7

There's really no such thing as MIDI Synthesis. Synthesis is the process by which sounds are 'synthesised' using various modulation and generation techniques. MIDI is the "Musical Instrument Digital Interface" and is a protocol by which electronic music instruments can pass control and note information. MIDI is only interested in sending and receiving ...


3

The "morph" you're describing is known as (both) spectral cross-modulation, and spectral convolution. From what i've read in your question, I gather you're interested in essentially crossfading the two sounds together, but in the frequency domain not the time domain? If that's indeed the case then there are a few ways to go about doing this. you can either ...


3

If the wire is to actually break, I'd go for a guitar string; a thin one, maybe an 8. Tie it off to something either resonant or not, depending on whether your scenario is indoors or out, then just pull it with one finger til it breaks - wear a glove or it'll hurt your finger ;) If it isn't to break, just twang, then you save the cost of more guitar ...


3

What I'm wondering is: how many variations of each should I have? 3-8 variations (or as a rule of thumb, 5 variations) depending on the speed of movement (at faster speeds you tend to pick up repetition more easily). The pitch variation (and volume) that you can enable in game engines or audio middleware tools often does the rest. do I need to have ...


2

Apart from regular tools (DAW, audio editor etc...), it is a common thing for a sound designer-composer to learn/use programming tools (like Unity or FMOD) to be able to implement-test audio myself during the development? It's not common, because game (and sound) programming requires a certain level of experience in programming to make the ...


2

For games you can consider joining a game development team/company instead of enrolling in the university. Choose small ones so you can be directly involving and talking with senior sound designers there.


2

I will give you some feedback! I like long and constructive feedback so I will give that to you. One of the things I really liked was that bottle smash, really good job on that sound effect. I also like the underlying music tones at the beginning and the end of the trailer. Things I didn't care for is how everything sounded very close and could easily tell ...


2

The Jedi lightsabres are tuned in A and the Sith ones are tuned in G. The 2 semitone pitch difference is present to make the duels seem more sinister and tense. It works too, if you pitched them both the same there would be a noticable difference in dramatic effect.


2

Dalv is right that you would ideally bring the mic closer to the source you want to record, although that isn't technically what signal-to-noise means. Good mic placement is going to have the most advantageous effects for your situation. Also, that mic has a cardioid polar pattern which means that it picks up in a spherical orientation around the front and a ...


2

Given that your input file is 44.1 kHz/32 bits/stereo file and your desired output is 22.050 kHz/8 bits/mono file, there are actually three processes that are involved in your request : resampling quantization down mixing stereo to mono Notice that given the potentially audibly important changes that these processes can produce, you might have asked the ...


2

I would start off by learning wwise. Audiokinetic has a lot of tutorials and sample projects available. Beyond that, I would download Unity or UE4 and start following tutorials on implementation. Knowing how game audio works and is implemented will help you begin to sound design for the game and the players experience. Further, when you are playing games, ...


1

When you quantize the sound down to 8-bit, there are different algorithms you can use to get there. The simplest-to-implement, naïve algorithm is nearest neighbor. This is basically just rounding the amplitude of the signal at each sample to the closest 8-bit value. Imagine taking a black and white photograph and using a photocopier from 30 years ago: ...


1

It can be, yes. The only way you'd be legally allowed to manipulate or change someone else's MIDI is if they gave you permission to do so.


1

The Binary Revolution Stream format uses ADPCM to represent audio data. ADPCM uses a lossless compression algorithm. ADPCM is an adaptation of DPCM, which is in turn, an adaptation of PCM. Differential pulse-code modulation (DPCM), like PCM, uses a cyclic pulse to sample a given waveform at discrete intervals. But instead of simply quantizing and storing ...


1

From a quick read through several of the links above, I believe it's most appropriate to call BRSTM a lossless audio format. For a start, let's define "lossless audio": For simplicity's sake, a lossless audio format is an audio format where the bits going in (during recording) match the bits going out (during playback). To explain ADPCM (and I'm by no ...


1

Snag an sm58 or anything of similar type. I've seen a bunch of tutorials where the instructor has one hooked up to a mic stand and right near their mouth. Works great. Obviously the easier thing would be to get one with a usb out. Something like this http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=751977&gclid=CjwKEAjw6_q5BRCOp-Hj-...


1

The best skill for audio programmers would be - strong coding skills (i guess C++ syntax) and good knowledge of middleware such as Wwise and FMod. Knowledge of audio editors (SoundForge, Audio Audition, Audacity etc.) and DAWs (ProTools, Logic, Cubase etc.) is most of the a time a well recieved plus Modern audio technique can also be useful like - using ...


1

I would mix the tracks on Studio Monitors, but reference it with other game Dialogs, then check on the laptop and make the proper changes. In doubt always reference. Grab 2 or 3 other tracks you like how they sound and mess with an EQ and a Compressor till you get there. Use an EQ match plugin if you need. Another tip would be to increase the lows of the ...


1

You could use a time-stretching function (such as what's built in to REAPER, Logic, or ProTools) to line up the transients of the two audio samples, and then play around with mixing and use a vocoder to apply the spectrum from one to another.


1

I'm not sure which are the best universities to consider. I'd say none, because I think most formal courses in sound are either about studying trivial BS or a valuable business for its staff, or both. You can do so much more, if you just have a look and a go at it yourself, because there's really nothing preventing one from self-studying and it's also a ...


1

Effects are spliced into your recordings. They are supposed to be clearly audible and thus come with considerable gain. If they come with a non-trivial noise floor, this noise floor will be spliced in as well and will define start/end of the effect in a manner separate and distinguishable from the signal itself. The kind of signal you describe is more of ...


1

Sorry to say there is no magic plugin that will achieve this effect for you. The majority of great creature vocals are painstakingly crafted by sound designers for days or even weeks. One insight I can offer is that layering sounds is your friend. From human to bat (or vice versa) you need to weave textures from each character in and out over time, paying ...


1

I think editing and maybe some pitch/formant shifting could get you pretty far. Sometimes convolution can work to get the tone changing to more of a Bat from human. Izotope IRIS would seem like a good tool to try also, I've never used it but it seems like this is exactly what it's supposed to help you with. I would err on the side of natural since you ...


1

Rebal Instinct, I wonder if Dehumaniser would be of use to you? It's an app specifically designed to morph human into monster sounds and back again: http://dehumaniser.com/ That being said, I'd love to see more modern and accessible morph plugins. Aside from Prosonic/Zynaptiq Morph (which is ancient and hasn't had a major update in years) and Symbolc Sound ...


1

Two guesses at methods - I've never actually tried either of these myself... Using an envelope follower to raise the volume of the scream dynamically with the speech. Using VocAlign to try matching the scream to the speech, ADR-style. For both, then perhaps just cross-fading one into the other, if that's the desired final effect.


1

Maybe it's the phrasing or the cadence of speech? Sometimes that's what makes the transition sound wrong. Both "voices" should be performed similarly to seamlessly morph into the other.


1

You'll need to modify the gain structure by compression/limiting or manual volume automation. You could use a brickwall limiter, but make sure by listening and comparing that it actually results to increased volume and not decreased volume as crushing dynamics can result in either one depending on how the limiting is done or how the sound reacts to it. You ...


1

Have the sound effect files been normalised? If not, I'd start by normalising them as this operation will analyse the file, find the highest level and will then increase the level of all samples so that the highest value sits at 0dB. If you are not familiar with audio software I'd suggest downloading something like Audacity and then look at the manual for ...


1

Here is some useful information about designing interface sounds for a casual game. https://sound.stackexchange.com/a/11608/1225


1

I've been a member for around 4 or 5 years now and live in Germany but used to travel regularly to Los Angeles for business. From my experience they do offer some great events (or at least did, last one I attended was at TODD AO in Santa Monica in 2008 or 2009 I think, no idea about more recent ones) and it does connect you with people but most of these ...


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