6

I would recommend it only if you care about portability, and only for recording (not for mixing, mastering, or editing). Damon Albarn did it that way because he was recording while on tour, and he needed something portable. If you need to record while moving constantly, if you need portability, using any tablet (and interface) capable of running a DAW (you ...


4

Open the PT Shortcuts Guide PDF, then unplug the mouse and take it with you. Nothing made me faster with basic keyboard shortcuts than being 100% unable to reach for the mouse.


3

I'm going to chime in and agree 100%. Mentoring is crucial. I certainly would not have made it to where I am without the mentorship and help of a good many people in a good many things. Sadly, it's something we see less and less of these days. "Once upon a time" (really not THAT long ago) there was no such thing as a "Recording Arts Progam". If you were ...


3

As already mentioned above, when summing a number of signals (from stereo to mono) phase cancellations can be made more apparent and evident through a change in the quality of the sound. Phasing is basically the result of comb-filtering - effectively and addition of a delay copy of the sound to itself (except for polarity reversal where the results can be ...


2

Simply by putting them to edit sound. If they're smart, they'll develop their workflow, because inefficient use of the mouse and the keyboard and doing repetitive control movements and tasks eventually leads to frustation. At least I hope so.


2

Depends on your interests. Game mods are pretty easy to find and join, because you can do that using the internet. There are also a few sites where you might look for short film projects. It might not be useful to work on sound libraries though, unless you're particularly interested in them or have ideas for something extraordinary, because you'd be spending ...


2

Using stock sounds, because they're cheap and (often, sometimes) better what one could've possibly got otherwise.


2

On one project I wanted some howling wind fx......spent weeks trying to record and nothing was working. In frustration one day I went into the studio with a mic and spent twenty minutes blowing and howling....I'm sure I don't have to tell you what made it into the final cut.


2

My answer would be something along the lines of the first answer you got given but I would also like to recommend the D.Ramirez tutorials for dealing with electronic music workflow. They are freely available on youtube at He deals with a lot of mixing issues and it might help you get some of the "approach" to making ...


2

Apart from regular tools (DAW, audio editor etc...), it is a common thing for a sound designer-composer to learn/use programming tools (like Unity or FMOD) to be able to implement-test audio myself during the development? It's not common, because game (and sound) programming requires a certain level of experience in programming to make the ...


2

If I were you I'd go ahead and take the college course. A lot of the stuff you learn will apply both to digital and analogue, when it comes to things like mic selection and placement, equalizing and mixing. One thing they probably won't teach you is how to record on tape at an optimal level to minimize tape hiss, and how to calibrate tape machines, but that'...


2

There are a lot of elements that go into creating electronic music of any modern style of music. This includes: Writing Recording Learning Software Mixing Mastering Within all of these there is a ton of knowledge and experience that you need to acquire before you are able to produce something that people other than yourself will think is great music. ...


1

Converting a guitar or any instrument for that matter from audio to midi is quite a difficult task. The solution you are looking for would best be suited with the game Rocksmith where they've done all the work of figuring out if you've played the right notes. It teaches guitar fairly well. The only downside is that if they don't have the song you want to ...


1

Before going to college for it, I'd first see if you can find any studios you could intern at. It would be far more valuable experience with less cost. College is good for learning sound theory, but the nuts and bolts skills of mixing and recording are picked up through practice, not classrooms. As far as digital vs analog. I'd suggest learning on ...


1

Groove3.com has a wealth of tutorials on production, software, recording, mixing and so forth. You can purchase tutorials as a package ala carte or pay for a monthly subscription and have unlimited access to all of their content. I've used their resources in the past and while the ala carte price is a bit high the quality of their videos is some of the ...


1

Skarik's tips are good, but I would like to add: Practice and play with your instruments and write music (even short compositions or loops). In synths practice means really exhausting the synth's features so you know what it's composed of and form a sense of its "tonal range", so to speak. While other resources may give you tips about different things that ...


1

Hi Akachi, welcome to SSD! This site is more focused on film, computer game and theatre sound design, rather than the 'synth programming' type of sound design. However, there are many in this great community who also dabble in music, and use synths regularly in their work, so you should hopefully still get some good answers! I myself would point you ...


1

As someone new to the wild and--I feel--doing alright in the industry for how long I've been at it, my mentors have been absolutely invaluable. Without mentoring I'd have fewer jobs, my improvement and learning would stagnate, and I'm sure I'd be simply having less fun with it and wasting way more time.


1

Today's world is more connected (the internet etc.) so that it's not necessary anymore to seek mentoring in order to understand or practice something, because there are other ways for finding information and collaborating. Gaining and seeking mentorship can however serve an important step into meeting the today's professionals and businesses and learning ...


1

I think there are two types of phasing errors in aesthetic sound (i.e. this is not a definition in sound physics). 1) You sum one signal to another and hear that it affects something in the original signal negatively (e.g. some bass or other frequencies cancel out). When it happens to bassy sounds, it can sound like the sound "loses its power" or "punch". ...


1

I would stay off the smart tool, I know editors that use it and it makes them slow. Command 1-6 is a good easy hot key that would get the fingers used to quick keys faster. But I mean if it's your thing, then keep doing it. Also I like to add an apple S to the end of every combo stroke ;) Theres nothing like being able to move around with out a mouse, plus ...


1

i'd have them do all of their sessions for a week without a mouse. then after that i'd have them build quick keys for the more common tasks. that'd do it. :)


1

I think, like everything, the best way to go is to start from basic things - read manual, memorize keyboard shortcuts, and stuff like that. And - practice.


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