5

shorts and a t shirt, to minimize clothing noise when doing a foot pass. clothing moves can be added separately. pants swishing noise can build up when doing multiple passes of feet.


5

A lot of Foley artists use sweat pants, soft clothes that don't make sound when rubbing together. Also take off any jewely, belts, etc.


5

My approach to this would be: Search for appropriate elevator sounds. Maybe you will find the perfect sound with everything you need in a library. If you do, then great. If not... Consider finding an elevator to record. There are still plenty of elevators like that around (at least here in the UK) if you know where to look. Hotels, restaurants and shops ...


5

For the sound of dog I actually normally just use a kind of heavy-duty gloves I've epoxy-glued paper-clips on. I was gonna try other things as well when it was still just gaffed on, like pieces of horn and different types of wood, but truth be told I found this configuration to be absolutely spot-on for what I needed instantly! For the sense of weight, I've ...


4

The basic principle is called double tracking. You can read a good introductory article here: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr09/articles/doubletracking.htm In the first example there is pitch difference and a strong spatial element being applied.


4

Well they are harsh sounds... First make sure that what you do as step number one is to control the source, change material (paper/board type, different pen or chalk etc) until you get a sound you really like. Authenticity is rarely important, fake it! Second, mic choice can go a long way, try a dynamic mic. Stay away from regular dialog/boom mics, use ...


4

To get rid of harshness at recording try the following: Record with a distance. Rarely do we hear a paper get torn from a distance of 20-30 cm. More so 50cm+++ Go off axis. This will get rid of directional and thus high frequency material a bit. Try DeEssers or Multiband Compressors to get rid of peaks in the 4000 and 8000 Hz region Use dynamic mics instead ...


4

It depends. If I know for sure there are no way anyone would see me, and I'm in my own studio - tee and boxers. In extreme cases also a thick Palestinian scarf (textured with skulls and crossbones for that extra audio push!) covering my mouth and nose to further reduce the risk of accidental breaths or such. But mostly I use a tee washed with a lot of ...


4

Usually the smaller more intimate sounds will provide the detail, so you'll have those larger, slower, heavier wave sounds as the body and you can provide movement and texture and detail with smaller splashes, sprays etc mixed in.


3

This question is a bit out of context on a sound design q&a site, but easy to answer. Whenever you re-encode an already encoded soundfile (mp3>export to mp3) you lose more 'sound' information. Look up 'lossy' and 'lossless encoding' on wikipedia and you'll understand it better. Oh and in general it's easier for us to answer if you include more details. ...


3

look into brands like microphone madness etc. sometimes they repackage quality omni capsules (e.g. sennheiser mke2) for a lot cheaper due to them being slightly mismatched, or otherwise failing QC. contact mics are another way to get some sounds - the character will be very specific and the cheaper the mics = the more EQ you'd need to apply, but the ...


3

Generally when recording you're looking for the best signal to noise ratio possible. If you record something too low then need to turn it up later in post, you're also going to be turning up all the unwanted noise. Personally I try to record as hot as possible without clipping or activating limiters. This may mean initially backing off the gain a little in ...


3

metal, glass, chimes, bells, that sort of thing. super high screechy stuff is the only stuff that really makes any sound up there. alternatively try contact mics and electrostatic mics


3

I wouldn't be afraid to use any good recording I made for whatever purposes I needed them. Some of the greatest and most award winning photography in the history of the medium is of people in great pain or distress. That the photographer captured and then released the images doesn't detract from the art of what that was or from what that photographer was ...


3

While everyone has provided some great answers so far regarding the recording of these harsh sounds, no one has mentioned another critical answer: Performance. If you're scribbling with the fury of a 5 year-old with a new set of crayons you're going to get some harshness, regardless of how you mic it.


3

Experimenting with a small hand fan can work maybe. And layering that with simple mechanical sounds can do the trick!


3

I'm not sure this qualifies as a full answer, but maybe a starting point... To really layer it up, you need to add variation to what is being recorded, so assuming you can get it a bit like a taiko to start with... Tuning Vary tuning between takes. Some phasing might be OK, but a whole swathe of very similar pitches won't sound as big as highly varied ...


3

I'm not too familiar with Garage Band or Logic (I'm a Windows Cubase user), but your best bet is to simply record a child, but I'm assuming that's not an option. You can use just about any DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) to record your voice and using a blend of pitch shifting (shifting the lead vocal an octave or two down) and combining the newly modified ...


3

To be honest any mic can do Foley, I've seen Foley done with an sm57 which is historically an instrument mic. Foley has much more to do with technique than what mic you are using, 80% of Foley is the art and creativity. I have done Foley with an SE1 mic which cost less than £100. As such in an emergency as long as your Foley technique is good, everything is ...


2

I think it's pretty obvious answer that to value a "rare" recording more than lives in danger would be a pretty dick thing to do. But no doubt that we/some tend to be dicks in many aspects, ignoring to help, when the loss or pain (which there always is) doesn't touch personally. The good way to go, in my opinion, would be to react like reporters/journalists....


2

I use exactly what your planing. I use two line audio cm3 with the kortwich connectors. In a ORTF Setup Which is a little Wider (21cm) than normal but it sounds very nicely. You can order the connectors at http://www.filmtontechnik.de/service.html or you can write them a email via mail@filmtontechnik.de There are very nice people in the Store in Berlin. I´m ...


2

To answer your first quesiton, very dense and thick foam (properly attached too to prevent vibration transference - as in, not just "set and forget" flopped ont top of the car) should do the trick. That's effectively what the Rycote rain covers are in a general sense - thick and dense over-sized foam to help absorb the rain drop sounds from transferring to ...


2

A decent quality standard mic for picking up speaking costs $100 or more. You are not going to find a good microphone that has sufficiently low levels of noise to get a good recording for $100. You will also likely have a problem finding a good, quiet environment to do the recording in unless you already have a sound proofed studio space. Recording quiet ...


2

For $100 you are really very limited. You can afford a cheap handheld recorder like the zoom H1 or possibly the tascam DR-05. These will work, but you will need to get the recorder fairly close to record quiet sources like you mention. You do get what you pay for with sound equipment, so don't expect miracles - you may get something useable for your purposes ...


2

One way to get a similar effect is by using a "handmade chorus effect". Send your vocals to 2 send channels. Delay one channel by around 10 ms, pan it to the left and pitch it up by around 8-12 cents (via pitch shifting plugin). Delay the other channel by around 20 ms, pan it to the right and pitch it down by 8-12 cents. Also increase this channels volume a ...


2

I've got an app in the iPad for that: Loopy Much more modern and convenient... The pedal is optional you just need your fingers =)


2

Create the engine mechanism using industrial motor sounds from a library. Look especially for engine start and engine stop sounds. These type of engine sounds usually come with a nice reverb because of the facility they were recorded in. It may help a natural feeling of a large building space. If the shot is very close for a reverb, you can also combine ...


2

My personal recommendation is to get a couple of mics so you have options that are task specific. A solid dynamic mic like the Sure sm57 is an industry standard for capturing everything from snare drums, to guitar amps, to bass amps. The advantage of a dynamic mic is the ability to capture sounds at high SPL that would destroy a condenser style mic. However ...


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