8

You have to update your firmware first, if you haven't already done so: http://www.zoom.co.jp/downloads/h4n/software/ Then you just go to: Menu / Input / Turn OFF 1/2 Link (http://www.hv20.com/showthread.php?43895-Zoom-h4n) Once linking is turned off, all you need to do is to click on the buttons (1) or (2) under the MIC-button, and just adjust the Rec ...


6

Hi Willa, I would put it in stereo mode and select input 1 or 2 (this will de-select the external mics). In the "Input" menu, make sure stereo link is OFF. This will allow you to adjust the recording level for Input 1 and 2 independently (simply press 1 or 2 on the h4n and then adjust the input level for that channel). Plug in your microphones into the xlr ...


4

Is there an chance that you can ADR your questions later (in post)? If yes, I'd attach the two lavs to the 2 people in front of the camera, since they are the point of interest and record your questions in post production. While doing the actual interview you could place a smartphone (or dictaphone,etc.) unobtrusive nearby yourself. Nobody will notice ...


4

Assuming it's a "standard" sort of scene... Two Shot (won't really get wide in a car), OTS, OTS and a couple of CU's, then the most important thing you can do is to make sure you get LOTS of room tone (ie background sound) for each setup. Inevitably the noise is going to be different from one side to the other, and an editor(you or another) will need that ...


3

Last week I was on a WW2 period short where the SS officers were wearing woolen uniforms. The noise from the wool rubbing on itself was incredibly loud, but fortunately most of the time they were wearing hats. I was using Lectrasonic transmitters with COS-11 mics, and just taped the mics to the underside of the hat brim - perfect clean audio. There were a ...


3

every recording is different obv, and the source dictates the treatment. With that said, there are some basic similarities to lav recordings due to the capsule size and the specific usage. The super small capsules are often very dynamic and clip at lower volumes, they often require faster compression attack times than VO recordings, but compression can ...


3

Yes, microphones like the AT899 give you the option of using internal battery power OR phantom power (from the XLR). Yes, microphones like the Rode Lav require phantom power without the option. Yes, the more phantom power is sucked out of your Zoom H6, the faster it drains the available battery power. You are almost always better off running equipment ...


3

'Sensitivity' is a measure of 'how much electric it puts out for a given level of sonic input' It has nothing whatsoever to do with its ability to separate wanted from unwanted sound. Microphones cannot do that, they have no brain, only ears. Some are designed to pick up everything around them, known as an omni pickup pattern - i.e. it hears equally ...


2

If you've got the budget to work with a Lectrosonic's 400 Series, then just do it. It's the best thing I've ever worked with on a production before and well worth the money. I've had a pair of Sennheiser G3 100's for a year now and they've worked pretty well for me. If you've got Tram's and COS-11 mics that will work with these transmitters, I'm sure it'll ...


2

Within the standard limitations of lavs, they're awesome. I was pretty happy with my Countryman B3 lav, but the DPA 4060's never cease to impress. About the only thing sweeter is the Sanken COS-11, which seems to be the lav of choice when inter-cutting with Schoeps mics. But I'm a huge fan of the DPA modular connector system, especially as a sound designer ...


2

Hey Take a look at the Rode PinMic It's designed to be put through a button hole and it's really small and discreet, you could hide it using some light coloured material to match the actors costume. I use the Rode Lavs all the time and love them, they are also reasonably priced, you should be able to plug them directly into the H1 but you need to also get ...


2

I haven't used it yet, but I've been dieing to try DUY's Magic Spectrum. I've heard great things about it. Might be worth a look. If you can't do that, I've found that EQ'ing in individual bands of frequencies at a time can make the job of matching dialog MUCH easier. Use high and low pass filters to make a band pass on the original and the re-record, then ...


2

Well, the obvious way to tackle pop / rumble is a hefty low cut. On spoken voice, you can usually do away with everything below 120 Hz, sometimes even higher (up to 500 Hz may be suitable in some rooms). Add a shelving filter to take away some of the low mids a bit more gently. The danger is that you end up with a thin “telephone-like” sound. ...


2

As it will not be seen, you have the freedom to attach it to the actor's head or face, rather than any clothing/costume. You could use a boom version, over the ear & just to the side of the mouth, for greatest SNR. Otherwise, down through the hair & attach to the forehead, similar to a standard hairline install, but tweaked even closer because of ...


1

Does the sound go away when you mute your problem mic? Here are some things I would try: If it goes away when muted, it is likely RF interference so please move your receiver away from speakers and radios. You can also adjust the squelch level on your microphone to reduce RF levels when not in use. If it doesn't go away when muted, please try another ...


1

I've never recorded in this typical situation but i could be done. Espesecially if the image (shot and frame) show the actual location and the listener is supposed to feel this space. On loudness/heaviness of background noises. It depends on the time of day (evenings will have less traffic), but also the car model and if windows or doors are being opened ...


1

This is very doable. Here are some options: Wired Lavaliere (less expensive, movement restrictive but they are in a box anyway) Wireless Lavaliere (more expensive, more maintenance required, lots of freedom of movement) Mount them in their hair above the mask, or near the edge of the mask by the mouth. Omnis will give you a more natural sound, but a ...


1

worked with puppeteers including the amazing Kevin clash and they use headbands with a wired lapel mic attached pointing towards the mouth. This is also the technique used for the actors in Where the Wild things are. Rather than ADR it straight to mic they acted it all out. Could be worth a try and that way you can use quite a directional microphone without ...


1

Hey, It is devinitely either: week RF transmission => change freq and try again low batteries (seriously) => change :-) Each system behaves differently. So what hardware do You use?


1

As in ADR, i think the most important thing to match is your talent's performance. Also, they need to say the whole sentences which contained the mispronounced words - not just the words themselves - or your rhythm will be off. If you can get your talent to match their original tone (or pitch) and rhythm, then dropping in the new words will be easy, and ...


1

I think it's more than just building an adapter or straight wiring. You also have to worry about impedance matching. I would search/post your question to RAMPS. Those guys should definitely know. https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/rec.arts.movies.production.sound Personally, a lav like the mke1 is not going to pick up much useable audio ...


1

The old lavs in the sun visors rig works a treat. I've also gotten great results rigging them to the head rests (if characters turn to talk to people in the back seats) and around the side windows (if characters are talking to people outside the car).


1

Rigging Microphones in Cars


1

+1 Iains comment. I'd also say though if they are wearing helmets each(and you cannot see the actors mouths moving)-surely you can just wildtrack/ADR the lines afterwards? If it is not a close up shot either you'll get away with wildtrack I expect. Otherwise-turn down the sensitivity of your radio mics, consider planting mics if you want the pass by of the ...


1

i would say if the gear is to be used by mostly inexperienced people, then maybe the lav is not the way to go. i would think it would be easier to boom.


1

I must say I'm very fond of Lectrosonic's transmitters/receivers! Built like tanks and very trusty in my opinion! The last year I've worked very much with the combo Lectrosonic and DPA, and for the first time when working with lavalier, though I still very much prefer boom, I'm fairy satisfied with what I got!


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