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6

There are (at least) two ways to approach this: Find an appropriate recording to use as a starting point Record your own wind and use that as a starting point Either way, you're going to need to do some experimenting to get the sound you're after. The first tool I'd reach for to create a "whipping" sensation would be either an amplitude modulator (think ...


3

Generating a realistic wind noise is a tad hard, but this might work: Don't use a generator, use a recording of white noise (or pink noise, if available) Apply Fruity Fast LP (around %30 Cutoff and some resonance) then some EQ gain to qqmid-lows Adding some reverb with big room size will sweeten it Add pitch, cutoff and volume automation to make it sound ...


2

I will add AudioWind from the AudioGaming company, at www.audiogaming.net I have bought and used both their AudioWind and AudioRain products. Unfortunately it's an expensive option, but what you get is a lot of control over modulations, and speed; surround support, which is super cool, and for the most part the sound, though generated by algorithm rather ...


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I can recommend "Winds of Nature": http://www.boomlibrary.com/boomlibrary/products/winds-of-nature


2

Have you checked out Frank's set? I like to record where I can, but his is a pretty comprehensive starting point if you need a jump-start on variety. As far as recording goes, more brittle types of leaves work best I find - palm trees (and other such stalky things like corn fields), and a set of brittle winter maple tree leaves I recorded at my family's ...


2

Not as long as you don't seriously overdo it, especially not the NTG-3 which can take quite a beating. What you will get if blowing too hard into a regular microphone is an absolutely useless distorted sound though, and any directional mic will get boomy as hell from any kind of wind. If you wanna use actual blowing noises, an omnidirectional mic is a much ...


2

Have you tried worldizing your samples? It won't cost you anything but your time and you'll undoubtably learn a lot in the process. Also, try reaching for complex delays in lieu of reverbs. Soundtoys EchoBoy is a great choice if you have it, otherwise nearly any delay plug will help get you started.


2

Try Mountain Air: http://www.tonsturm.com/Soundpacks/files/Mountain_Air.html And/or layer some textures from the Blow Tools set. Those have some good textures to work with.


1

Let me try to point some of my comments more towards an answer... If you really need the sound of wind, then you need to re-create the surfaces for it to interact with. Wind, by itself, doesn't actually make any noise. An upturned bicycle is simply a convenient & common device whereby you can, rather than move the air, move a set of surfaces which will ...


1

You need to add another layer. Simply changing the volume of your existing sound effect won't cut it. Add another layer. Preferably from a different source. I have used a pair of microphones next to a split-system air-conditioner before - that can be quite effective.


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The whole idea of the shotgun is that it mainly picks up ambient noise that is in the direction it's pointed. Have the speaker stand with their backs to the quietest area around. If there are trees, walls, hedges, etc., that's where you want the speaker. A truck rolling by or a jet flying over is going to get all over your audio no matter what, so you have ...


1

There are a few ways to do this. For one you can pull it out in post production with some mixing tricks. EQ and noise gates can be your friend here. Keep in mind that you wont want to go too crazy since some background noise is nice. You can try tucking the lav behind a collar or in the neck of the shirt. this may help to block some of the wind. You can ...


1

Perhaps very strong wind can damage it – but before that happens, the wind noise will be too overwhelming for the signal to be any use at all. So, you will need at least a foam windscreen, for anything from an ordinary sea breeze upwards. A blimp, if it's actually supposed to sound good... Also consider that sea breeze is not like land breeze. Salt ...


1

As there was no answer and I couldn't find information about this elsewhere, I performed a small analysis. Using the samples available here, I found the following attack time ranges (all times in seconds): Trombone pianissimo: [0.070, 0.234] Trombone fortissimo: [0.041, 0.050] Tuba pianissimo: [0.033, 0.072] Tuba fortissimo: [0.012, 0.025] Trumpet ...


1

Hi I have lots of 'empty-space' records, interior and ext. It's not completed for a collection yet but most of them are finish prepared, 3-4 minutes long. Ext. tracks were recorded in the mountains and have different colors of 'nothing'. Interior tracks all are room tones, about 2 minutes long. Some of them sounds more electric, others more ventilation, ...


1

I think Jay already provided you with some excellent advice. I can only add that I liked working with the 'Blow Tools' library from Sound Ideas, they have very distinct sounding winds. Some sound outdated but I like some of the short duration stuff, you could use that as a layer or as a sidechain/modulator.


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