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7

The purpose of a direct box is simply to take a quarter inch guitar line signal and convert it to a balanced signal that won't degrade over the longer run to the sound system. A DI doesn't do anything that can't be done with a decent recording interface since you aren't going a long distance with the signal. You are best off to get an audio interface that ...


6

That's still an EQ, you just cut the bands to -infinity. More specifically, you would want to use a shelf EQ if you have it. Also sometimes called high pass and low pass filters.


6

Click in the Step Sequencer (Channel Rack) channel with ALT pressed. That will open the new window without hiding the previous one. Cheers.


5

You can do a basic implementation manually in any daw: Copy the track Pan both tracks left and right respectively and symmetrically The dry channel should be around 18dB louder than the Haas channel Add a time delay of 13ms-~50ms to 'Haas' channel' Be careful how much Haas you use, it affects the tonality of the track when summed to mono. If you have ...


4

If your "VST" track just has MIDI data in it already (which is being sent to a VST), then you should be able to copy that MIDI data out just as you describe. If it isn't (say, it's got audio data that's just being processed by a VST) then there no universal way to do this, since MIDI is not audio. Some tools do exist that will attempt to transcribe note ...


4

You won't get quality for cheap... None of those options are really going to have the best audio quality. Options 1 and 3 both involve converting your guitar's output to 3.5mm and presumably using your computer's onboard line-in, which is, in all likelihood, not that great-sounding of an input. That leaves option 2, but super-inexpensive audio interfaces ...


4

Audio To Midi - Free plugin by Mind The Pressure. Translates audio to midi signal directly so it can be hooked up with any virtual instrument (direct download) WIDI Audio to MIDI - Not free. Somewhat similar to the above, but it has some stability problems.


4

I don't know if any of the following will work or not, but maybe worth an experiment. Try a delay of about 1/2 of a millisecond, if you have the capability, between the two channels, of the mono signal. The goal is for the delay to match the amount of time it takes a sound to travel from one ear to the other. I can't remember the exact number--something ...


4

A similar effect can be produced using an EQ alone. Boost the mids to the point that they are almost clipping and reduce the highs and lows. Many EQs come with a preset for this. If you put a small amount of distortion before and after the EQ it will improve the effect.


4

I don't believe there's a thing like "tape compression", there are certain things happening to the sound that we explain as "compression" but really it's a collection of non linear processes, such as slew rate, crossover distortion, transformer style distortion , noise enhancement at certain frequencies , harmonic content enrichment and goes on. You can try ...


3

Until the last year or so I ran my guitar (via effect pedal) straight into the line input jack. I was/am using a creative sound-blaster card which offers 2 x 1/4" inputs. I don't see any real problem with this at all if leads are fairly short. Folk say my stuff sounds good quality (Can't vouch for the singing though) Now I have a small Yamaha 10 channel ...


3

It depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you want to just create some chiptune like sounds then this can be done with virtually any synth by just using only one or two oscillators, little or no modulation, only simple effects and then putting it through a bit crusher to give you that 8-bit sound. If you want to create a true chiptune track you ...


3

http://www.plogue.com/products/chipsounds/ is probably your best bet. I've heard some people play with retro trackers as well (e.g. FamiTracker).


3

Okay - the one essential our core techy (my lead singer) has bought is a wide range of compressors. Maybe 12 high quality rack compressors now, and he swears by them - they make life a hell of a lot easier when recording, and they are independent of your DAW, which software compressors aren't. I wouldn't worry about effects until you either find one you '...


3

could you maybe use Soundflower to route the system audio into a vst compatible program? just an idea.


3

Tutorial Video on Cubase VST! Check out 3.20 - the Edit Instrument button is the button you want to press.


3

Another option is to look into Sonic Core's products. Originally, the PCI card-based hardware was developed by CreamWare, but Sonic Core acquired them, and developed the Xite series of hardware based on the original technology. The hardware can host Effects and Instrument (proprietary) plugins, which are actively developed (both commercially and through a ...


3

Go to Options -> General, there you need to disable "Auto select linked modules" option.


3

Vienna Ensemble Pro Take a look at Vienna Ensemble Pro (VEP, VEPro). There is a Master/Slave feature that let you process VST instruments (and ordinary VST effects) on other computers (and you can mix Macs and PCs). The master sends MIDI commands to the slave, and the slave returns the result samples. All through a plain cabled ethernet connection. Here ...


2

Following up from my previous answer, I have just seen this article and thought you might find in useful: http://www.musicradar.com/news/tech/9-of-the-best-chiptune-vst-plug-ins-554428 Hope this helps.


2

REAPER - http://www.reaper.fm/


2

FXpansion VST to AU Adapter is a commercial tool JVSTwRapper is free Both seem to work equally well


2

There is Freehaas. I'm not sure how successful it is in implementing the haas effect, buit provides thickness to my mixes when I use it, and it's intuitive and light.


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