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7

There are hundreds of fields related to sound. I'll try to give a broad overview by breaking it down into the following categories: media production, event production, broadcast, design and engineering, and scholarship. There are some medical applications of sound that could be considered separate from those categories but normally one would approach those ...


5

To which I reply, "Well yes, I was responsible for all of the sound of the films that I've worked on and have done the dialog edit on every film I have a sound supervisor credit on." There are a number of times though that I haven't heard anything back when I send in a resume Herein lies the problem, as I see it. The one major part you omitted, in my ...


4

I am thrilled to have this community and I have learned so much from so many questions and answers here. The previous responses touch on many great answers and I agree with them all. But, to me, the most important things that I have taken to heart from SSD are two concepts underlying the whole board that are constantly reinforced. “There are naive ...


4

First of all, avoid just adding people randomly and pitching to them. This not too subtle approach will definitely yield zero results. And it's against website policies. You can join various groups and contribute with insight, however. That's where you make useful connections with whom you can discuss possible work later on. I can't say I found jobs ...


4

Tough situation, but one we've all grabbled with at some point. Use your downtime wisely,if you commute via public transport, read books, sound mags, get that knowledge in. If you drive, listen to podcasts, or even rip youtube videos and convert to audio. Like a language, if you don't immerse yourself in it, you'll lose your edge. This doesn't get you a ...


4

Some links: http://www.jetstreaming.org/2011/09/30/selling-sound-effects-how-to/ How to make money with sound design. This is your competition: http://www.sounddogs.com/ http://www.soundrangers.com/ http://www.airbornesound.com/ http://designingsound.org/sfx-independence/ http://www.sound-ideas.com/ http://www.pond5.com/sound-effects/1/*.html http://www....


3

I moved to LA a little over a year ago and used linkedin to have my friends introduce me to folks they know in LA. It really helped me find friends and connections. Many did lead to work as well. I think the trick is to make your goal just getting to know folks and to learn from them, share knowledge with them, and garner advice. You can't roll up on a ...


3

Amateurs seek praise. Professionals look for critique. also: stop looking at the world through that tiny screen on your phone. Real life is super HD, so go outside and play! also: every task requires or can benefit from creativity, so practice being creative. also: get enough sleep, eat right, exercise.


2

It's a good question, and I hope more people will answer. Of course there's tons of useful stuff on SSD so it's difficult to choose! I guess sometimes you read something which totally changes your thought process in a particular area, gives you a completely different angle on a problem. I think these are the real gems - not learning a new keyboard shortcut (...


2

Don't give up. And perhaps find a position at a sound facility that may not be sound related. You need to find a community or mentors. Even if you are a scheduler or a sales guy, you can make connections, learn, and show initiative while still paying the rent. I have even taught classes at the company gym just to have the freedom of an employee pass and the ...


2

I was walking with a former composition instructor of mine and I asked him about career choices and being concerned about choosing the right path. He simply said: "You have to make a living and you have to make a life." He helped me put at ease the fact that you need to have both a good balance in life and an open mind to those career choices. There's no ...


2

Don't despair, we've all been there more or less. I had to work unrelated jobs for 6 years before I could build my own studio and transition to sound design. It has been crucial in my development as a person, and as Tim said, during these 6 years I found out that sound design is definitely the career I want for myself.


2

Keep calling and emailing, managers (mostly) love people who just show they're keen. With little experience, it already proves to them that you'll work hard. Keep Volunteering when you can.. even once a week if that's all the time you have.. Don't take no for an answer basically. After all, you're offering to work for free. Getting knocked back is ...


2

Don't overcut. It projects insecurity, slows down the mix and pisses everyone off. Do not cut three sounds where one sound will work. Don't waste time manipulating the wrong sound trying to make it work. Find the right sound.


1

Very early on in my career I was tasked with editing a teaser for a movie. It was really a simple piece and I was a little stumped as to what to do. My boss just told me to have fun with it and see what happens. After I cleaned up the dialogue that was sent to me I started on the SFX. I stayed up all night and cut a pretty full soundtrack for the teaser ...


1

Great question! "Everything in good time, Arnoud" was one of the best one liners i've ever received/heard in first person. It was by our head of department at art school. Context: I was graduated and worrying about being able to fulfill my ambitions and taking the right choices. Like george hufnagi (great surname!), it put me at ease and it made me realize ...


1

The one thing which has stuck with me and resonated was that a well-regarded Sound Supervisor told me that (I'm paraphrasing) "it doesn't matter if it's the smallest short film or a biggest feature, treat everything you do like it's going to win the Academy Award". At first glance it may seem shallow. However this was told to me in the vain and context ...


1

I would "forget" the public job advertisements and contact people directly. Even visit the studios directly, if possible. I believe that many people watch those public job postings, so they will get loads of applications, which isn't a particularly good situation, neither for the recruiter, nor the applicant. Of course contacting people directly just because ...


1

Go where the work is. Get any job you can at a studio or sound house even if it's not the job you want. I have seen many people make lateral moves. From driver to editor, assistant to editor, techie to editor, library to editor ... I started as a driver/apprentice. You need to get your foot in the door. You will meet people and you will hopefully impress ...


1

Most people don't make it full-time ever. Or if they make, it's a very long, stubborn and incremental process. Basically, one sticks to it for as long as it takes until one has been in the field long enough to be considered "established" (i.e. this guy/gal is really about doing sound). I think it's also a said that most (at least interesting and changing) ...


1

Get a job. Echoing what Dave said, the craft is not really the difficult part of this business, it's the business. If you're thinking of doing sound design for longer as your main pursuit, then you need to find someone or something that's willing to pay for your services and continue to look for opportunities, because many projects are temporary. I.e. you ...


1

I mean, your demo material is really pretty terrific man. Start seeking some full scale and/or short films or start searching out some game devs if that's a path you want to pursue. It looks like you have the technical end of it together, the business end of it is sort of the hard part. In Philadephia, we have a film office that will occasionally host panels ...


1

I recommend this thread: Self-promotion advice Particularly because my answer to your question would be exactly the way I answered this one. Do your best work, always, and the work will promote itself and open doors for you. It's about building credibility. In brief, this is how I have begun to find my success in weaving through the industry (I say begun ...


1

If there are any local film, animation, or art schools, hang out there, get to know the students, and work on their films. There's usually lots of potential smallish projects coming from there, and since they're still learning it's a great way for you to get your feet wet. It's also a first step towards establishing connections once they graduate. You'll ...


1

I tend to agree with Mark's answer above. For me the two main aspect of Sound Design are the HOW and the WHY. Although the HOW questions can be very interesting and there are always new techniques to learn, as you gain more technical experience they tend to just build on known principles. However, the WHY seems to become more interesting. As a result, ...


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I like the fact that every problem creates numerous solutions. Its reassuring to know there's very little fixed ways, and everyone is willing to adapt and learn every day :)


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I think the best thing I've realized through SSD is how small the sound community really is. What I mean is when you think that tracking down industry pros for advice is really elusive, you see people on here holding regular conversations that are serious heavy hitters in the industry.


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