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10

Whichever app you use, you'll want to line them up and then invert the phase on one of them. Depending on how identical, and how they were made, it might easy to line them up and get an accurate result, otherwise you'll have to spend some time trying to line it up as best you can by zooming in on the samples. The idea being that if you have two things that ...


7

First off, your understanding of the perception of directionality is a little flawed. Yes, "Interaural Time Difference" (ITD) affects our ability to localize, but so does "Interaural Level Difference" (ILD). Our brain makes use of both, because each lose effectiveness outside of certain frequency ranges. We need both mechanisms to localize across the ...


4

Beating will always be there whenever there are two or more signals close in frequency but there are a few things that may help, depending on the synthesizer. All options will make it sound different but that is a trade off you can't really get away from... The reason these sounds stick out is actually because of the beating. More unison voices. The more ...


4

Phase cancellation is a common cause of confusion for many audio professionals, sometimes this is caused by a channel becoming inverted for some reason. Maybe this answer can help you, and other people reading this, to identify, or eliminate this type of phase cancellation as the cause of a problem. I've analysed the audio from the video and have come to a ...


4

I guess is not done often because mono compatibility concerns. Delay introduces all sort of phase issues. Mono is important in broadcast.


3

Having listened to mentioned in comments - the effect doesn't come in at the 49s mark, it's there right from the start. It is definitely a phase issue - but I'm not sure what's causing it. If you've eliminated the potential physical issues as described by Joel, than what remains is a routing issue. I'm going to take a ...


3

As already mentioned above, when summing a number of signals (from stereo to mono) phase cancellations can be made more apparent and evident through a change in the quality of the sound. Phasing is basically the result of comb-filtering - effectively and addition of a delay copy of the sound to itself (except for polarity reversal where the results can be ...


3

I dug a up thesis on the topic, On the contribution of temporal and spatial cues to the perceptual organization of concurrent sounds (link). From scanning section 1.2 Temporal cues, there are at least three factors involved, namely attack shape, volume, and onset time. There's probably a frequency content dependency as well (i.e subbass/kick combos can ...


2

This might be due to a phase problem, With your headphones and speakers the audio source is still really near so you fully enjoy the space emulation without loosing level. When you are far from your speakers a lots of frequencies might be cancelled and impossible for you to hear. The 3rd voice (man) is Ok other voices have a bad phase. Try to switch the ...


2

No. In fact when using EQ to enhance the tone of a track or fix problems with the track sitting in the mix, the phase shift is often part of the beneficial sonic change created by the EQ. In a live situation, the phase shift caused by EQ can actually provide more gain before feedback. Phase linear digital EQs can actually sound a little strange becuase the ...


2

Yeah it would appear to work that way, but the math reveals something else: You have two channels, Left and Right, and you invert one, that is flip the sign on one channel and mix* them: Left + (- Right), or simply: L - R. What you are doing here is essentially isolating the side channel. What was equal in both channels is now removed. What is different ...


2

take the headphones off and everything goes back to the way it should be...


1

I'll start with "I don't know & I've never tried it." Famously, Dave Stewart & Annie Lennox used to do her vocals on a hand-held SM58 in the control room with the phase of one monitor inverted, theoretically creating a null-space in the middle of the room. All well & good, but I've actually seen video of her putting vox down & she doesn't ...


1

Glad the OP is no longer having the problem, but I am very confident I hear the artifacts of a noise reduction plugin all over this YouTube recording. Coupled with a considerable amount of ambient room noise from the mic not being close enough to the person speaking, NR will cause exactly this kind of result when the settings are too aggressive or drastic. ...


1

FINALLY! I found this in the Audacity docs, and this part of it: Right-click once again over the required input device, click Properties then click the Advanced tab. Set Default Format to mono or stereo to match with the number of "recording channels" in Audacity's Device Toolbar or the Devices tab of Audacity Preferences (Audio I/O tab in legacy Audacity ...


1

Most likely there is a fault with your recording set up or microphone. The 'Mars effect' might actually be caused by a low frequency vibration that is getting into the mic, possibly from the computer or fan somewhere. It may cause some modulation on the signal depending on how loud it is, some structural vibrations from a desk can be quite loud. Try ...


1

I think there are two types of phasing errors in aesthetic sound (i.e. this is not a definition in sound physics). 1) You sum one signal to another and hear that it affects something in the original signal negatively (e.g. some bass or other frequencies cancel out). When it happens to bassy sounds, it can sound like the sound "loses its power" or "punch". ...


1

The phase characteristic of a sweep signal is linear, starting from 0 and increasing over time up to 2*Pi. For a very clear explanation of this, I suggest you see the paper Transfer-Function Measurement with Sweeps from Swen Müller and Paulo Massarani. If you use a sweep signal to measure an impulse response, the phase curve will have to be compared to ...


1

Vertical asymmetry's not a problem; likely just a product of the phase relationships between the superimposed sounds. There are ways of rectifying it (google phase rotator plugins) but it's no harm. It's not DC offset - the entire waveform, including the silence at the beginning/end, would be shifted vertically one way or the other away from the infinity ...


1

Well if your mic is static, point it away from the speakers and you should be good.....not meaning to dismiss your question but most real world situations call for vocal mics that are in constant motion as among your hottest items onstage. All the movement means a phase-based solution is impossible. I'm also not at all convinced that when feedback occurs,...


1

What you actually need here isn't a "phase aligner", it is an automixing solution like the Dugan automixer. This is built in to some of the higher-end recorders like the Sound Devices 788T or 688T but is also available as a plugin - I believe that Waves supply a Dugan automixer. An automixer has the ability to automatically manage the gain of a suite of ...


1

Perhaps it's worth trying the demo of Wave-arts Panorama 5. It uses the HRTF technique which Shaun describes plus what it calls "acoustic environment modeling". I've been meaning to give it a try myself. I think this technique is computationally too expensive to replace conventional panning on every track of your Daw, and probably less useful for music based ...


1

georgi answer is great, but it might simply be a YouTube issue. This happens often. Just recently, a friend of mine uploaded a video to it and L and R were switched!


1

Try a demo of Izotope 5 with new Meter Bridge in full screen mode. Has a phase meter amongst overs you can view in full screen.


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