8

You have to update your firmware first, if you haven't already done so: http://www.zoom.co.jp/downloads/h4n/software/ Then you just go to: Menu / Input / Turn OFF 1/2 Link (http://www.hv20.com/showthread.php?43895-Zoom-h4n) Once linking is turned off, all you need to do is to click on the buttons (1) or (2) under the MIC-button, and just adjust the Rec ...


6

Hi Willa, I would put it in stereo mode and select input 1 or 2 (this will de-select the external mics). In the "Input" menu, make sure stereo link is OFF. This will allow you to adjust the recording level for Input 1 and 2 independently (simply press 1 or 2 on the h4n and then adjust the input level for that channel). Plug in your microphones into the xlr ...


5

I'm not sure I understand if you mean fix it in post or on set... If it's in post: I'd start by setting the levels so that they match somewhat. If the BG noise is too high in one scene I'd try and de-noise it. If the de-noising don't sound good, just forget about it and try to cut around it. Setting the levels and using EQ to match the previous clip can ...


4

Erik makes a very good point. More and more, mixers schedules don't permit to be choosing between sides. As an editor you should be confident in your tracks to just choose your best sounding side and go with it. However... There are situations that require boom and lav to make it even acceptable without looping. (Or typically getting it the best it can ...


4

You cant... So either you spend a lot of time trying your very best to make the phase perfect, to then realize that the mixer promptly chooses the best mic for the job and mutes the other (or uses it pretty low as a room mic). Phase issues sound VERY different in a near field monitoring than it will on a dub stage. So choose your sounds/mics wisely. Well, ...


4

Assuming it's a "standard" sort of scene... Two Shot (won't really get wide in a car), OTS, OTS and a couple of CU's, then the most important thing you can do is to make sure you get LOTS of room tone (ie background sound) for each setup. Inevitably the noise is going to be different from one side to the other, and an editor(you or another) will need that ...


4

Is there an chance that you can ADR your questions later (in post)? If yes, I'd attach the two lavs to the 2 people in front of the camera, since they are the point of interest and record your questions in post production. While doing the actual interview you could place a smartphone (or dictaphone,etc.) unobtrusive nearby yourself. Nobody will notice ...


3

Last week I was on a WW2 period short where the SS officers were wearing woolen uniforms. The noise from the wool rubbing on itself was incredibly loud, but fortunately most of the time they were wearing hats. I was using Lectrasonic transmitters with COS-11 mics, and just taped the mics to the underside of the hat brim - perfect clean audio. There were a ...


3

.One extra thing apart of the already mentioned above. As sound dudes we are very aware (much more than mortals) about the sound quality of our recordings. To add consistency to your recordings a trick is mach your best (cleanest/driest) recordings to your crappiest one (after you have done everything you can to improve this bad recording) People tend to ...


3

If it were me, I would have asked the director: "Why isn't the lighting the exact same on the beach as it is in the hallway? Why didn't you place the key light in the exact same spot and have the same exact exposure and backlight as you had from the sun on the beach than the florescent light in the hallway? Lighting guys I know would have lit the scene to ...


3

every recording is different obv, and the source dictates the treatment. With that said, there are some basic similarities to lav recordings due to the capsule size and the specific usage. The super small capsules are often very dynamic and clip at lower volumes, they often require faster compression attack times than VO recordings, but compression can ...


3

Yes, microphones like the AT899 give you the option of using internal battery power OR phantom power (from the XLR). Yes, microphones like the Rode Lav require phantom power without the option. Yes, the more phantom power is sucked out of your Zoom H6, the faster it drains the available battery power. You are almost always better off running equipment ...


3

'Sensitivity' is a measure of 'how much electric it puts out for a given level of sonic input' It has nothing whatsoever to do with its ability to separate wanted from unwanted sound. Microphones cannot do that, they have no brain, only ears. Some are designed to pick up everything around them, known as an omni pickup pattern - i.e. it hears equally ...


2

Firstly, directors get a kick out of running the sound guys down unless, of course, they're doing it for free. Secondly, if you can close your eyes and still get a reasonable idea of the location just from listening, then the sound is good. Only reduce location noise when it detracts from the focal point of the recording. Even then, don't overdo it - just ...


2

If you keep your radio mic in a similar area all the time (which can be difficult with wardrobe changes, but that's part of the challenge!), that should be consistent and not contain too much noise. A big thing to watch out for though, is clothing rustle. Booming is a trickier proposition. You want push that thing so far into frame that the camera op starts ...


2

As a side note. I have been known to add crap to sell less than stellar performed ADR. Example several shots of couple walking and talking. Down stairways corridors etc. Lavs unusable. Added reverb (of course) and fake lav noise rustling. As viewers we have been used to hearing lavs ins scenes like his and the added rustle really sold it. Without it it was ...


2

One simpler method of doing fine phase adjustment such as Tyler describes might be to use a phase adjustment plugin such as Radix's Auto-Alignment plugin. Haven't had a chance to test it out yet but worth a go perhaps? (I think Voxengo do one too)


2

Within the standard limitations of lavs, they're awesome. I was pretty happy with my Countryman B3 lav, but the DPA 4060's never cease to impress. About the only thing sweeter is the Sanken COS-11, which seems to be the lav of choice when inter-cutting with Schoeps mics. But I'm a huge fan of the DPA modular connector system, especially as a sound designer ...


2

Hey Take a look at the Rode PinMic It's designed to be put through a button hole and it's really small and discreet, you could hide it using some light coloured material to match the actors costume. I use the Rode Lavs all the time and love them, they are also reasonably priced, you should be able to plug them directly into the H1 but you need to also get ...


2

I haven't used it yet, but I've been dieing to try DUY's Magic Spectrum. I've heard great things about it. Might be worth a look. If you can't do that, I've found that EQ'ing in individual bands of frequencies at a time can make the job of matching dialog MUCH easier. Use high and low pass filters to make a band pass on the original and the re-record, then ...


2

If you've got the budget to work with a Lectrosonic's 400 Series, then just do it. It's the best thing I've ever worked with on a production before and well worth the money. I've had a pair of Sennheiser G3 100's for a year now and they've worked pretty well for me. If you've got Tram's and COS-11 mics that will work with these transmitters, I'm sure it'll ...


2

Well, the obvious way to tackle pop / rumble is a hefty low cut. On spoken voice, you can usually do away with everything below 120 Hz, sometimes even higher (up to 500 Hz may be suitable in some rooms). Add a shelving filter to take away some of the low mids a bit more gently. The danger is that you end up with a thin “telephone-like” sound. ...


2

As it will not be seen, you have the freedom to attach it to the actor's head or face, rather than any clothing/costume. You could use a boom version, over the ear & just to the side of the mouth, for greatest SNR. Otherwise, down through the hair & attach to the forehead, similar to a standard hairline install, but tweaked even closer because of ...


1

This is very doable. Here are some options: Wired Lavaliere (less expensive, movement restrictive but they are in a box anyway) Wireless Lavaliere (more expensive, more maintenance required, lots of freedom of movement) Mount them in their hair above the mask, or near the edge of the mask by the mouth. Omnis will give you a more natural sound, but a ...


1

worked with puppeteers including the amazing Kevin clash and they use headbands with a wired lapel mic attached pointing towards the mouth. This is also the technique used for the actors in Where the Wild things are. Rather than ADR it straight to mic they acted it all out. Could be worth a try and that way you can use quite a directional microphone without ...


1

Hey, It is devinitely either: week RF transmission => change freq and try again low batteries (seriously) => change :-) Each system behaves differently. So what hardware do You use?


1

As in ADR, i think the most important thing to match is your talent's performance. Also, they need to say the whole sentences which contained the mispronounced words - not just the words themselves - or your rhythm will be off. If you can get your talent to match their original tone (or pitch) and rhythm, then dropping in the new words will be easy, and ...


1

Just riffing off the top of my head: Any number of things could cause this, but my guess is RF or EM interference. A lot depends on what the ticks sound like: Soft thwps, hard hits, just dropouts, etc. Phones and nearby antennae could introduce such sounds, and in Filipe's case, if changing frequency helped, that sounds like RF interference to me. Another ...


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