8

It's important to remember that a compressor does not make a sound louder, it reduces dynamic range. By bringing down the peak values, you give yourself more headroom to bring up the overall signal level (so the quieter parts can be louder). It is that "make up gain" which makes a sound louder, not the act of compression. The choice between using ...


5

Generally, you want to conceptualize this based on the reality of the situation you are trying to re-create. Firstly, shopping malls usually have crappy speakers, so imagine your sound being played through crappy speakers in a very large space, possibly with a fairly lengthy reverb time. Also, the speakers are often quite distant, so the ratio of direct ...


4

What you describe sounds like Buss/Master/Group Compression gone wrong. This effect sometimes appears when you have a compressor set to affect both the bass and the lead (via any of the Buss/Master/Group) When the bass hits the compressor the really lows(which consume a lot of space) instantly bring the threshold down and lower the volume of each other ...


3

I would recommend using square and saw waves detuned with some unison. I recommend you start with massive but serum is better if you have it. Modulate the wavetables in bend+/- or bend plus or bend - if you don't know what this is, read the manual or google it. This will add movement I recommend to synch this modulation. Add an extra oscillator to taste for ...


3

Only use balanced audio connections between several devices with their own power supply and grounding. If you are using decent equipment, chances are that they already have balanced line input/outputs with TRS 1/4" connectors (quarter inch jacks in tip-ring-shield configuration). If you connect those with mono cables, namely with TS plugs (tip-shield), the ...


2

There are several factors here, and not all may apply to your situation. ReBirth is a really good simulation of 808s, 909s, and 303s, but they are a simulation of ideal versions of them. Your hardware setup is going to invariably differ to some degree. You do state that when you match the settings in ReBirth with your hardware, it sounds "good". This would ...


2

If you are willing to pay a little fee you could commission a recording. I haven't use the service before but I came across this service from the production of a video I saw. http://voicebunny.com


2

My answer would be something along the lines of the first answer you got given but I would also like to recommend the D.Ramirez tutorials for dealing with electronic music workflow. They are freely available on youtube at He deals with a lot of mixing issues and it might help you get some of the "approach" to making ...


2

Warping acapellas can be a little difficult because you don't have an obvious rhythmic reference like drums. Ableton's warping interface is based on placing markers within a recording, and stretching them along a time ruler. You are saying "this part I have marked should be at this point in musical time." So not seconds, but measures and beats and ...


2

The point of compression is to remove dynamic range, or the perceived volume difference between the 'loud' parts and the 'quiet' parts. It squashes the loud parts down to be the same volume as the quiet parts, then you boost the entire thing back to normal volume. Now, based on that description, should you use compression? Are some parts of a track ...


2

I'm honestly not sure what you are asking here. Compression does not increase the "volume" of a signal, it decreases it. Compression makes a quiet portion of the sounds louder relative to a louder portion by reducing the signal strength when the signal strength is high. Often a gain is applied after compression to keep the signal strength up, but this ...


2

There are a lot of elements that go into creating electronic music of any modern style of music. This includes: Writing Recording Learning Software Mixing Mastering Within all of these there is a ton of knowledge and experience that you need to acquire before you are able to produce something that people other than yourself will think is great music. ...


2

Dave's answer is correct, However, in the context of FL Studio and electronic music in general these steps are much more intermingled...for example, if a shuddering kick drum is an important element in your track you may want to work on the filters, reverb, compression, saturation, for that while still sketching out other elements, so you will get a better ...


2

To sum up the 3 general steps you have listed (Lets use a rock band as an example) 1. Make Song (Record Initial Tracks): This is typically the stage where the audio is actually recorded and the sampled/synthesized tracks are created. This is the stage that occurs in what most people call a "Recording Studio". In keeping with our example this is the stage ...


2

Warning: Brutal honesty ahead... If you 'never end up doing anything', how do you think other people can help you? For starters, just start making stuff. It doesn't matter what. I started out with just clicking stuff and responding to the way it sounded. That was 20 years ago.. I still do that. Define (for yourself) what is 'interesting'. Try to make it ...


2

That sound is not very complex...and certainly achievable. When emulating any synth sound, it will be a lot of trial and error tweaking. But here are some obvious facts for a starting point. The pitch is sweeping upwards. So first off you need to be using a synth that can facilitate that....most can. Use an ADSR envelope routed to control the pitch of ...


2

Headphones are not really optional for recording vocals, because you don't want the backing tracks to bleed into the vocal mic (usually). Also, you should look at some kind of acoustic treatment. The best thing to have would be a walk-in closet where you can set up the vocal mic and headphones and put up some treatment to diffuse and absorb sound to reduce ...


2

Firstly, align your mixing environment to a technical level using pink noise and a sound pressure level meter. There are various articles on how to do this .... for example. Secondly, listen to lots of reference material at a set known mix volume level and train your ears to get used to hearing familiar material in this environment. Then when you know ...


2

While i agree with Tetsujin I'd like to take the chance and maybe help you. Let me first point out a couple of things: I'm self taught and I believe I'm very good at it. You are 22 years old. I would suggest taking a step back but not too far. I'm not criticizing you and i do hope you are as good & talented as you say you are but sound is a thing ...


2

For me it sounds like he's applying FL Studio's Vocodex plugin. Although I'm not a specialist using this I know that you can do some insane stuff with it utilizing a "carry"-layer and a sound-layer so that the sound from the sound layer is vocoded using the MIDI-information coming from the carry-layer. Two really good tutorials on how to use the plugin ...


2

I doubt any two people do it the same way, but ultimately it comes down to practise, practise & more practise. Remember the old adage, that it takes 10,000 hours to become expert at something. [That's 5 years, working a 40-hour week] Personally, I spent 7 years as a jobbing musician before ever touching a recording desk. I then started with what at the ...


1

As a qualitative approach to this question, I think you should look at it from a limiting point of view if you're trying to avoid clipping. This will allow you to keep the raw signal uncompressed and also control the peaking. I agree with @Shaun Farley about parallel compression, you should check out what it can do. Bare in mind its a little bit of black ...


1

Warrior Bob covers the basics pretty well...Music theory comes in handy even in the highly automated world of music production today. I'll just add, to my ears, TAKE it apart is the beginning of one bar and STITCH me together is the beginning of the next. Put a warp marker on TAKE and STITCH and stretch the space between them so that it covers one bar. ...


1

I assume wanted to ask if it makes sense to use compression while writing a piece of music. You can use compression on your individual tracks (channel-strips) when the signal is too dynamic compared to the rest of the tracks, if you want to emphasize the attack phase of drums, bring vocals closer and so on. But I strongly recommend not to use a compressor on ...


1

Combination? It's nothing more than a pulse-wave, if anything plain through a high-pass filter. From the thin characteristics and fluxing pitch/overtones (which is NOT a good thing in a pitch-pipe) I guess this comes from an old, yet pretty cheap and not yet warmed up analogue synth. And with basic fades in the beginning and end, though the change in ...


1

Groove3.com has a wealth of tutorials on production, software, recording, mixing and so forth. You can purchase tutorials as a package ala carte or pay for a monthly subscription and have unlimited access to all of their content. I've used their resources in the past and while the ala carte price is a bit high the quality of their videos is some of the ...


1

Most people can't actually hear a pure 16.35Hz signal it is quite literally sub-sonic, also the lowest note on a piano is A0 at 27.50Hz which as a pure sine wave is also likely to be inaudible. What most people are hearing are the series of harmonics that occur when the string is struck. So if you combine sine waves of 27.5, 55.0, 82.5, 110.0, 137.5, and ...


1

Yes, as Tetsujin states - our perception is different at different frequencies and different volumes. The Fletcher Munson curve is one equal loudness contour. Implementing a crudely drawn version of the curve should help, and as you have a single frequency you can easily scan over the curve using a lookup table or similar to adjust volume (not sure what the ...


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