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For games you can consider joining a game development team/company instead of enrolling in the university. Choose small ones so you can be directly involving and talking with senior sound designers there.


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In terms of theory, the bible for electronics (and also the book I'd recommend) is The Art Of Electronics. It's big, covers most of the important aspects for sound engineering and is nicely written. It will address all information you need in terms of physics, all electricity and electronics-specific terminology, and much more. Besides that, I'd second ...


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No, unless you plan on programming DAW software, Computer Science is of almost no benefit at all. They are not even remotely similar fields. I say this as someone who studied Computer Science and Electronic Media, Arts and Communications as a dual major in college. One major was all my math and science courses, the other was all my humanities and social ...


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I am a 18 years old female french student in audio engineering, and well... We girls aren't so numerous (we are something like 10 for 180 students). For my part, I want to work for live performance, music tours, festivals, that kind of things ^^ But I actually noted most of the girls actually in sound design for cinema, or as sound editors, for TV or for ...


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Have you looked into Iain McGregor's course at Edinburgh Napier University, UK? Although he is listed as a lecturer conducting research into sound design and listening, there may be other courses offered alongside that fit your needs: https://www.napier.ac.uk/people/iain-mcgregor Here in the USA, I can recommend the Music Production and Engineering program ...


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I currently go to the undergrad program at SCAD. Besides the faculty and classes, it's a great place to network with other art majors. Because we're in high demand, you often times get the pick of the litter working on animations, films, motion media, ect. For a number of alumni, they've gotten a lot of jobs from their SCAD connections The Master's ...


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NFTS is the best option in greater london. Avoid sound art courses.


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This is one of the best books published on the basics of Electronics. It is straight and to the point and is written in a way that makes it easy to grasp concepts for beginners. I posted the link below. I used this book to learn the basic concepts of Electronics in just one months time. Best of Luck! Getting Started in Electronics -Krux


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I'd look into getting an electronics circuit simulator as well. I gather LTSpice is free and people use it: http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/ I studied this in college. There's a lot of physics and math (including complex numbers) to it, but many concepts translate well in audio, plus you get an instant grasp of anything that has a signal flow to ...


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Back in the dim and distant past when I used to teach electronics I would recommend the following book to my first year students: Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications by Thomas L Floyd This covers the theory from the basics although you'll need to practice the practical side in conjunction with the theory. If you have no ...


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I'm not sure which are the best universities to consider. I'd say none, because I think most formal courses in sound are either about studying trivial BS or a valuable business for its staff, or both. You can do so much more, if you just have a look and a go at it yourself, because there's really nothing preventing one from self-studying and it's also a ...


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An interesting thread! I'm a female composer in the UK and also do sound design as part of my compositional work. In fact, a lot of my work is hard to categorise as music or sound design - it lives on the cusp of the two. I've worked for theatre, musical performances and museums. I've always been a sound designer/composer, ever since I was a kid in the ...


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