4

Is there an chance that you can ADR your questions later (in post)? If yes, I'd attach the two lavs to the 2 people in front of the camera, since they are the point of interest and record your questions in post production. While doing the actual interview you could place a smartphone (or dictaphone,etc.) unobtrusive nearby yourself. Nobody will notice ...


4

Assuming it's a "standard" sort of scene... Two Shot (won't really get wide in a car), OTS, OTS and a couple of CU's, then the most important thing you can do is to make sure you get LOTS of room tone (ie background sound) for each setup. Inevitably the noise is going to be different from one side to the other, and an editor(you or another) will need that ...


3

Last week I was on a WW2 period short where the SS officers were wearing woolen uniforms. The noise from the wool rubbing on itself was incredibly loud, but fortunately most of the time they were wearing hats. I was using Lectrasonic transmitters with COS-11 mics, and just taped the mics to the underside of the hat brim - perfect clean audio. There were a ...


3

Yes, microphones like the AT899 give you the option of using internal battery power OR phantom power (from the XLR). Yes, microphones like the Rode Lav require phantom power without the option. Yes, the more phantom power is sucked out of your Zoom H6, the faster it drains the available battery power. You are almost always better off running equipment ...


3

every recording is different obv, and the source dictates the treatment. With that said, there are some basic similarities to lav recordings due to the capsule size and the specific usage. The super small capsules are often very dynamic and clip at lower volumes, they often require faster compression attack times than VO recordings, but compression can ...


3

'Sensitivity' is a measure of 'how much electric it puts out for a given level of sonic input' It has nothing whatsoever to do with its ability to separate wanted from unwanted sound. Microphones cannot do that, they have no brain, only ears. Some are designed to pick up everything around them, known as an omni pickup pattern - i.e. it hears equally ...


2

If you've got the budget to work with a Lectrosonic's 400 Series, then just do it. It's the best thing I've ever worked with on a production before and well worth the money. I've had a pair of Sennheiser G3 100's for a year now and they've worked pretty well for me. If you've got Tram's and COS-11 mics that will work with these transmitters, I'm sure it'll ...


2

Within the standard limitations of lavs, they're awesome. I was pretty happy with my Countryman B3 lav, but the DPA 4060's never cease to impress. About the only thing sweeter is the Sanken COS-11, which seems to be the lav of choice when inter-cutting with Schoeps mics. But I'm a huge fan of the DPA modular connector system, especially as a sound designer ...


2

Hey Take a look at the Rode PinMic It's designed to be put through a button hole and it's really small and discreet, you could hide it using some light coloured material to match the actors costume. I use the Rode Lavs all the time and love them, they are also reasonably priced, you should be able to plug them directly into the H1 but you need to also get ...


2

Well, the obvious way to tackle pop / rumble is a hefty low cut. On spoken voice, you can usually do away with everything below 120 Hz, sometimes even higher (up to 500 Hz may be suitable in some rooms). Add a shelving filter to take away some of the low mids a bit more gently. The danger is that you end up with a thin “telephone-like” sound. ...


2

As it will not be seen, you have the freedom to attach it to the actor's head or face, rather than any clothing/costume. You could use a boom version, over the ear & just to the side of the mouth, for greatest SNR. Otherwise, down through the hair & attach to the forehead, similar to a standard hairline install, but tweaked even closer because of ...


2

You don't need 3 different sets of recording equipment. All you need is a mixer and a recorder. The mixer allows you to take inputs of varying impedances and levels, balance them, and pass to the recorder. Don't use audio splitters, as they will not impedance match and will cause degradation of signal. 4 track mixers are really cheap these days.


1

Yes the Lavalier can go to directly into a smartphone, just make sure you purchase the Micon11 connector together with the Lav. The Lavalier needs one of the "Micon" connectors to work anyway, it's a modular system that allows you to use the Lavalier with a whole range of devices, from 3.5mm minijack, XLR, smartphones (TRRS) or various brands of wireless ...


1

1) you will need something to manage the inputs. I only know of software solutions. I use Logic. 2) I don't have experience with the UMC1820 but I have their XAir x18 and it's a single device with multiple channels, probably safe to assume the UMC is the same. 3) not that I'm aware of. Since it sounds like you'll want to do some sort of mixdown anyway, why ...


1

A wireless lav on the dancer and Foley replacement are only two possible solutions. And probably not even the most commonly used solutions. Conventional micing techniques, and barrier ("PZM") microphones are more commonly used than either wireless lav or Foley replacement. Most of the details that are used to make these trade-off decisions are not disclosed ...


1

I've never recorded in this typical situation but i could be done. Espesecially if the image (shot and frame) show the actual location and the listener is supposed to feel this space. On loudness/heaviness of background noises. It depends on the time of day (evenings will have less traffic), but also the car model and if windows or doors are being opened ...


1

You have a few different options. You can use some gates on the lapel mics and set the threshold high enough to cut the TV bleedover, but not the character dialogue. This has the downside of potentially sounding unnatural, and you'll have to tune the attack and decay of the gates to get the speech to not sound choppy as it cuts in and out. If the TV sound ...


1

Your MacBook only has Line In and Line Out ports. The Line In port does not contain a microphone preamplifier (You may be able to boost the microphone signal enough to make it useable, but it will most likely still be low in volume and sound weak). However the Line Out (yes - the line out port!) actually contains a real microphone input also (for use with ...


1

If you are able to wire an adapter yourself, you can do it this way (it will not be a balanced connection though). Shield to XLR male Pin 1 (Ground) White wire goes to XLR male Pin 2 (Signal) Bridge XLR male Pin 3 to XLR Pin 1 (Ground) Important! Do not send phantom power to the microphone (it will damage it!)! Use the inline power pack with battery to ...


1

The whole idea of the shotgun is that it mainly picks up ambient noise that is in the direction it's pointed. Have the speaker stand with their backs to the quietest area around. If there are trees, walls, hedges, etc., that's where you want the speaker. A truck rolling by or a jet flying over is going to get all over your audio no matter what, so you have ...


1

There are a few ways to do this. For one you can pull it out in post production with some mixing tricks. EQ and noise gates can be your friend here. Keep in mind that you wont want to go too crazy since some background noise is nice. You can try tucking the lav behind a collar or in the neck of the shirt. this may help to block some of the wind. You can ...


1

I would first start by isolating devices to the minimum subset where you can reproduce the problem. For example, if the mixer isn't plugged in to the camera, is it still a problem? If levels are peaking, is gain set properly, does adjusting gain impact the problem more or less than expected? Does XLR vs 1/4" make a difference on the noise. Are the ...


1

Seems like you should start looking at other variables, namely trying another frequency, trying different transmitters (not receivers), changing batteries in one unit at a time, changing locations (I trust that you've checked for presence of microwave towers and other environmental concerns), etc. The variables are many and this will take a good while to ...


1

Does the sound go away when you mute your problem mic? Here are some things I would try: If it goes away when muted, it is likely RF interference so please move your receiver away from speakers and radios. You can also adjust the squelch level on your microphone to reduce RF levels when not in use. If it doesn't go away when muted, please try another ...


1

Contrary to most here apparently, I find in reality I am often feeding a little bit of lav mic into the boom track to boost a word or sentence which is slightly off mic, or using some frequencies of the lav mic to give more presence to the boom perhaps in a wide shot where the boom is not placed ideally, or using the lav mic as a main mic and using the boom ...


1

I think it's more than just building an adapter or straight wiring. You also have to worry about impedance matching. I would search/post your question to RAMPS. Those guys should definitely know. https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/rec.arts.movies.production.sound Personally, a lav like the mke1 is not going to pick up much useable audio ...


1

The old lavs in the sun visors rig works a treat. I've also gotten great results rigging them to the head rests (if characters turn to talk to people in the back seats) and around the side windows (if characters are talking to people outside the car).


1

Rigging Microphones in Cars


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