7

There's really no such thing as MIDI Synthesis. Synthesis is the process by which sounds are 'synthesised' using various modulation and generation techniques. MIDI is the "Musical Instrument Digital Interface" and is a protocol by which electronic music instruments can pass control and note information. MIDI is only interested in sending and receiving ...


6

the few things that I run into when doing forcefields: 1) electrical forcefields are going to sound different than magical forcefields. Be sure to know what's causing the FF story-wise as you pull together your source elements. 2) forcefields tend to be tricky to mix unless you plan the frequency spectrums out carefully. Its very easy to get caught up ...


6

It's a growing field of research and there's clearly much interest into procedural audio, because of its interactive/dynamic and synthesized nature. P.A. is mainly proposed to be a great solution for anything that's repetitive and for creating common "boilerplate" sounds such as footsteps and ambient noises that consume time, which the busy audio designer ...


5

Hi, AudioGaming developer here (which by the way is French, so please forgive my poor english skills) ! PA has been an ignored tool for a very long time, and because of that we sometimes have to struggle a bit against long-established habits, creation pipelines and existing content. But it really just is one more tool, not really designed to replace ...


4

Games testing is a really good way of learning about games development processes and realities. Even better if you can land a job as audio tester, you will get to work with the in-house audio tools and be in direct contact with the sound team. I started as a games tester myself and it's been invaluable experience. It's not a guaranteed path to becoming an ...


4

try this thread: Game Audio Culture


3

If you are interested in procedural audio, take some time to peruse Andy Farnell's website: http://obiwannabe.co.uk One of the best resources on the net. His book "Designing Sound" is also fantastic.


3

My thinking is: IF you have the means to support yourself for a while, focus solely on audio projects (indie games, post, personal sound design projects) and hold out for the full-on audio gigs. Testing is not a super direct route in. Audio testing maybe. However, if you need to pay bills in the meantime, you could probably do worse than a testing job in ...


3

I got my in through a combination of being a tester and knowing the right people. While I don't think it's necessarily the best way in any more you do gain a lot of knowledge of how development works that you won't learn anywhere else. Overall I always like working with people who have been testers since they know all sides of things. It will also make you ...


3

My understanding is that when an event is called all of the associated sound defs will also be loaded. The data then sticks around until you call freeEventData. support@fmod.org will typically reply to this kind of technical question pretty promptly.


3

You can get FMOD or Wwise for free and use their free tutorial's on YouTube, here's the ones I've watched for FMOD which are great. Another great resource would be to get The Game Audio Tutorial Book which covers UDK which is also a free software. Another good book would be The Complete Guide To Game Audio by Aaron Marks, I would recommend getting it once ...


3

@Melissa, What kind of game is it? The player perspective will definitely influence how you approach the skeleton audio. I assume as it is for mobile it will either be isometric, top-down or side scrolling? Secondly, is it real-time or turn based (like the might and magic games, for example?) or something else entirely? This needs to be considered, as a ...


3

Re-watch A Bug's Life for tons of ideas. If you can get the DVD, there's a whole track where it's SFX only: No dialogue, no music. Full of neat ideas there. Seem to remember that Ben Burtt used handcuff ratchets for the feet of the roach in Wall-E. Just some ideas of existing SFX to get you unblocked. Close-up, dainty, tight foley or SFX seem like they'd ...


3

Take an Unbreakable plastic comb (for your hair), bend the tines back with your thumb, and let them pop up one by one.


3

What I'm wondering is: how many variations of each should I have? 3-8 variations (or as a rule of thumb, 5 variations) depending on the speed of movement (at faster speeds you tend to pick up repetition more easily). The pitch variation (and volume) that you can enable in game engines or audio middleware tools often does the rest. do I need to have ...


3

The "morph" you're describing is known as (both) spectral cross-modulation, and spectral convolution. From what i've read in your question, I gather you're interested in essentially crossfading the two sounds together, but in the frequency domain not the time domain? If that's indeed the case then there are a few ways to go about doing this. you can either ...


3

If the wire is to actually break, I'd go for a guitar string; a thin one, maybe an 8. Tie it off to something either resonant or not, depending on whether your scenario is indoors or out, then just pull it with one finger til it breaks - wear a glove or it'll hurt your finger ;) If it isn't to break, just twang, then you save the cost of more guitar ...


2

1.how long have you been in the video games industry and how did you get started? started in 2004 designing, programming and doing sounds for Flash games. Currently work as Audio Lead at Remedy Entertainment. 2.what equipment do you use in the studio and for foley recordings? and what computer programmes and Middlware used? We outsource a lot of the the ...


2

Try taking any sort of electric hum or buzz and running it through a RTAS pitch shifter with a high feedback. The more you pitch it the more powerful the forcefield will sound.


2

Grm tools v3 work as Rtas, Vst and AU: they just work in Logic! BTW, just updated to v3.2 They're quite unique, but there are other interesting plugins to try: have a look at Michael Norris' SoundMagic Spectral suite http://www.michaelnorris.info/software/soundmagic-spectral.html Best Davide


2

You should be thinking about the CV perspective of things. Working in game-audio requries you to be competant with audio engines, game engines, audio production, audio glitch hunting/fixing etc. Whilst "Have a passion for gaming" will be on every job-listing you see for permanant vacancies and a role in gaming QA will certainly prove this, "a passion for ...


2

Absolutely yes. I've been testing for half a decade now, the past two years of which have been exclusively audio testing. About 18 months ago I started work as an embedded tester working side-by-side with the audio team at my studio. I got hooked up with a private office and a nice 5.1 system, wedged right in between five audio devs and the audio project ...


2

are the files already named, and the new ones you'll record will match them? If so, I'd suggest adding a sorting prefix before importing them into protools. something that if you sort alphabetically they'll all line up into the way you plan to record the new lines. You may want to break slightly away from the "single track" thing if your workflow will ...


2

http://www.wreckamovie.com/ http://www.moddb.com/forum/board/recruiting-resumes


2

Never heard of ADSPCM, but have heard of ADPCM. If that's the one you're referring to, it's a compressed (4bit) version of PCM. It's usually used for voice in phone systems because of the low frequency range. Good explanation here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/89879 best, Alex


2

ADPCM is used quite regularly in games, although it's usually applied in-engine not on the source file. That said its a little unusual for this form of compression to be used on all sound files. I'd check with the programmer on what engine/toolset you're using and do a little digging yourself. -A


2

Check out the Equator D5s. They just increased the price to 399, but that's still a screaming deal. http://www.equatoraudio.com/D5_Studio_Monitors_with_DSP_p/d5.htm


2

I might try a small (very) garden trow or small hand shovel in grass, time compressed and pitched up. Bugs usually get a "skittery" sound no matter what kind of feet they have. The time compressions will shorten it and make it a tiny tap. Good luck!


2

You could maybe try dropping small pasta shells or tapping your nails on a hard surface. If it's a cutesy kids thing I imagine something like a xylophone run would help soften the mood as the spider runs past as well.


2

Shepard's Tone Illusion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shepard_tone


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