find is called Praat. It's free, and it offers spectral, pitch, and formant analysis—but it was developed for the study of phonetics. This is deep software though, and, though I feel comfortable in max, reaktor, and other visual programming environments, Praat is beyond me. It's the most relevant software i've ...


3

Vocal isolation/eliminations plugins generally work on the principle that lead vocals are centered and are going to have a particular EQ range. Guitars don't really have any such standards. Your best bet is to just run it through a parametric EQ and fiddle with it until you find the frequency bands that only have the guitar sounds in it. However, a guitar ...


3

DJ software like Native Instruments Traktor is pretty good at guessing the tempo by analysing a music track. It can also send out a MIDI clock signal that can be used to sync lights or something to. Ableton Live and some other programs can do Audio-To-Midi, with varying success: it works better on simple soundfiles and much worse on full musical songs with ...


3

If you are using lavalier mics [tiny headset or tie-mics that look no bigger than a knot in the wire] then you should not set them directly in front of the mouth, but at the side, or even in the hair, if you really want them hidden. Hidden in clothing is also an option, though you can get a lot of movement noise that way. Example images [stolen from Google, ...


3

Yes, there are ways to try to reduce echo, but they also negatively impact the sound with artifacts. You can use features like gates to try to cut off when someone stops talking directly, but those are probably best applied after recording. There is nothing that you can apply, in software, at the time of recording that you can't apply later. You don't ...


3

All I know is it seems to be a reference to french house, the "french touch," which is a filtered-disco sound. Expect a prominent, musical filter, but I am not an expert on filter design so I can't separate out the marketing angle from the reality of what you will get. Examples of the kind of music being referenced: http://thesearepowerfulhours.com/...


3

Well I've tried to come close : I used reaper, Izotope Trash 2 for saturation and Izotope Ozone 5 for multiband compression. 1. pitch shift - 3 semitones 2. Cut some low freqs with EQ 3. Izotope Trash with these settings : http://i.imgur.com/Sd5k2lq.jpg 4. Izotope Ozone with these settings : http://imgur.com/a/6RC4G You ...


3

This is an anti-aliasing filter. The --preset insane settings must allow aliasing to become apparent. Your iPhone can't reproduce the frequencies the filter is applied to anyway, and if it could, you wouldn't hear them. Disabling the filter would likely lead to a very slightly larger file, and some unwanted (lower) frequencies caused by aliasing. An anti-...


3

Side note: BRHSM (OP) is refering to Geek Technique #12 in issue 222 of Computer Music magazine. Great question, BRHSM. I have three answers for you, but only one is true. I'll let you come to your own conclusions. :) Option 1: I must confess, the video is one big deception. Everyone knows that filters always reduce amplitude and increase available ...


3

Processing always has the negative side effect of either increasing noise or taking away from the quality. The secret to processing is you want to do as little as possible to achieve what you want, and in this case that means removing steps that essentially do the same thing. As for the order here's what I would do. Normalize - This will amplify it to ...


3

As long as you have identical rolloff characteristics - slope and frequency, the mix of the two will be identical to the original signal. Whether the filter alters phase or not depends entirely on the design of the filter. For instance a basic first order R/C filter will alter the phase by between 45 and 90 degrees depending on slope and frequency. There ...


2

I have the exact same kit as yours. Honestly, while the MKH80xx series does have a big low end I've never had an issue with it. I even like it actually -- it's easy enough to filter it out if I have to, but for many effects that I record it actually adds a lot of oomph. Now, if you're planning on mounting the 8040 on a boom or doing a lot of handheld work, ...


2

See previous discussion here, SPL De-Verb is probably what you're looking for. You can watch a comparison between SPL, iZotope, Zynaptic in this YouTube video.


2

I'd be far more inclined to try fix it at source first. There are several plugins I've tried that attempt to de-verb, but none anywhere near as successfully as just not recording it in the first place. Simplest trick would be to hang a heavy blanket, duvet or similar on the wall behind you [or hang it over a spare boom stand etc, close up behind you], ...


2

3 options: 1. Izotope RX4 in demo mode, is capable of detecting 'similar sounds'. I haven't used in on voices, but it could work. But you need to consider that it needs clean samples (in the same recording) and that demo will only run for 1 month.. 2. Dragon Dictate is a dictation app that allows discrete dictation in ios and mac osx (maybe also other os'es)....


2

I can't beat the Wikipedia page on crossovers, so I'll just block quote it: First Order First-order filters have a 20 dB/decade (or 6 dB/octave) slope. All first-order filters have a Butterworth filter characteristic. First-order filters are considered by many audiophiles to be ideal for crossovers. This is because this filter type is 'transient perfect',...


2

I have just seen the following article where this sound effect is mentioned (http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/la-en-craft-star-wars-sound-20160204-story.html). It is interesting to note that the dialogue was recorded with two mics: one in the helmet itself and the other on the chest. Clearly the timbre of the two recordings will be different, ...


2

I'm guessing there are going to be as many variations on this chain as there are answers. [It could reasonably be claimed to be "too broad" but here goes... My brain doesn't work in numbers, it works in sounds, so I'm not going to comment on your individual plugin settings - they will all likely need changing if you swap to my recommendation anyway, as I ...


2

The Audacity manual on this page has this to day about the order of applying effects: Amplification or normalization may be done before or after Noise Reduction. Do any Notch Filtering or Click Removal before doing noise reduction. Do any compression or any other effects not mentioned above after doing noise reduction, not before. Also, please see the ...


2

This sounds like it may be a grounding issue. The most common source of such problems is differences or changes in ground between components. If that fixes it, you might want to start looking in to the grounding situation in your house and see if something is not properly grounding somewhere. If it is actually impacting the voltage levels of the house ...


1

I think this is more to do with phoneme recognition and pattern recognition. I had a transcription job to do recently on a documentary where the subject was speaking English but with a pronounced African accent. Where native English speakers might use two syllables for a particular world, this chap was using three. Took me a while to work out exactly what he ...


1

There are a lot of components that go into accents, ranging from how individual phonemes are articulated to sentence-level pitch contours. You can't hope to convert an accent into another one without an extremely laborious manual process that involves carefully adjusting formants and pitches. Even swapping one phoneme for another sounds tough. I'm not aware ...


1

A simple, natural, 1st order low pass filter (be it mechanical, electrical or any physical type imaginable) reduces the output signal in a natural way. For instance, above the cut-off frequency point, the output amplitude reduces proportional to frequency. An example might be an electrical low pass RC network: - So, if the cut off frequency is 1 kHz and you ...


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