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4

I don't know about audio books, but this is a pretty "neat" book regarding the topic: http://www.synthesizer-cookbook.com/ Plenty of examples with precise "recipes" that you can copy and see what they're composed of. Working out those should give a better idea of how different styles of subtractive sounds can be made. Also, this video series: Intro To ...


4

Speaking of Star Wars, there is a great book out that goes through the sound effects (comes with a little audio player attached). Naturally called "the sounds of star wars", it talks about either how the sound was created or a little interesting story about the sound. And its always fun to listen to the sound effects in a raw sense (not as they are mixed ...


3

I did a year of acoustical consulting (architectural / noise control) before going back the more creative sound design route. The first book my old boss had me read was M. David Egan's Architectural Acoustics. Very easy to read, with good practical principles and illustrations, also some cultural case studies. Obviously geared toward architectural use, ...


3

Sonic Experience: A Guide to Everyday Sounds by Jean-Francois Augoyard and Henri Torgue is an excellent book that explains many sonic experiences and acoustic phenomena by going into the philosophy, aesthetics, cultural context, and psychoacoustics of sound without going into too much detail about the physics or math.


2

The most important thing to know about location sound isn't how to push buttons and faders, or really even how to use recorders. The single most important thing to know is how to use a microphone. If you don't know what various mics should sound like, in various conditions, it doesn't matter how you record it or what track it's on or what the level is, it ...


2

John Purcell's Dialogue Editing book covers this process in broad strokes from dailies -> printmasters. Very broad strokes, because all the ins and outs of dialogue/ADR editing alone would fill an Encyclopedia Brittancia set easily. But, it does offer a very well rounded and approachable introduction to dialogue editing, and where it sits within the entire ...


2

There's not really just one way to do this, there are practically as many ways as there are practitioners, possibly more as many of us tends to adopt to the project rather than always doing it the same way. As such, and due to the fact that it's a humongous field to cover, I don't think there are actual walk-throughs for this. What do exist though, is ...


2

Unfortunately I don't have a direct answer for you as far as reading sources are concerned. However in my own personal experience, I learned about rhythm and timing from back when I used to be a DJ at a winebar working with beat-matching vinyl and such. It gave my a very tactile, hands-on understanding of pitch, rhythm, and timing manipulation - and ...


2

A copy of the original Star Wars should do the trick. If it doesn't, have him watch WALL-E, Poltergeist, and Once Upon A Time in the West. All in one night. With a notepad.


2

kid needs a mic or a synth IMO. :) edit: pocketsynth! alt text http://images.junostatic.com/full/IS316391-01-01-BIG.jpg


2

Here are some popular and recommendable books regarding the topic: General/informative: M. Chion: Audio-Vision. On the analytical and "academic" side of sound's role in a visual medium (film). Very informative and interesting read. D. Sonnenschein: Sound Design. Has a more practical approach to the topic as it's written by a (film) sound designer himself. ...


2

He should definitely check out some of the Soundworks videos, and if he doesn't already have one, a portable recorder like a Zoom H4n would be a good investment. Also, remember you don't have to choose between being a sound designer and a musician - it's all sound. You can be both.


2

The question is a bit vague. There are lots of books about film, and quite a few books about film sound. But most won't mention any differences between Europe/US other than in anecdotal form. There really is no "magic" difference. The main differences between big "Hollywood blockbuster type" films and typical European films is budget, number of folks ...


1

what i found very useful is Syntorial, very awesome way to learn how to master synths


1

A huge amount of information can be bought from here: http://electronotes.netfirms.com but you will need to have a fair knowledge of analogue devices and circuit theory. You'll probably also have to rework the circuits with up to date components.


1

You might be able to find some of what you seek here or here or if you really like Bose stuff here and one more to the list here. All these links offer schematics which is all you need to start building as for comprehensive literature this may be a nice guide (but i have never read it so I don't know). Just a word from an electrical engineer. Being a ...


1

http://www.amazon.ca/Practical-Art-Motion-Picture-Sound/dp/0240812409 This one covers the whole process, and as mentioned Dialogue Editing for Motion Pictures is very practical.


1

The best way to start is to read the basics on Nils Liberg site (http://nilsliberg.se/ksp/scripts/tutorial/) and follow VI-Control Kontakt Scripting section of their forum (http://www.vi-control.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=65) Cheers, Luca


1

Another good beginners resource is: http://www.nilsliberg.se/ksp/scripts/tutorial/ Or from NI themselves: http://www.audiotek.cz/produktyATK/ni/kontakt3_p2.pdf Or http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jul10/articles/kontakt1.htm Or http://www.askaudiomag.com/articles/introduction-to-scripting-in-kontakt-part-1 I'll stop at this point, but a bit of a basic ...


1

Skarik's tips are good, but I would like to add: Practice and play with your instruments and write music (even short compositions or loops). In synths practice means really exhausting the synth's features so you know what it's composed of and form a sense of its "tonal range", so to speak. While other resources may give you tips about different things that ...


1

Hi Akachi, welcome to SSD! This site is more focused on film, computer game and theatre sound design, rather than the 'synth programming' type of sound design. However, there are many in this great community who also dabble in music, and use synths regularly in their work, so you should hopefully still get some good answers! I myself would point you ...


1

Hi Shane, Welcome to SSD. Probably many of those books have sections on vocoding. What level of information are you trying to find? Are you looking for info on basic use or do you already know the basics and are looking for more detailed info? For basic music tech information Sound on Sound is a good source for general, well written articles. Here's an ...


1

The specific manual of the vocoder that you're using. The overall idea of a vocoder is simple. In laymans terms: You have two audio inputs: the source and the modulator. The vocoder is a bunch of bandpass filters with envelope followers on each one of the filter bands. The envelope followers listen to the modulator input at each filter band, i.e. the ...


1

I find a good understanding of acoustic principles a vital aspect for sound design, especially when it comes to setting sounds in different environments - difficult to do well unless you understand how sound waves move and interact with obstacles. I recommend Master Handbook of Acoustics to my students. Quit scientific, but gives some great descriptions of ...


1

Tomlison Holman - Sound for Film and Television, is good book too. Includes stuff from shooting to post.


1

I would recommend two books: The Art of Digital Audio by John Watkinson and Elements of Computer Music by F. Richard Moore. The first for his generality, is a very interesting book useful for introducing to many matters regarding digital audio. The 2nd is my preferred for his semplicity and clarity; though not very complete in respect to The Computer Music ...


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