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'Sensitivity' is a measure of 'how much electric it puts out for a given level of sonic input' It has nothing whatsoever to do with its ability to separate wanted from unwanted sound. Microphones cannot do that, they have no brain, only ears. Some are designed to pick up everything around them, known as an omni pickup pattern - i.e. it hears equally ...


3

Yes, microphones like the AT899 give you the option of using internal battery power OR phantom power (from the XLR). Yes, microphones like the Rode Lav require phantom power without the option. Yes, the more phantom power is sucked out of your Zoom H6, the faster it drains the available battery power. You are almost always better off running equipment ...


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Well, the obvious way to tackle pop / rumble is a hefty low cut. On spoken voice, you can usually do away with everything below 120 Hz, sometimes even higher (up to 500 Hz may be suitable in some rooms). Add a shelving filter to take away some of the low mids a bit more gently. The danger is that you end up with a thin “telephone-like” sound. ...


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You don't need 3 different sets of recording equipment. All you need is a mixer and a recorder. The mixer allows you to take inputs of varying impedances and levels, balance them, and pass to the recorder. Don't use audio splitters, as they will not impedance match and will cause degradation of signal. 4 track mixers are really cheap these days.


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As it will not be seen, you have the freedom to attach it to the actor's head or face, rather than any clothing/costume. You could use a boom version, over the ear & just to the side of the mouth, for greatest SNR. Otherwise, down through the hair & attach to the forehead, similar to a standard hairline install, but tweaked even closer because of ...


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There are some USB audio adapters which provide 5 or 7 channel output on 3.5mm TRS sockets. Those tend to have microphone inputs with bias voltage on them, too. Only problem is that the quality is not better than that of the average microphone input on a laptop. As a rule: anybody who has the temerity to provide a 3.5mm phone socket for a microphone will ...


1

If you're getting an external USB audio interface, get one that supports phantom power [48v]. The Shure [& many other pro-level lav mics] comes with interchangeable adaptors for connectivity to different manufacturers' body packs etc as well as 'regular' XLR. If you don't need to consider wireless integration, then XLR is the 'safe option'. I can't find ...


1

The Rode SmartLav+ is a high impedance [high-Z] mic, suited to computer headset/mic inputs. It also sounds like the pin-out of TRRS is designed to not confuse a computer's headset input. It's not really built for pro audio. Your Tascam, based on the plug input types [I can't see any real spec on their web page], is expecting a professional low impedance [low-...


1

It depends on the power expectations and circuit design of the microphone. Some phone lavalier mics use a LR44 battery. Maybe yours does, too. The LR44 battery, for example, has a nominal voltage of 1.5V and 105 mAh. USB has 5V and 3A (USB-C). That's a lot more power than a device using a LR44 battery would expect. If you wired it up directly, you'd probably ...


1

Here's my thinking, which considers "I'm on a tight budget" the #1 concern. True, lavaliers are standard for this type of work. But if you are on such a tight budget that you don't have a mixer, my suggestion is not to use lavaliers. Especially wired lavaliers if the cable run is going to be more than 25', unless you're using very expensive cable. ...


1

There are a number of options here. The most practical will be a wireless lavalier kit. Typical devices are the Rode Wireless Go or the Sennheiser G3. Some manufacturers also offer a 'butt-plug' style device which allows you to attach a transmitter directly to a handheld microphone directly via the XLR connection. However, handheld use of the mic is required....


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From your link... "Clip the microphone onto the headphone cable as close to the mouth as possible" Sound follows the inverse square law - to massively over-simplify, twice as far away is a quarter as loud, 4x times further = 1/16th as loud. So let's assume your background noise remains constant… & we have a mic 2 cm from your mouth compared to one ...


1

Let's take the elements of your question in order: Background noise - as @tetsujin said, move all noisy equipment out of your recording studio. Ideally, run your noisy PC in another room and just use longer cables. If you can't move it out, can you convert to silent cooling (water, or a ducted vent with a fan in another room) a single mic will be ...


1

The quality of a signal isn't directly related to the connectors or the cables used. A balanced audio signal can have lower noise than an unbalanced signal in the same environment, because the receiving electronics can be configured to reject certain kinds of noise (called common mode noise) from a balanced signal that can't be rejected from an unbalanced ...


1

You should be able to make this work with a couple of 1/8" female to 1/4" male adapters. Plug a lav mic into the adapter, then the adapter into one of the inputs on the bottom of the Zoom. Press and make sure inputs 1 and 2 are lit up red and record! However, I believe the Zoom can only record interleaved files from those inputs. The mics would still be ...


1

Yes the Lavalier can go to directly into a smartphone, just make sure you purchase the Micon11 connector together with the Lav. The Lavalier needs one of the "Micon" connectors to work anyway, it's a modular system that allows you to use the Lavalier with a whole range of devices, from 3.5mm minijack, XLR, smartphones (TRRS) or various brands of wireless ...


1

One setup that I've found to work pretty well is an all-in-one field recorder, such as a Zoom H6 or a Tascam Digital Portastudio. Such devices can often be found for cheaper than the cost of a full recording setup and is an all-in-one device that handles everything for you. Plus, they keep their resale value pretty well so after you're done with the project ...


1

Have you actually TRIED recording with a phone in your conference room? If you identify exactly where is the microphone and hold it around 8 inches from the subject's mouth you may be surprised how well it works, assuming your room is not very reverberant. DO NOT assume you have to go out and buy extra gear (especially for a one-time temporary application) ...


1

1) you will need something to manage the inputs. I only know of software solutions. I use Logic. 2) I don't have experience with the UMC1820 but I have their XAir x18 and it's a single device with multiple channels, probably safe to assume the UMC is the same. 3) not that I'm aware of. Since it sounds like you'll want to do some sort of mixdown anyway, why ...


1

A wireless lav on the dancer and Foley replacement are only two possible solutions. And probably not even the most commonly used solutions. Conventional micing techniques, and barrier ("PZM") microphones are more commonly used than either wireless lav or Foley replacement. Most of the details that are used to make these trade-off decisions are not disclosed ...


1

You have a few different options. You can use some gates on the lapel mics and set the threshold high enough to cut the TV bleedover, but not the character dialogue. This has the downside of potentially sounding unnatural, and you'll have to tune the attack and decay of the gates to get the speech to not sound choppy as it cuts in and out. If the TV sound ...


1

Your MacBook only has Line In and Line Out ports. The Line In port does not contain a microphone preamplifier (You may be able to boost the microphone signal enough to make it useable, but it will most likely still be low in volume and sound weak). However the Line Out (yes - the line out port!) actually contains a real microphone input also (for use with ...


1

If you are able to wire an adapter yourself, you can do it this way (it will not be a balanced connection though). Shield to XLR male Pin 1 (Ground) White wire goes to XLR male Pin 2 (Signal) Bridge XLR male Pin 3 to XLR Pin 1 (Ground) Important! Do not send phantom power to the microphone (it will damage it!)! Use the inline power pack with battery to ...


1

The whole idea of the shotgun is that it mainly picks up ambient noise that is in the direction it's pointed. Have the speaker stand with their backs to the quietest area around. If there are trees, walls, hedges, etc., that's where you want the speaker. A truck rolling by or a jet flying over is going to get all over your audio no matter what, so you have ...


1

There are a few ways to do this. For one you can pull it out in post production with some mixing tricks. EQ and noise gates can be your friend here. Keep in mind that you wont want to go too crazy since some background noise is nice. You can try tucking the lav behind a collar or in the neck of the shirt. this may help to block some of the wind. You can ...


1

I would first start by isolating devices to the minimum subset where you can reproduce the problem. For example, if the mixer isn't plugged in to the camera, is it still a problem? If levels are peaking, is gain set properly, does adjusting gain impact the problem more or less than expected? Does XLR vs 1/4" make a difference on the noise. Are the ...


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Seems like you should start looking at other variables, namely trying another frequency, trying different transmitters (not receivers), changing batteries in one unit at a time, changing locations (I trust that you've checked for presence of microwave towers and other environmental concerns), etc. The variables are many and this will take a good while to ...


1

Does the sound go away when you mute your problem mic? Here are some things I would try: If it goes away when muted, it is likely RF interference so please move your receiver away from speakers and radios. You can also adjust the squelch level on your microphone to reduce RF levels when not in use. If it doesn't go away when muted, please try another ...


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Contrary to most here apparently, I find in reality I am often feeding a little bit of lav mic into the boom track to boost a word or sentence which is slightly off mic, or using some frequencies of the lav mic to give more presence to the boom perhaps in a wide shot where the boom is not placed ideally, or using the lav mic as a main mic and using the boom ...


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